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Author Vandewalle, G.; Maquet, P.; Dijk, D.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light as a modulator of cognitive brain function Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Trends in Cognitive Sciences Abbreviated Journal Trends Cogn Sci  
  Volume 13 Issue 10 Pages 429-438  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Brain/anatomy & histology/*physiology; Brain Mapping; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cognition/*physiology; Diagnostic Imaging/methods; Humans; *Light; Melatonin/metabolism; Retina/anatomy & histology/physiology; Visual Pathways/anatomy & histology/physiology  
  Abstract Humans are a diurnal species usually exposed to light while engaged in cognitive tasks. Light not only guides performance on these tasks through vision but also exerts non-visual effects that are mediated in part by recently discovered retinal ganglion cells maximally sensitive to blue light. We review recent neuroimaging studies which demonstrate that the wavelength, duration and intensity of light exposure modulate brain responses to (non-visual) cognitive tasks. These responses to light are initially observed in alertness-related subcortical structures (hypothalamus, brainstem, thalamus) and limbic areas (amygdala and hippocampus), followed by modulations of activity in cortical areas, which can ultimately affect behaviour. Light emerges as an important modulator of brain function and cognition.  
  Address Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liege, 8 Allee du 6 Aout, Batiment B30, B-4000 Liege, Belgium. gilles.vandewalle@umontreal.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1364-6613 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes PMID:19748817 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 830  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lacoeuilhe, A.; Machon, N.; Julien, J.-F.; Le Bocq, A.; Kerbiriou, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The influence of low intensities of light pollution on bat communities in a semi-natural context Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 9 Issue 10 Pages e103042  
  Keywords Animals; mammals; Vertebrates; bats; light pollution; foraging strategy  
  Abstract Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasingly significant issue worldwide. Over the past century, the use of artificial lighting has increased in association with human activity. Artificial lights are suspected to have substantial effects on the ecology of many species, e.g., by producing discontinuities in the territories of nocturnal animals. We analyzed the potential influence of the intensity and type of artificial light on bat activity in a semi-natural landscape in France. We used a species approach, followed by a trait-based approach, to light sensitivity. We also investigated whether the effect of light could be related to foraging traits. We performed acoustic surveys at sites located along a gradient of light intensities to assess the activity of 15 species of bats. We identified 2 functional response groups of species: one group that was light-tolerant and one group that was light-intolerant. Among the species in the latter group that appear to be disadvantaged by lighting conditions, many are rare and threatened in Europe, whereas the species from the former group are better able to thrive in disturbed habitats such as lighted areas and may actually benefit from artificial lighting. Finally, several methods of controlling light pollution are suggested for the conservation of bat communities. Recommendations for light management and the creation of dim-light corridors are proposed; these strategies may play an important role in protecting against the impact of light pollution on nocturnal animals.  
  Address National Museum of Natural History, Ecology and Sciences Conservation Center, CESCO-UMR7204 MNHN-CNRS-UPMC, Paris, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes PMID:25360638; PMCID:PMC4215844 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1066  
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Author Bará, S.; Tilve, V.; Nievas, M.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Zamorano, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Zernike power spectra of clear and cloudy light-polluted urban night skies Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Applied Optics Abbreviated Journal Appl. Opt.  
  Volume 54 Issue 13 Pages 4120-4129  
  Keywords Skyglow; artificial ligh at night; light pollution; Zernike; power spectrum; atmospheric optics; imaging systems; image analysis  
  Abstract The Zernike power spectra of the all-sky night brightness distributions of clear and cloudy nights are computed using a modal projection approach. The results obtained in the B, V and R Johnson-Cousins' photometric bands during a one-year campaign of observations at a light-polluted urban site show that these spectra can be described by simple power laws with exponents close to -3 for clear nights and -2 for cloudy ones. The second-moment matrices of the Zernike coefficients show relevant correlations between modes. The multiplicative role of the cloud cover, that contributes to a significant increase of the brightness of the urban night sky in comparison with the values obtained in clear nights, is described in the Zernike space.  
  Address Area de Optica, Dept. Fisica Aplicada. Facultade de Fisica / Facultade de Optica e Optometría Universidade de Santiago de Compostela Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; salva.bara@usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Optical Society of America Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1156  
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Author Clewley, G.D.; Plummer, K.E.; Robinson, R.A.; Simm, C.H.; Toms, M.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of artificial lighting on the arrival time of birds using garden feeding stations in winter: A missed opportunity? Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal Urban Ecosystems  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 535–546  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial light; Citizen science; Foraging; Garden birds; Supplementary feeding; Urbanization  
  Abstract The proliferation of artificial lighting at night is one of the key anthropogenic changes associated with urbanised areas as well as some non-urban areas. Disruption to natural light/dark regimes can have considerable effects on the timing of different behaviours of birds, particularly during the breeding season. However, the effect of artificial lights on the timing of behaviours during winter has received relatively little attention, despite the fact that time partitioning of foraging can have implications for avian winter survival. In this study, we assess at a landscape scale during winter, whether birds arrive at feeding stations earlier in areas with increased levels of artificial lighting using data from a citizen science project. Arrival times of the ten most commonly recorded species were associated with a combination of the density of artificial lights, temperature, rainfall and urban land cover. We found no evidence that birds advance the onset of foraging in gardens with more artificial lights nearby; contrary to our prediction, birds generally arrived later into these areas. This is possibly a response to differences in food availability or predation risk in areas with more artificial lights. We conclude that artificial light at night may not be as important for driving the timing of foraging behaviour in winter as previously thought, but it remains to be seen whether this represents a missed opportunity to extend the foraging period or an adaptive response.  
  Address British Trust for Ornithology, The Nunnery, Thetford, Norfolk, IP24 2PU, UK; gary.clewley(at)bto.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1083-8155 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1316  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shapira, I.; Walker, E.; Brunton, D.H.; Raubenheimer, D. url  openurl
  Title Responses to direct versus indirect cues of predation and competition in naϊve invasive mice: implications for management Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication New Zealand Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal NZ J. of Ecol.  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 33-40  
  Keywords Animals; Mus musculus; mice; New Zealand; foraging; moonlight; giving-up density; GUD; moon phase  
  Abstract Many populations of invasive mice Mus musculus in New Zealand have experienced the removal of mammalian predators and competitors, with the consequence of mouse population irruptions. The effects of these removals on mouse foraging are largely unknown, yet this information is essential for developing and implementing better mouse control. We investigated the effects of direct and indirect predatory cues on foraging of free-ranging mice at a site where mammalian predators were eradicated 5 years previously. We used 17 stations, each containing four trays of millet seeds mixed thoroughly in sand, with three unfamiliar mammalian (a predator, a competitor, and a herbivore) odour treatments and a control (water), during the four phases of the moon. We measured mouse selectivity for treatment/control trays, giving-up densities (GUDs, a measure of food consumption), and tray encounter rates. Foraging by mice was not affected by odour cues from any of the unfamiliar mammals. Moonlight intensity, however, affected mouse foraging, with higher GUDs being recorded on brighter moon phases (full and waxing > new and waning) during the first night of the trials. This effect was less pronounced during the second night. Resource encounter rates were also affected, with the proportion of trays foraged lower during the brighter phases of the moon on both the first and second nights. We suggest that coordinating management efforts according to the phases of the moon has the potential to improve mouse control and reduce bait wastage.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 01106465 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1364  
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