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Author Li, X.; Xu, H.; Chen, X.; Li, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Potential of NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Imagery for Modeling the Regional Economy of China Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume (up) 5 Issue 6 Pages 3057-3081  
  Keywords nighttime light; gross regional product; Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite; linear regression  
  Abstract Historically, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) was the unique satellite sensor used to collect the nighttime light, which is an efficient means to map the global economic activities. Since it was launched in October 2011, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Satellite has become a new satellite used to monitor nighttime light. This study performed the first evaluation on the NPP-VIIRS nighttime light imagery in modeling economy, analyzing 31 provincial regions and 393 county regions in China. For each region, the total nighttime light (TNL) and gross regional product (GRP) around the year of 2010 were derived, and a linear regression model was applied on the data. Through the regression, the TNL from NPP-VIIRS were found to exhibit R2 values of 0.8699 and 0.8544 with the provincial GRP and county GRP, respectively, which are significantly stronger than the relationship between the TNL from DMSP-OLS (F16 and F18 satellites) and GRP. Using the regression models, the GRP was predicted from the TNL for each region, and we found that the NPP-VIIRS data is more predictable for the GRP than those of the DMSP-OLS data. This study demonstrates that the recently released NPP-VIIRS nighttime light imagery has a stronger capacity in modeling regional economy than those of the DMSP-OLS data. These findings provide a foundation to model the global and regional economy with the recently availability of the NPP-VIIRS data, especially in the regions where economic census data is difficult to access.  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 201  
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Author Anisimov, V.N.; Vinogradova, I.A.; Panchenko, A.V.; Popovich, I.G.; Zabezhinskii, M.A. url  openurl
  Title Light-at-Night-Induced Circadian Disruption, Cancer and Aging Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Current Aging Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (up) 5 Issue 3 Pages 170-177  
  Keywords Animals; Light-at-night; aging; cancer; cardiovascular diseases; circadian; circadian rhythm; diabetes; disruption; melatonin; shift-work  
  Abstract Light-at-night has become an increasing and essential part of the modern lifestyle and leads to a number of health problems, including excessive body mass index, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Working Group concluded that “shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A) [1]. According to the circadian disruption hypothesis, light-at-night might disrupt the endogenous circadian rhythm and specifically suppress nocturnal production of the pineal hormone melatonin and its secretion into the blood. We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span, and spontaneous and chemical carcinogenesis in rodents. Exposure to constant illumination was followed by accelerated aging and enhanced spontaneous tumorigenesis in female CBA and transgenic HER-2/neu mice. In male and female rats maintained at various light/dark regimens (standard 12:12 light/dark [LD], the natural light [NL] of northwestern Russia, constant light [LL], and constant darkness [DD]) from the age of 25 days until natural death, it was found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated age-related switch-off of the estrous function (in females), induced development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, and shortened life span both in male and females rats compared to the standard LD regimen. Melatonin given in nocturnal drinking water prevented the adverse effect of the constant illumination (LL) and natural light (NL) regimens on the homeostasis, life span, and tumor development both in mice and rats. The exposure to the LL regimen accelerated colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats, whereas the treatment with melatonin alleviated the effects of LL. The maintenance of rats at the DD regimen inhibited DMH-induced carcinogenesis. The LL regimen accelerated, whereas the DD regimen inhibited both mammary carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosomethylurea and transplacental carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosoethylurea in rats. Treatment with melatonin prevented premature aging and tumorigenesis in rodents. The data found in the literature and our observations suggest that the use of melatonin would be effective for cancer prevention in humans at risk as a result of light pollution.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 377  
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Author Lacoeuilhe, A.; Machon, N.; Julien, J.-F.; Le Bocq, A.; Kerbiriou, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The influence of low intensities of light pollution on bat communities in a semi-natural context Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume (up) 9 Issue 10 Pages e103042  
  Keywords Animals; mammals; Vertebrates; bats; light pollution; foraging strategy  
  Abstract Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasingly significant issue worldwide. Over the past century, the use of artificial lighting has increased in association with human activity. Artificial lights are suspected to have substantial effects on the ecology of many species, e.g., by producing discontinuities in the territories of nocturnal animals. We analyzed the potential influence of the intensity and type of artificial light on bat activity in a semi-natural landscape in France. We used a species approach, followed by a trait-based approach, to light sensitivity. We also investigated whether the effect of light could be related to foraging traits. We performed acoustic surveys at sites located along a gradient of light intensities to assess the activity of 15 species of bats. We identified 2 functional response groups of species: one group that was light-tolerant and one group that was light-intolerant. Among the species in the latter group that appear to be disadvantaged by lighting conditions, many are rare and threatened in Europe, whereas the species from the former group are better able to thrive in disturbed habitats such as lighted areas and may actually benefit from artificial lighting. Finally, several methods of controlling light pollution are suggested for the conservation of bat communities. Recommendations for light management and the creation of dim-light corridors are proposed; these strategies may play an important role in protecting against the impact of light pollution on nocturnal animals.  
  Address National Museum of Natural History, Ecology and Sciences Conservation Center, CESCO-UMR7204 MNHN-CNRS-UPMC, Paris, France  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:25360638; PMCID:PMC4215844 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1066  
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Author Vandewalle, G.; Maquet, P.; Dijk, D.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light as a modulator of cognitive brain function Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Trends in Cognitive Sciences Abbreviated Journal Trends Cogn Sci  
  Volume (up) 13 Issue 10 Pages 429-438  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Brain/anatomy & histology/*physiology; Brain Mapping; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cognition/*physiology; Diagnostic Imaging/methods; Humans; *Light; Melatonin/metabolism; Retina/anatomy & histology/physiology; Visual Pathways/anatomy & histology/physiology  
  Abstract Humans are a diurnal species usually exposed to light while engaged in cognitive tasks. Light not only guides performance on these tasks through vision but also exerts non-visual effects that are mediated in part by recently discovered retinal ganglion cells maximally sensitive to blue light. We review recent neuroimaging studies which demonstrate that the wavelength, duration and intensity of light exposure modulate brain responses to (non-visual) cognitive tasks. These responses to light are initially observed in alertness-related subcortical structures (hypothalamus, brainstem, thalamus) and limbic areas (amygdala and hippocampus), followed by modulations of activity in cortical areas, which can ultimately affect behaviour. Light emerges as an important modulator of brain function and cognition.  
  Address Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liege, 8 Allee du 6 Aout, Batiment B30, B-4000 Liege, Belgium. gilles.vandewalle@umontreal.ca  
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  ISSN 1364-6613 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:19748817 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 830  
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Author Kelber, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light intensity limits foraging activity in nocturnal and crepuscular bees Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology  
  Volume (up) 17 Issue 1 Pages 63-72  
  Keywords bees; eyes; foraging; insects; ocelli; sensitivity; visual ecology  
  Abstract A crepuscular or nocturnal lifestyle has evolved in bees several times independently, probably to explore rewarding pollen sources without competition and to minimize predation and nest parasites. Despite these obvious advantages, only few bee species are nocturnal. Here we show that the sensitivity of the bee apposition eye is a major factor limiting the ability to forage in dim light. We present data on eye size, foraging times, and light levels for Megalopta genalis (Augochlorini, Halictidae) in Panama, and Lasioglossum (Sphecodogastra) sp. (Halictini, Halictidae) in Utah, USA. M. genalis females forage exclusively during twilight, but as a result of dim light levels in the rain forest, they are adapted to extremely low intensities. The likely factor limiting their foraging activity is finding their nest entrance on return from a foraging trip. The lowest light intensity at which they can do this, both in the morning and the evening, is 0.0001 cd m−2. Therefore, they leave the nest at dimmer light levels in the morning than in the evening. Lasioglossum (Sphecodogastra) foraging is limited by light intensity in the evening, but probably by temperature in the morning in the temperate climate of Utah. We propose that the evolution of nocturnality in bees was favored by the large variance in the size of females.  
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  ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 119  
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