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Author Jones, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spillover health effects of energy efficiency investments: Quasi-experimental evidence from the Los Angeles LED streetlight program Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Economics and Management Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Economics and Management  
  Volume 88 Issue Pages 283-299  
  Keywords Human Health; LED; public health; outdoor lighting; Los Angeles; economics; energy efficiency; breast cancer; fossil fuel carbon emissions  
  Abstract Payback estimates of energy efficiency investments often ignore public health externalities. This is problematic in cases where spillover health effects are substantial, such as when the application of new technology alters environmental exposures. When health externalities are included in return on investment calculations, energy efficiency programs may look more or less attractive than suggested by conventional “energy savings only” estimates. This analysis exploits the quasi-experiment provided by the 2009 Los Angeles (LA) LED streetlight efficiency program to investigate the returns on investments inclusive of an originally estimated health externality. Using the synthetic control method, we find that the LED streetlight program is associated with a lagged increase in breast cancer mortality of 0.479 per 100,000. Inclusive of the effects of LEDs on breast cancer and avoided carbon emissions, the LA LED program provides a −146.2% 10-year return compared to +118.2% when health outcomes and carbon emissions are ignored.  
  Address Department of Economics, University of New Mexico, 1 UNM Drive, MSC 05 3060, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA; bajones(at)unm.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0095-0696 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1976  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Anbalagan, M.; Dauchy, R.; Xiang, S.; Robling, A.; Blask, D.; Rowan, B.; Hill, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title SAT-337 Disruption Of The Circadian Melatonin Signal By Dim Light At Night Promotes Bone-lytic Breast Cancer Metastases Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of the Endocrine Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue Supplement_1 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Cancer; Breast cancer; melatonin; shift work; mouse models  
  Abstract Breast cancer metastasis to bone is a major source of morbidity and mortality in women with advanced metastatic breast cancer. Morbidity from metastasis to bone is compounded by the fact that they cannot be surgically removed and can only be treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Thus, there is critical need to develop new treatment strategies that kill bone metastatic tumors and reduce osteolytic lesions to improve patient quality of life and extend patient survival. Circadian rhythms are daily cycles of ~24 h that control many if not most physiologic processes and their disruption by exposure to light at night (LAN) or jet lag has been shown to be strongly associated with the development of cancer, particularly breast cancer. We have found that disruption of the anti-cancer circadian hormone melatonin (MLT) by light at night can significantly enhance the metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Our work supports the report of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that shift work is a “probable human carcinogen” and highlights the association between exposure to light at night and invasive breast cancer. We recently reported that human breast tumor xenografts grown in athymic nude female rats housed in a photoperiod of 12h light at day: 12h dim light at night (dLAN, 0.2 lux – blocks the nighttime circadian MLT signal), display resistance to doxorubicin (Dox). More importantly, tumor growth and drug resistance could be blocked by the administration of Dox in circadian alignment with nocturnal MLT during dLAN. Our recent preliminary studies show that poorly invasive ERα positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, when injected into the tibia (to mimic bone metastatic disease) of Foxn1nu athymic nude mice (which produce a strong circadian nighttime melatonin signal) housed in a dLAN photoperiod (suppressed nocturnal MLT production) developed full blown breast cancer tumors in bone (P<0.05) that are highly osteolytic (P<0.05). Moreover, patients with metastatic breast cancer are routinely treated with doxorubicin, which itself can promote bone damage. Our studies demonstrate that MLT slows the growth of metastatic breast cancer in bone but that the chrono-therapeutic use of doxorubicin in circadian alignment with melatonin in Foxn1nu mice with tibial breast tumors, reduced tumor growth in bone, reduced bone erosion, and promoted the formation of new bone. Successful use of this chronotherapeutic use of Dox and MLT in clinical trials increasing efficacy in preventing or suppressing breast cancer metastasis to bone while decreasing toxic side effects of doxorubicin would provide a revolutionary advancement in the treatment of bone metastatic breast cancer and decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer metastasis to bone.  
  Address Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2472-1972 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2433  
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Author Leung, J.M.; Martinez, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian Rhythms in Environmental Health Sciences Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Current Environmental Health Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Environ Health Rep  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Review; Human Health; Asthma; Biomarkers; Breast cancer; Circadian rhythms; DNA methylation; Environmental health  
  Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review aims to explore how circadian rhythms influence disease susceptibility and potentially modify the effect of environmental exposures. We aimed to identify biomarkers commonly used in environmental health research that have also been the subject of chronobiology studies, in order to review circadian rhythms of relevance to environmental health and determine if time-of-day is an important factor to consider in environmental health studies. Moreover, we discuss opportunities for studying how environmental exposures may interact with circadian rhythms to structure disease pathology and etiology. RECENT FINDINGS: In recent years, the study of circadian rhythms in mammals has flourished. Animal models revealed that all body tissues have circadian rhythms. In humans, circadian rhythms were also shown to exist at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, and physiological processes, including responding to oxidative stress, cell trafficking, and sex hormone production, respectively. Together, these rhythms are an essential component of human physiology and can shape an individual's susceptibility and response to disease. Circadian rhythms are relatively unexplored in environmental health research. However, circadian clocks control many physiological and behavioral processes that impact exposure pathways and disease systems. We believe this review will motivate new studies of (i) the impact of exposures on circadian rhythms, (ii) how circadian rhythms modify the effect of environmental exposures, and (iii) how time-of-day impacts our ability to observe the body's response to exposure.  
  Address Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, Room 16-421C, New York, NY, USA. mem2352@cumc.columbia.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2196-5412 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32662059 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3055  
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Author Xiao, Q.; James, P.; Breheny, P.; Jia, P.; Park, Y.; Zhang, D.; Fisher, J.A.; Ward, M.H.; Jones, R.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in the NIH-AARP diet and health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; circadian disruption; outdoor light at night; postmenopausal breast cancer; prospective cohort  
  Abstract Circadian disruption may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. Previous studies reported relationships between outdoor light at night (LAN) and the breast cancer risk, but their findings are mixed. There is also a need to examine LAN and breast cancer incidence according to different individual and environmental characteristics to identify subpopulations at greater risk associated with LAN exposure. We studied residential outdoor LAN estimated from satellite imagery at baseline (1996) in relation to postmenopausal breast cancer incidence over ~16 years of follow-up in 186 981 postmenopausal women including 12 318 incident postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the relationship between quintiles of LAN and postmenopausal breast cancer risk, overall and by hormone receptor status and cancer stage. We found that when compared to women in the lowest quintile of baseline LAN, those in the highest quintile had a 10% increase in postmenopausal breast cancer risk (HR (95% CI), 1.10 (1.02, 1.18), P-trend, .002). The association appeared to be stronger for estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer (1.12 [1.02, 1.24], .007) than for ER-negative cancer (1.07 [0.85, 1.34], .66). Our findings also suggested that the relationship between LAN and breast cancer risk may differ by individual characteristics, such as smoking, alcohol drinking, sleep duration and BMI, and neighborhood environment. In conclusion, our study suggests that higher outdoor LAN exposure may be a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer.  
  Address Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32488897 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2976  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ritonja, J.; McIsaac, M.A.; Sanders, E.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Grundy, A.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Spinelli, J.J.; Aronson, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night at residences and breast cancer risk in Canada Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Breast cancer; Case-control study; Circadian disruption; Light at night; Night work; Women's health  
  Abstract Experimental and epidemiologic studies suggest that light at night (LAN) exposure disrupts circadian rhythm, and this disruption may increase breast cancer risk. We investigated the potential association between residential outdoor LAN and breast cancer risk. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia and Kingston, Ontario, Canada with incident breast cancer cases, and controls frequency matched by age in the same region. This analysis was restricted to 844 cases and 905 controls who provided lifetime residential histories. Using time-weighted average duration at each home 5-20 years prior to study entry, two measures of cumulative average outdoor LAN were calculated using two satellite data sources. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between outdoor LAN and breast cancer risk, considering interactions for menopausal status and night shift work. We found no association between residential outdoor LAN and breast cancer for either measure of LAN [OR comparing highest vs. lowest tertile (DNB) = 0.95, 95% CI 0.70-1.27]. We also found no association when considering interactions for menopausal status and past/current night work status. These findings were robust to changes to years of residential data considered, residential mobility, and longer exposure windows. Our findings are consistent with studies reporting that outdoor LAN has a small effect or no effect on breast cancer risk.  
  Address Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Cancer Research Institute, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. aronson@queensu.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32026169 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2826  
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