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Author Henderson, J.V.; Storeygard, A.; Weil, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measuring Economic Growth From Outer Space Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The American Economic Review Abbreviated Journal Am Econ Rev  
  Volume 102 Issue 2 Pages 994-1028  
  Keywords satellite data; remote sensing; economics; social science  
  Abstract GDP growth is often measured poorly for countries and rarely measured at all for cities or subnational regions. We propose a readily available proxy: satellite data on lights at night. We develop a statistical framework that uses lights growth to augment existing income growth measures, under the assumption that measurement error in using observed light as an indicator of income is uncorrelated with measurement error in national income accounts. For countries with good national income accounts data, information on growth of lights is of marginal value in estimating the true growth rate of income, while for countries with the worst national income accounts, the optimal estimate of true income growth is a composite with roughly equal weights. Among poor-data countries, our new estimate of average annual growth differs by as much as 3 percentage points from official data. Lights data also allow for measurement of income growth in sub- and supranational regions. As an application, we examine growth in Sub Saharan African regions over the last 17 years. We find that real incomes in non-coastal areas have grown faster by 1/3 of an annual percentage point than coastal areas; non-malarial areas have grown faster than malarial ones by 1/3 to 2/3 annual percent points; and primate city regions have grown no faster than hinterland areas. Such applications point toward a research program in which “empirical growth” need no longer be synonymous with “national income accounts.”  
  Address National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Economic Association Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-8282 ISBN Medium  
  Area (up) Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25067841; PMCID:PMC4108272 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 364  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hölker, F.; Moss, T.; Griefahn, B.; Kloas, W.; Voigt, C.; et al. url  openurl
  Title The Dark Side of Light: A Transdisciplinary Research Agenda for Light Pollution Policy Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Ecol Soc Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Ecology; artificial light; energy efficiency; lighting concept; light pollution; nightscape; policy; sustainability; transdisciplinary  
  Abstract Although the invention and widespread use of artificial light is clearly one of the most important human technological advances, the transformation of nightscapes is increasingly recognized as having adverse effects. Night lighting may have serious physiological consequences for humans, ecological and evolutionary implications for animal and plant populations, and may reshape entire ecosystems. However, knowledge on the adverse effects of light pollution is vague. In response to climate change and energy shortages, many countries, regions, and communities are developing new lighting programs and concepts with a strong focus on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. Given the dramatic increase in artificial light at night (0 – 20% per year, depending on geographic region), we see an urgent need for light pollution policies that go beyond energy efficiency to include human well-being, the structure and functioning of ecosystems, and inter-related socioeconomic consequences. Such a policy shift will require a sound transdisciplinary understanding of the significance of the night, and its loss, for humans and the natural systems upon which we depend. Knowledge is also urgently needed on suitable lighting technologies and concepts which are ecologically, socially, and economically sustainable. Unless managing darkness becomes an integral part of future conservation and lighting policies, modern society may run into a global self-experiment with unpredictable outcomes.  
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  Area (up) Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 478  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Farahat, A.; Florea, A.; Martinez Lastra, J.L.; Branas, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Energy Efficiency Considerations for LED-based Lighting of Multipurpose Outdoor Environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensingournal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics Abbreviated Journal IEEE J. Emerging and Sel. Topics in Power Elec.  
  Volume PP Issue 99 Pages 1  
  Keywords Lighting; LED lighting; LED; optimization; lighting technology; lighting design; energy; energy efficiency  
  Abstract Nowadays street lighting accounts for 53% of outdoor lighting use and the market is continuously increasing. In the context of rising energy prices and growing environmental awareness, energy efficiency is becoming one of the most important criteria for street lighting systems design. LED-based lights have become the primary option for replacing conventional light bulbs, being digitally controllable, small, highly efficient, and cheap to manufacture. Advanced control strategies adapted to ambient conditions are needed to combine low energy consumption and high quality light ambience according to changing specifications. This paper describes an outdoor lighting solution aimed at energy efficient performance in the context of multipurpose outdoor environments, where control is crucial in achieving efficiency improvements. The work addresses efficiency at the component level, by optimizing the performance of LED drivers, and at system level, defining the control strategy and associated hardware infrastructure. The approach designed was tested in a real environment. The performance of the lighting installation was assessed using the web-based monitoring application, providing real-time consumption information and aggregated historical data.  
  Address University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.(Email: ahmed.amr.b@gmail.com)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IEEE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-6777 ISBN Medium  
  Area (up) Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1205  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Eisenstein, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Chronobiology: stepping out of time Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 497 Issue 7450 Pages S10-2  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Benzofurans/therapeutic use; CLOCK Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Circadian Rhythm/genetics/*physiology; Cyclopropanes/therapeutic use; Efficiency/physiology; Humans; Melatonin/agonists/metabolism; Obesity/metabolism; Sleep/genetics/*physiology; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/metabolism  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area (up) Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23698500 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 500  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chamorro, E.; Bonnin-Arias, C.; Perez-Carrasco, M.J.; Munoz de Luna, J.; Vazquez, D.; Sanchez-Ramos, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Photochemistry and Photobiology Abbreviated Journal Photochem Photobiol  
  Volume 89 Issue 2 Pages 468-473  
  Keywords Human Health; Apoptosis/*radiation effects; Biological Markers/metabolism; Caspases/metabolism; Cell Survival/radiation effects; DNA Damage; Epithelial Cells/cytology/metabolism/*radiation effects; Histones/metabolism; Humans; Light; Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial/*radiation effects; Mitochondria/*radiation effects; Photoperiod; Primary Cell Culture; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Retinal Pigment Epithelium/cytology/metabolism/*radiation effects  
  Abstract Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC.  
  Address Neuro-Computing and Neuro-Robotics Research Group, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. eva.chamorro@opt.ucm.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-8655 ISBN Medium  
  Area (up) Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22989198 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 511  
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