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Author Stone, T.
Title Light Pollution: A Case Study in Framing an Environmental Problem Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Ethics, Policy & Environment Abbreviated Journal Ethics, Policy & Environment
Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 279-293
Keywords Society
Abstract Light pollution is a topic gaining importance and acceptance in environmental discourse. This concept provides a framework for categorizing the adverse effects of nighttime lighting, which advocacy groups and regulatory efforts are increasingly utilizing. However, the ethical significance of the concept has, thus far, received little critical reflection. In this paper, I analyze the moral implications of framing issues in nighttime lighting via the concept of light pollution. First, the moral and political importance of problem framing is discussed. Next, the origins and contemporary understandings of light pollution are presented. Finally, the normative limitations and practical ambiguities of light pollution are discussed, with the aim of strengthening the framework through which decisions about urban nighttime lighting strategies are increasingly approached.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2155-0085 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2226
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Author Clayson, Hollis
Title Illuminated Paris, Essays on Art and Lighting in the Belle Époque Type Book Whole
Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords History; Society; Art
Abstract The City of Light. For many, these four words instantly conjure late nineteenth-century Paris and the garish colors of Toulouse-Lautrec’s iconic posters. More recently, the Eiffel Tower’s nightly show of sparkling electric lights has come to exemplify our fantasies of Parisian nightlife. Though we reflect longingly on such scenes, in Illuminated Paris, Hollis Clayson shows that there’s more to these clichés than meets the eye. In this richly illustrated book, she traces the dramatic evolution of lighting in Paris and how artists responded to the shifting visual and cultural scenes that resulted from these technologies. While older gas lighting produced a haze of orange, new electric lighting was hardly an improvement: the glare of experimental arc lights—themselves dangerous—left figures looking pale and ghoulish. As Clayson shows, artists’ representations of these new colors and shapes reveal turn-of-the-century concerns about modernization as electric lighting came to represent the harsh glare of rapidly accelerating social change. At the same time, in part thanks to American artists visiting the city, these works of art also produced our enduring romantic view of Parisian glamour and its Belle Époque.
Address Chicago
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Chicago Press Place of Publication Chicago Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 9780226593869 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2231
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Author Entwistle, J.; Slater, D.
Title Making space for 'the social': connecting sociology and professional practices in urban lighting design Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The British Journal of Sociology Abbreviated Journal Br J Sociol
Volume 70 Issue 5 Pages 2020-2041
Keywords Sociology; Society; Lighting
Abstract Lighting is increasingly recognized as a significant social intervention by both lighting professionals and academic social scientists. However, what counts as 'the social' is diverse and contested, with consequences for what kind of 'social' is performed or invented. Based on a long-term research programme, we argue that collaboration between sociologists and lighting professionals requires negotiating discourses and practices of 'the social'. This paper explores the quality and kinds of spaces made for 'the social' in professional practices and academic collaborations, focusing on two case studies of urban lighting that demonstrate how the space of 'the social' is constrained and impoverished by an institutionalized division between technical and aesthetic lighting. We consider the potential role of sociologists in making more productive spaces for 'the social' in urban design, as part of the central sociological task of 'inventing the social' (Marres, Guggenheim and Wilkie 2018) in the process of studying it.
Address Department of Sociology, London School of Economics; d.slater(at)lse.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-1315 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30864152 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2265
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Author Schulte-Römer, N.; Meier, J.; Dannemann, E.; Söding, M.
Title Lighting Professionals versus Light Pollution Experts? Investigating Views on an Emerging Environmental Concern Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 11 Issue 6 Pages 1696
Keywords Lighting; Society
Abstract Concerns about the potential negative effects of artificial light at night on humans, flora and fauna, were originally raised by astronomers and environmentalists. Yet, we observe a growing interest in what is called light pollution among the general public and in the lighting field. Although lighting professionals are often critical of calling light ‘pollution’, they increasingly acknowledge the problem and are beginning to act accordingly. Are those who illuminate joining forces with those who take a critical stance towards artificial light at night? We explore this question in more detail based on the results of a non-representative worldwide expert survey. In our analysis, we distinguish between “lighting professionals” with occupational backgrounds linked to lighting design and the lighting industry, and “light pollution experts” with mostly astronomy- and environment-related professional backgrounds, and explore their opposing and shared views vis-à-vis issues of light pollution. Our analysis reveals that despite seemingly conflicting interests, lighting professionals and light pollution experts largely agree on the problem definition and problem-solving approaches. However, we see diverging views regarding potential obstacles to light pollution mitigation and associated governance challenges.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2278
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Author Stone, T.; Santoni de Sio, F.; Vermaas, P.E.
Title Driving in the Dark: Designing Autonomous Vehicles for Reducing Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Science and Engineering Ethics Abbreviated Journal Sci Eng Ethics
Volume Issue Pages 1-17
Keywords Society; Darkness; Planning; Public Safety; Design for values
Abstract This paper proposes that autonomous vehicles should be designed to reduce light pollution. In support of this specific proposal, a moral assessment of autonomous vehicles more comprehensive than the dilemmatic life-and-death questions of trolley problem-style situations is presented. The paper therefore consists of two interrelated arguments. The first is that autonomous vehicles are currently still a technology in development, and not one that has acquired its definitive shape, meaning the design of both the vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure is open-ended. Design for values is utilized to articulate a path forward, by which engineering ethics should strive to incorporate values into a technology during its development phase. Second, it is argued that nighttime lighting-a critical supporting infrastructure-should be a prima facie consideration for autonomous vehicles during their development phase. It is shown that a reduction in light pollution, and more boldly a better balance of lighting and darkness, can be achieved via the design of future autonomous vehicles. Two case studies are examined (parking lots and highways) through which autonomous vehicles may be designed for “driving in the dark.” Nighttime lighting issues are thus inserted into a broader ethics of autonomous vehicles, while simultaneously introducing questions of autonomous vehicles into debates about light pollution.
Address Department Ethics/Philosophy of Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1353-3452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30903370 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2277
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