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Author Schulte-Römer, N.
Title Research in the Dark Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Nature and Culture Abbreviated Journal
Volume 14 Issue 2 Pages 215-227
Keywords Society; Review
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1558-6073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2546
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Author Adams, C.A.; Blumenthal, A.; Fernández-Juricic, E.; Bayne, E.; St. Clair, C.C.
Title Effect of anthropogenic light on bird movement, habitat selection, and distribution: a systematic map protocol Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Evidence Abbreviated Journal Environ Evid
Volume 8 Issue S1 Pages 13
Keywords Animals; BirdsDepartment of Biological Science, University of Alberta, CW 405, Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada
Abstract Anthropogenic light is known or suspected to exert profound effects on many taxa, including birds. Documentation of bird aggregation around artificial light at night, as well as observations of bird reactions to strobe lights and lasers, suggests that light may both attract and repel birds, although this assumption has yet to be tested. These effects may cause immediate changes to bird movement, habitat selection and settlement, and ultimately alter bird distribution at large spatial scales. Global increases in the extent of anthropogenic light contribute to interest by wildlife managers and the public in managing light to reduce harm to birds, but there are no evidence syntheses of the multiple ways light affects birds to guide this effort. Existing reviews usually emphasize either bird aggregation or deterrence and do so for a specific context, such as aggregation at communication towers and deterrence from airports. We outline a protocol for a systematic map that collects and organizes evidence from the many contexts in which anthropogenic light is reported to affect bird movement, habitat selection, or distribution. Our map will provide an objective synthesis of the evidence that identifies subtopics that may support systematic review and knowledge gaps that could direct future research questions. These products will substantially advance an understanding of both patterns and processes associated with the responses of birds to anthropogenic light.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2047-2382 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2547
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Author Esaki, Y.; Kitajima, T.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N.
Title Light exposure at night and sleep quality in bipolar disorder: the APPLE cohort study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal Journal of Affective Disorders
Volume 257 Issue Pages 314-320
Keywords Human Health; mood disorders; Bipolar Disorder; Sleep; sleep efficiency; sleep quality
Abstract Background

Sleep disturbance in bipolar disorder (BD) is common and is associated with a risk for mood episode recurrence. Thus, it is important to identify factors that are related to sleep disturbance in BD. This cross-sectional study investigated the association between exposure to light at night (LAN) and sleep parameters in patients with BD.

Methods

The sleep parameters of 175 outpatients with BD were recorded using actigraphy at their homes for seven consecutive nights and were evaluated using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). The average LAN intensity in the bedroom during bedtime and rising time was measured using a portable photometer, and the participants were divided into two groups: “Light” (≥5 lux) and “Dark” (<5 lux). The association between LAN and sleep parameters was tested with multivariable analysis by adjusting for potential confounder such as age, gender, current smoker, mood state, day length, daytime light exposure, and sedative medications.

Results

After adjusting for potential confounder, the actigraphy sleep parameters showed significantly lower sleep efficiency (mean, 80.1% vs. 83.4%; p = 0.01), longer log-transformed sleep onset latency (2.9 vs. 2.6 min; p = 0.01), and greater wake after sleep onset (51.4 vs. 41.6 min; p = 0.02) in the Light group than in the Dark group. Whereas, there were no significant differences in the ISI scores between the groups.

Limitations

This was a cross-sectional study; therefore, the results do not necessarily imply that LAN causes sleep disturbance.

Conclusions

Reducing LAN exposure may contribute to improved sleep quality in patients with BD.
Address Department of Psychiatry, Okehazama Hospital, Aichi, Japan; esakiz(at)fujita-hu.ac.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2561
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Author Henckel, D.
Title Sustainable Governance of the Urban Night Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Nauchni trudove Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue Pages 219-233
Keywords Planning; Society; Sustainability; Conservation
Abstract Since humans are day active primates the differences between day and night seem to be so deeply rooted that a holistic, integrative view of the 24 hours cycle of the city is far from being established. Notwithstanding all the topical talking about the 24/7 city, the analysis of cities and their governance focuses mainly on the day, even if we witness an increasing “colonization of the world after dark” (Melbin, 1987). This extension of activity into the night is producing a growing number of conflicts.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2563
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Author C-Sanchez, E.; Sanchez-Medina, A.J.; Alonso-Hernandez, J.B.; Voltes-Dorta, A.
Title Astrotourism and Night Sky Brightness Forecast: First Probabilistic Model Approach Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 19 Issue 13 Pages 2840
Keywords Society; Astrotourism; Skyglow; night sky brightness; artificial neural networks
Abstract Celestial tourism, also known as astrotourism, astronomical tourism or, less frequently, star tourism, refers to people's interest in visiting places where celestial phenomena can be clearly observed. Stars, skygazing, meteor showers or comets, among other phenomena, arouse people's interest, however, good night sky conditions are required to observe such phenomena. From an environmental point of view, several organisations have surfaced in defence of the protection of dark night skies against light pollution, while from an economic point of view; the idea also opens new possibilities for development in associated areas. The quality of dark skies for celestial tourism can be measured by night sky brightness (NSB), which is used to quantify the visual perception of the sky, including several light sources at a specific point on earth. The aim of this research is to model the nocturnal sky brightness by training and testing a probabilistic model using real NSB data. ARIMA and artificial neural network models have been applied to open NSB data provided by the Globe at Night international programme, with the results of this first model approach being promising and opening up new possibilities for astrotourism. To the best of the authors' knowledge, probabilistic models have not been applied to NSB forecasting.
Address Management Science and Business Economics Group, University of Edinburgh Business School, Edinburgh EH8 9JS, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31247919 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2571
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