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Author Lessard, B.
Title Shot in the Dark: Nocturnal Philosophy and Night Photography Type Book Chapter
Year 2018 Publication Critical Distance in Documentary Media Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 45-67
Keywords Society; Art
Abstract This chapter examines the neglected practice of night photography, and how it critically addresses the environmental, sociohistorical, and urban issues in recent series by Christina Seely, Bruno Lessard, Michel Huneault, and Jeanine Michna-Bales. Drawing on Jacques Derrida, Emmanuel Levinas, and the emerging field of night studies to create a nocturnal philosophy—a dark photology—with which to frame the multifaceted issues at the heart of the series, the author examines the value that these photographic artists place upon night to document light pollution around the world, ongoing urban transformations in China, an environmental catastrophe and its aftermath in Québec, and the landscape of the Underground Railroad in the United States. These four series demonstrate how night photography offers a unique critical perspective on some of the most pressing problems of our age, and how these artists distance themselves from the predominantly diurnal register of documentary media.
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Call Number (up) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2319
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Author Wang, W., & Cao, C.
Title NOAA-20 VIIRS DNB Aggregation Mode Change: Prelaunch Efforts and On-Orbit Verification/Validation Results Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal
Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; Radiometry; Earth; Satellite broadcasting; US Government agencies; Geology; Detectors; VIIRS-DNB
Abstract The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on-board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-20 (NOAA-20, previously named Joint Polar Satellite System-1 or J1) satellite was successfully launched in late 2017, following six years of a successful operation by its predecessor on the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. NOAA-20 VIIRS day/night band (DNB) adopts a new on-board aggregation option (Op21), which is different from S-NPP DNB (using Op32), to mitigate high non-linearity at high scan angles, observed in its radiometric response during prelaunch test. As a result, NOAA-20 VIIRS DNB has a larger scan angle at the end of scan (∼60.5°) and exhibits a unique feature, i.e., ∼600 km extended Earth view (EV) samples, compared to S-NPP DNB and other VIIRS bands. VIIRS geolocation (GEO) algorithm and geometric calibration parameters were analyzed in-depth and subsequently modified to accommodate the NOAA-20 VIIRS DNB aggregation mode change. The GEO code change was tested using S-NPP data; S-NPP DNB simulated J1 DNB radiance and limited J1 prelaunch test data. After the launch, it was further verified using NOAA-20 VIIRS on-orbit observations. Our results show that the prelaunch VIIRS GEO code change performs well. GEO validation results using nighttime point sources show that NOAA-20 DNB GEO errors are comparable to those for S-NPP DNB over the nominal EV range, with averaged nadir equivalent GEO errors less than 200 m after on-bit updates. Over the extended EV samples (scan angle > 56.06°), the averaged GEO errors are less than 500 m. Moreover, NOAA-20 VIIRS DNB radiometric calibration performance is comparable to S-NPP.
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Call Number (up) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2350
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Author Campisi, D.; Gitto, S.; Morea, D.
Title Economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements in street lighting systems in Rome Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 190-198
Keywords Economics; Energy; Society; LED lighting; LED; real options
Abstract This study evaluates an investment project concerning the redevelopment of the public lighting of the Municipality of Rome. In particular, we consider the replacing of the traditional lamps of the system with LED lamps. We consider the factors that affect this kind of project: the cost of energy, the manteinance cost, the investment cost and the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC). Our results underline the reduction of energy consumption and of the maintenance costs, lower emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere, the reduction of light pollution, the positive effects on road safety and the indipendence by incentives.
Address Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy
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Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Call Number (up) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2629
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Author Schulte-Römer, N.
Title What is French about the “French fear of darkness”? The co-production of imagined communities of light and energy Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Energy History Revue d'Histoire de l'Energie Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue Pages
Keywords History; Society; Energy; Lighting; France
Abstract This essay takes expert assumptions about light preferences as a starting point for a historical inquiry into what I call imagined sociotechnical communities of light and energy. My argument is that historical energy supply systems produced these imaginaries and vice versa, shifting the scales at which public lighting was envisioned and darkness was acceptable. While in the 17th C. dark streets were the norm and even the illumination of single streets was publically contested, innovators of the 18th C. imagined gas light and energy on an urban scale. In the 20th C., electric lighting promoted electrification and the electricity supply systems in countries like France allowed experts to think and standardize lighting at a national level. In the 21st C. the expert imaginary of a light-loving French people is challenged by public environmental concern.
Address Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Germany
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Call Number (up) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2709
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Author Pritchard, S.B.
Title Epilogue. Field notes from the end of the world: Light, darkness, Energy, and endscape in polar night Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Energy History Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue Pages
Keywords Darkness; Lighting; Society; Psychology
Abstract This personal essay describes light(s) and darkness(es) in Longyearbyen, Svalbard (Norway) during polar night in January 2019. Drawing on autoethnographic methods, I also seek to describe how I experienced the remarkable lightscapes and darkscapes of the far north during winter. I suggest how the history of energy in Longyearbyen has both shaped and been shaped by the “extreme” light/dark cycle of the high Arctic. In the process, I develop the concept of “endscape” to characterize vestiges of a landscape that has been, and will continue to be, transformed by global climate change, and will eventually disappear. This recent experience illustrates the potential of experiential, reflexive ways of contending with light/dark. It also draws attention to tensions in the academic study of light/dark and the history of energy, and how they play out in practice, in the context of a conference held in a remote location that requires scholars to contribute to the continued extraction of fossil fuels –something that most would otherwise decry. I suggest that Longyearbyen is a useful case study for other endscapes in the early 21st C.
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Call Number (up) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2722
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