|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Bará, S.
Title Light pollution: Why should we care? Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Second International Conference on Applications of Optics and Photonics Manuel Filipe P. C. Martins Costa; Rogério Nunes Nogueira Aveiro, Portugal, 2014 Abbreviated Journal Proc. SPIE 9286
Volume 9286 Issue Pages
Keywords Society; light pollution
Abstract The historical development of lighting technologies has been characterized by what evolution theorists call 'punctuated equilibrium': a succession of long periods of stable development followed by short periods of rapid change when key technological breakthroughs give rise to new lighting paradigms. Nowadays with the massive deployment of LED-based solid state lighting systems the illumination field is undergoing one of such accelerated transformation events. In parallel, a growing body of research has unveiled some of the complex interactions between the daily cycles of light and darkness and the regulating mechanisms of individuals, populations and ecosystems, including humans. This communication addresses some of the challenges that this new situation poses for the development of sustainable lighting systems.
Address Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Spain; salva.bara@usc.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1133
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S.
Title Naked-eye astronomy: optics of the starry night skies Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Proc. SPIE 9289, 12th Education and Training in Optics and Photonics Conference, 2014 Abbreviated Journal Proc. SPIE 9289
Volume 9289 Issue Pages
Keywords Society; light pollution
Abstract The world at night offers a wealth of stimuli and opportunities as a resource for Optics education, at all age levels and from any (formal, non formal or informal) perspective. The starry sky and the urban nightscape provide a unique combination of pointlike sources with extremely different emission spectra and brightness levels on a generally darker, locally homogeneous background. This fact, combined with the particular characteristics of the human visual system under mesopic and scotopic conditions, provides a perfect setting for experiencing first-hand different optical phenomena of increasing levels of complexity: from the eye's point spread function to the luminance contrast threshold for source detection, from basic diffraction patterns to the intricate irradiance fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence. Looking at the nightscape is also a perfect occasion to raise awareness on the increasing levels of light pollution associated to the misuse of public and private artificial light at night, to promote a sustainable use of lighting, and to take part in worldwide citizen science campaigns. Last but not least, night sky observing activities can be planned and developed following a very flexible schedule, allowing individual students to carry them out from home and sharing the results in the classroom as well as organizing social events and night star parties with the active engagement of families and groups of the local community. This contribution describes these possibilities and introduces some of the free resources available to put them in practice.
Address Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Spain; salva.bara@usc.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1134
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Taylor, C.R., Sarkees, M.E.
Title Do bans on illuminated on-premise signs matter? Balancing environmental impact with the impact on businesses Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Advertising: The Review of Marketing Communications Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Advertising Rev. Marketing Comm.
Volume 36 Issue 1 Pages 61-73
Keywords Economics; illuminated signs; advertising; society; policy
Abstract Recent years have seen some US municipalities implementing restrictions on lighted on-premise signs, often based on environmental arguments. At the same time, sign companies and sign users argue that restrictions are harmful to businesses. To date there has not been any research on the degree to which restrictions on illuminated signs are harmful to businesses. To this end, this study reports the results of a nationally representative sample of on-premise sign users which explores the degree to which sign users: (1) rely on the signs to help them perform key marketing functions; and (2) report that these signs impact their bottom line. Findings indicate that respondents strongly agree that lighted on-premise signs perform key marketing functions for them and a majority of respondents believe that restrictions on lighting harm their profitability.
Address Department of Marketing, Villanova School of Business, Villanova University, 19085-1678, Villanova, PA, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1239
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bazell, R.J.
Title Star Bright, Street Light, Which Will They See Tonight? Type Magazine Article
Year 1971 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 171 Issue Pages 461
Keywords Society; light pollution; history; historical
Abstract Astronomers are asking that Tucson modify its outdoor lighting so that their view of the heavens will not be obstructed by the city's nighttime glare. Workers at the five observatories: in the mountains surrounding this rapidly growing city of 300,000 fear that in the future they will be unable to observe certain astronomical phenomena, if the amount of light coming from the city continues to increase.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1257
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smolensky, M.H.; Sackett-Lundeen, L.L.; Portaluppi, F.
Title Nocturnal light pollution and underexposure to daytime sunlight: Complementary mechanisms of circadian disruption and related diseases Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume Issue Pages 1-20
Keywords Human Health; Artificial light at night; cancer; circadian time structure; development and disruption; melatonin; sleep/wake cycle disturbance; sunlight; vitamin D; vitamin D deficiency; circadian time structure; circadian rhythm; desynchrony
Abstract Routine exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) in work, home, and community settings is linked with increased risk of breast and prostate cancer (BC, PC) in normally sighted women and men, the hypothesized biological rhythm mechanisms being frequent nocturnal melatonin synthesis suppression, circadian time structure (CTS) desynchronization, and sleep/wake cycle disruption with sleep deprivation. ALAN-induced perturbation of the CTS melatonin synchronizer signal is communicated maternally at the very onset of life and after birth via breast or artificial formula feedings. Nighttime use of personal computers, mobile phones, electronic tablets, televisions, and the like – now epidemic in adolescents and adults and highly prevalent in pre-school and school-aged children – is a new source of ALAN. However, ALAN exposure occurs concomitantly with almost complete absence of daytime sunlight, whose blue-violet (446-484 nm lambda) spectrum synchronizes the CTS and whose UV-B (290-315 nm lambda) spectrum stimulates vitamin D synthesis. Under natural conditions and clear skies, day/night and annual cycles of UV-B irradiation drive corresponding periodicities in vitamin D synthesis and numerous bioprocesses regulated by active metabolites augment and strengthen the biological time structure. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are widespread in children and adults in developed and developing countries as a consequence of inadequate sunlight exposure. Past epidemiologic studies have focused either on exposure to too little daytime UV-B or too much ALAN, respectively, on vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency or melatonin suppression in relation to risk of cancer and other, e.g., psychiatric, hypertensive, cardiac, and vascular, so-called, diseases of civilization. The observed elevated incidence of medical conditions the two are alleged to influence through many complementary bioprocesses of cells, tissues, and organs led us to examine effects of the totality of the artificial light environment in which humans reside today. Never have chronobiologic or epidemiologic investigations comprehensively researched the potentially deleterious consequences of the combination of suppressed vitamin D plus melatonin synthesis due to life in today's man-made artificial light environment, which in our opinion is long overdue.
Address c Hypertension Center, S. Anna University Hospital, University of Ferrara , Ferrara , Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26374931 Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1271
Permanent link to this record