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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.; Xavia, K.; Bobkowska, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of Citizens’ Actions against Light Pollution with Guidelines for Future Initiatives Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages 4997  
  Keywords Society; History; Conservation; Law; Activism; Education  
  Abstract Due to the wide reach of media reports about scientific research and technological tools such as the world wide web (WWW), the Internet, and web browsers, citizens today have access to factual information about the negative impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) on their dark skies, and their health and well-being. This means they can now make educated decisions and take the necessary steps to help protect themselves and their communities from disruptive light pollution. Whilst this action is positive and welcomed, unfortunately, according to collected data, not all such initiatives have been successful. Although our understanding of this groundswell movement is deepening, further studies are required to complete a worldwide picture of the current situation. This paper therefore investigates the various actions taken by citizens, as well as the challenges, methods, and tools involved, regarding good practices initiated by grass roots activism on how to reduce existing and potential light pollution. The results of a comparative analysis of 262 international case studies (lawsuits and online petitions) reveal that, since the 1990s, there has been an increase in the number of legal cases related to light pollution due to the rise in public awareness, the availability of scientific knowledge via the Internet, and the ability to take accurate lighting measurements and perform lighting simulations. Also, in the last decade a new tool for digital participation in the form of online petitions has established a new movement of citizen action to mitigate the effects of light pollution. Based on this information, a seven-step framework involving recommendations for citizen action has been developed. It is expected that this new knowledge will benefit those citizens planning future efforts involving the development, implementation, and monitoring processes of outdoor lighting. Additionally, it might support the evolution of planning and policy approaches that are sustainable and necessary to improve the application and installation of ecologically/biologically responsible illumination for towns, cities, and natural habitats.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3008  
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Author Kumar, A.; Shaw, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Transforming rural light and dark under planetary urbanisation: Comparing ordinary countrysides in India and the<scp>UK</scp> Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers Abbreviated Journal Trans Inst Br Geogr  
  Volume 45 Issue 1 Pages 155-167  
  Keywords Psychology; Society  
  Abstract Contemporary global lightscapes are becoming increasingly complex and varied, creating an unusual geography of technological development and diffusion that defies many easy narratives of global interconnectivity. Specifically, new LED lighting technologies are being created through rural experimentation in both Global North and Global South. This makes lighting, and darkness, an interesting lens through which to intervene in debates on the relationship between city, countryside, and planet, specifically addressing the theoretical developments of comparative urbanism and planetary urbanisation. Heading calls to develop conceptual material from both Global North and Global South, we use case studies from Bihar (India) and the North Pennines (UK ) to argue that the changing lighting technologies and practices show how “ordinary countrysides” are contributing to new planetary ways of living. We argue that while there are differences in how darkness and the implementation of artificial lighting are perceived in these sites, there are similarities that reveal an ongoing rural form of planetary living, outside the claims of urbanisation. Particularly, rural lives are marked by a closer connection to the planet, as expressed through experiences of rural darkness. Furthermore, in both sites the tenuous grasp on infrastructure and state services seems to reveal a shared rural experience. These findings suggest shared rural experiences of globalisation, but that the socio‐spatial contexts of places remain important in understanding their location within global systems. Furthermore, we join recent calls to suggest that further exploration of the difference between “global” and “planetary” might add nuance to theoretical trends in urban studies, rural studies, and geography.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-2754 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3009  
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Author Nadybal, S.M.; Collins, T.W.; Grineski, S.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution inequities in the continental United States: A distributive environmental justice analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environmental Research  
  Volume 189 Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Planning; Society; Inequality  
  Abstract Excessive exposure to ambient light at night is a well-documented hazard to human health, yet analysts have not examined it from an environmental justice (EJ) perspective. We conducted the first EJ study of exposure to light pollution by testing for socially disparate patterns across the continental United States (US). We first calculated population-weighted mean exposures to examine whether ambient light pollution in the US differed between racial/ethnic groups. We then used multivariable generalized estimating equations (GEEs) that adjust for geographic clustering to examine whether light pollution was distributed inequitably based on racial/ethnic composition and socioeconomic status across US neighborhoods (census tracts). Finally, we conducted a stratified analysis of metropolitan core, suburban, and small city–rural tracts to determine whether patterns of inequity varied based on urban-rural context. We found evidence of disparities in exposures to light pollution based on racial/ethnic minority and low-to-mid socioeconomic statuses. Americans of Asian, Hispanic or Black race/ethnicity had population-weighted mean exposures to light pollution in their neighborhoods that were approximately two times that of White Americans. GEEs indicated that neighborhoods composed of higher proportions of Blacks, Hispanics, Asians, or renter-occupants experienced greater exposures to ambient light at night. Stratified analyses indicated that those patterns of inequity did not substantially vary based on urban-rural context. Findings have implications for understanding environmental influences on health disparities, raise concerns about the potential for a multiple environmental jeopardy situation, and highlight the need for policy actions to address light pollution.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3088  
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Author Kogure, M.; Yue, J.; Nakamura, T.; Hoffmann, L.; Vadas, S.L.; Tomikawa, Y.; Ejiri, M.K.; Janches, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title First Direct Observational Evidence for Secondary Gravity Waves Generated by Mountain Waves Over the Andes Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Geophysical Research Letters Abbreviated Journal Geophys. Res. Lett.  
  Volume 47 Issue 17 Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Atmospheric Science  
  Abstract A mountain wave with a significant brightness temperature amplitude and ~500 km horizontal wavelength was observed over the Andes on 24–25 July 2017 in Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Aqua satellite data. In the Modern‐Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, version 2 (MERRA‐2), reanalysis data, the intense eastward wind flowed over the Andes. Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)/Suomi‐NPP (National Polar‐orbiting Partnership) did not detect the mountain waves; however, it observed concentric ring‐like waves in the nightglow emissions at ~87 km with ~100 km wavelengths on the same night over and leeward of the Southern Andes. A ray tracing analysis showed that the mountain waves propagated to the east of the Andes, where concentric ring‐like waves appeared above a region of mountain wave breaking. Therefore, the concentric ring‐like waves were likely secondary waves generated by momentum deposition that accompanied mountain wave breaking. These results provide the first direct evidence for secondary gravity waves generated by momentum deposition.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0094-8276 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3117  
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Author Derrien, M.M.; Stokowski, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Discursive constructions of night sky experiences: Imagination and imaginaries in national park visitor narratives Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Annals of Tourism Research Abbreviated Journal Annals of Tourism Research  
  Volume 85 Issue Pages 103038  
  Keywords Astrotourism; Society  
  Abstract Communities and protected areas worldwide have initiated programs to protect and promote dark night skies. Yet, limited research has explored how and why night skies become of interest or meaningful to people. Because night skies are literally beyond human reach, we focus on how visitors to a U.S. national park imagine night skies and invoke imaginaries that make night skies meaningful. Drawing from interviews, we examine how visitors use symbolic language, narrative, and other discursive practices to develop the social, cultural, and spatial contexts of their night sky experiences. Findings inform our understanding of imagination and imaginaries in tourism and recreation research, while offering new approaches to night skies research.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0160-7383 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3118  
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