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Author Özyürek, C.; Aydin, G.
Title Students’ Opinions on the Light Pollution Application Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education Abbreviated Journal IEJEE
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 55-68
Keywords Society; awareness; perception; education; child development; light pollution
Abstract The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of computer-animated concept cartoons and outdoor science activities on creating awareness among seventh graders about light pollution. It also aims to identify the views of the students on the activities that were carried out. This study used one group pre-test/post-test experimental design model with 30 seventh graders. The data in the study were collected via open-ended questions on light pollution and semi-structured interview questions. The open-ended questions on light pollution were administered as a pre-test and a post-test. After the post-test was administered, semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven students. The data collected from the open-ended questions and semi-structured interviews were qualitatively analysed and quotes from the students’ statements were included. Looking at the answers of the students to questions on light pollution, it was understood that the activities that were carried out were effective. Furthermore, all of the students that were interviewed made positive statements about the activities that were carried out.
Address Ordu University, Turkey
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher T&K Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition (up)
ISSN 1307-9298 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1288
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Author Román, M.O.; Stokes, E.C.
Title Holidays in lights: Tracking cultural patterns in demand for energy services: TRACKING CULTURAL PATTERNS IN DEMAND FOR ENERGY SERVICES Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Earth's Future Abbreviated Journal Earth's Future
Volume 3 Issue 6 Pages 182-205
Keywords remote sensing, energy, lighting, society
Abstract Successful climate change mitigation will involve not only technological innovation, but also innovation in how we understand the societal and individual behaviors that shape the demand for energy services. Traditionally, individual energy behaviors have been described as a function of utility optimization and behavioral economics, with price restructuring as the dominant policy lever. Previous research at the macro-level has identified economic activity, power generation and technology, and economic role as significant factors that shape energy use. However, most demand models lack basic contextual information on how dominant social phenomenon, the changing demographics of cities, and the sociocultural setting within which people operate, affect energy decisions and use patterns. Here we use high-quality Suomi-NPP VIIRS nighttime environmental products to: (1) observe aggregate human behavior through variations in energy service demand patterns during the Christmas and New Year's season and the Holy Month of Ramadan and (2) demonstrate that patterns in energy behaviors closely track sociocultural boundaries at the country, city, and district level. These findings indicate that energy decision making and demand is a sociocultural process as well as an economic process, often involving a combination of individual price-based incentives and societal-level factors. While nighttime satellite imagery has been used to map regional energy infrastructure distribution, tracking daily dynamic lighting demand at three major scales of urbanization is novel. This methodology can enrich research on the relative importance of drivers of energy demand and conservation behaviors at fine scales. Our initial results demonstrate the importance of seating energy demand frameworks in a social context.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition (up)
ISSN 2328-4277 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1296
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Author Mège, P.; Ödeen, A.; Théry, M.; Picard, D.; Secondi, J.
Title Partial Opsin Sequences Suggest UV-Sensitive Vision is Widespread in Caudata Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Evolutionary Biology Abbreviated Journal Evol. Biol.
Volume Issue Pages 1-10
Keywords Animals; Caudata; amphibians; ultraviolet; ultraviolet vision; opsin; photobiology; SWS1; Paralog gene; Tuning site; Nocturnal species; Sliding window; Ka/Ks
Abstract Ultraviolet (UV) vision exists in several animal groups. Intuitively, one would expect this trait to be favoured in species living in bright environments, where UV light is the most present. However, UV sensitivity, as deduced from sequences of UV photoreceptors and/or ocular media transmittance, is also present in nocturnal species, raising questions about the selective pressure maintaining this perceptual ability. Amphibians are among the most nocturnal vertebrates but their visual ecology remains poorly understood relative to other groups. Perhaps because many of these species breed in environments that filter out a large part of UV radiation, physiological and behavioural studies of UV sensitivity in this group are scarce. We investigated the extent of UV vision in Caudata, the order of amphibians with the most nocturnal habits. We could recover sequences of the UV sensitive SWS1 opsin in 40 out of 58 species, belonging to 6 families. In all of these species, the evidence suggests the presence of functional SWS1 opsins under purifying selection, potentially allowing UV vision. Interestingly, most species whose opsin genes failed to amplify exhibited particular ecological features that could drive the loss of UV vision. This likely wide distribution of functional UV photoreceptors in Caudata sheds a new light on the visual ecology of amphibians and questions the function of UV vision in nocturnal animal species.
Address GECCO, Université d’Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045, Angers, France; pascal.mege(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition (up)
ISSN 0071-3260 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1299
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Author Leskey, T.; Lee, D.-H.; Glenn, D.; Morrison, W.
Title Behavioral Responses of the Invasive Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) to Light-Based Stimuli in the Laboratory and Field Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Insect Behavior Abbreviated Journal J. of Insect Behav.
Volume 28 Issue 6 Pages 674-692
Keywords Animals; Brown marmorated stink bug; light trap; visual ecology; IPM; wavelength; Halyomorpha halys; invasive species
Abstract Halyomorpha halys (Stål), brown marmorated stink bug, is an invasive insect native to Asia that was accidentally introduced into the United States. The species is a polyphagous pest that has caused serious economic injury to specialty and row crops in the mid-Atlantic region. Growers have targeted H. halys with broad-spectrum materials by increasing the number of and decreasing the interval between insecticide applications. While it is known that adults reliably respond to semiochemical cues, much less is known about the response of H. halys to visual stimuli. Field observations suggest that H. halys adults respond to light-based stimuli, with large aggregations of adults documented at outdoor light sources and captured in commercial blacklight traps. Therefore, we conducted a series of studies aimed at identifying optimal wavelengths and intensities of light attractive to H. halys adults. We found that intensity and wavelength of light affected H. halys response in the laboratory and field. In the laboratory, H. halys demonstrated positive phototactic responses to full-spectrum and wavelength-restricted stimuli at a range of intensities, though the levels of stimulus acceptance and attraction, respectively, changed according to intensity. The species is most attracted to white, blue and black (ultraviolet) wavelength-restricted stimuli in the laboratory and field. In the field, traps baited with blue light sources were less attractive to non-target insect species, but white light sources were more attractive to H. halys indicating that these two light sources may be good candidates for inclusion in light-based monitoring traps.
Address USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 2217 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV, 25430-2771, USA; tracy.leskey(at)ars.usda.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition (up)
ISSN 0892-7553 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1300
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Author Bach, S.; usanne; Degenring, F. (eds)
Title Dark Nights, Bright Lights: Night, Darkness, and Illumination in Literature Type Book Whole
Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Society; literature; art
Abstract Light and darkness shape our perception of the world. This is true in a literal sense, but also metaphorically: in theology, philosophy, literature and the arts the light of day signifies life, safety, knowledge and all that is good, while the darkness of the night suggests death, danger, ignorance and evil.

A closer inspection, however, reveals that things are not quite so clear cut and that light and darkness cannot be understood as simple binary opposites. On a biological level, for example, daylight and darkness are inseparable factors in the calibration of our circadian rhythms, and a lack of periodical darkness appears to be as contrary to health as a lack of exposure to sunlight. On a cultural level, too, night and darkness are far from being universally condemnable: in fiction, drama and poetry the darkness of the night allows not only nightmares but also dreams, it allows criminals to ply their trade and allows lovers to meet, it allows the pursuit of pleasure as well as deep thought, it allows metamorphoses, transformations and transgressions unthinkable in the light of day. But night is not merely darkness. The night gains significance as an alternative space, as an ‘other of the day’, only when it is at least partially illuminated.

The volume examines the interconnection of night, darkness and nocturnal illumination across a broad range of literary texts. The individual essays examine historically specific light conditions in literature, tracing the symbolic and metaphoric content of darkness and illumination and the attitudes towards them.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher De Gruyter Place of Publication Editor Bach, S.; usanne; Degenring, F.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Anglia Book Series Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume 50 Series Issue Edition (up)
ISSN ISBN 978-3-11-041529-2 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1308
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