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Author Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.-X.; Korkmaz, A.; Ma, S.
Title Obesity and metabolic syndrome: association with chronodisruption, sleep deprivation, and melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med
Volume 44 Issue 6 Pages (down) 564-577
Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Animals; Child; Chronobiology Disorders/*epidemiology; Comorbidity; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Light/adverse effects; Melatonin/*deficiency/physiology; Metabolic Syndrome X/*epidemiology; Mice; Obesity/*epidemiology; Rats; Sleep Deprivation/*epidemiology
Abstract Obesity has become an epidemic in industrialized and developing countries. In 30 years, unless serious changes are made, a majority of adults and many children will be classified as overweight or obese. Whereas fatness alone endangers physiological performance of even simple tasks, the associated co-morbidity of obesity including metabolic syndrome in all its manifestations is a far more critical problem. If the current trend continues as predicted, health care systems may be incapable of handling the myriad of obesity-related diseases. The financial costs, including those due to medical procedures, absenteeism from work, and reduced economic productivity, will jeopardize the financial well-being of industries. The current review summarizes the potential contributions of three processes that may be contributing to humans becoming progressively more overweight: circadian or chronodisruption, sleep deficiency, and melatonin suppression. Based on the information provided in this survey, life-style factors (independent of the availability of abundant calorie-rich foods) may aggravate weight gain. Both epidemiological and experimental data support associations between disrupted physiological rhythms, a reduction in adequate sleep, and light-at-night-induced suppression of an essential endogenously produced molecule, melatonin. The implication is that if these problems were corrected with life-style changes, body-weight could possibly be more easily controlled.
Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UT Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA. reiter@uthscsa.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21668294 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 523
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Author Labuda, M., Pavličková, K., Števová, J.
Title Dark Sky Parks – new impulse for nature tourism development in protected areas (National Park Muranska Planina, Slovakia) Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication e-Review of Tourism Research Abbreviated Journal eRTR
Volume 13 Issue 5/6 Pages (down) 536-549
Keywords Society; tourism; astrotourism; sustainable tourism; dark sky parks
Abstract Dark Sky Parks are one of important measures to support nature tourism in the protected

areas. In this paper, we introduce the concept of astro-tourism on the model area of National Park Muranska Planina (Slovakia), which should lead to the establishment of Dark Sky Park and the implementation of measures focused on dark sky protection, i.e. the elimination of light pollution over model area. The concept includes the measurement of night sky brightness, the selection of suitable observational sites and lighting plan. It is very important from the view of ecology, e.g. by the protection of night animal species. On the other hand, these characteristics can be fully used in new tourism concept in that protected area.
Address Department of Landscape Ecology, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia; mlabuda(at)fns.uniba.sk,
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2246
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Author Clewley, G.D.; Plummer, K.E.; Robinson, R.A.; Simm, C.H.; Toms, M.P.
Title The effect of artificial lighting on the arrival time of birds using garden feeding stations in winter: A missed opportunity? Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal Urban Ecosystems
Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages (down) 535–546
Keywords Animals; Artificial light; Citizen science; Foraging; Garden birds; Supplementary feeding; Urbanization
Abstract The proliferation of artificial lighting at night is one of the key anthropogenic changes associated with urbanised areas as well as some non-urban areas. Disruption to natural light/dark regimes can have considerable effects on the timing of different behaviours of birds, particularly during the breeding season. However, the effect of artificial lights on the timing of behaviours during winter has received relatively little attention, despite the fact that time partitioning of foraging can have implications for avian winter survival. In this study, we assess at a landscape scale during winter, whether birds arrive at feeding stations earlier in areas with increased levels of artificial lighting using data from a citizen science project. Arrival times of the ten most commonly recorded species were associated with a combination of the density of artificial lights, temperature, rainfall and urban land cover. We found no evidence that birds advance the onset of foraging in gardens with more artificial lights nearby; contrary to our prediction, birds generally arrived later into these areas. This is possibly a response to differences in food availability or predation risk in areas with more artificial lights. We conclude that artificial light at night may not be as important for driving the timing of foraging behaviour in winter as previously thought, but it remains to be seen whether this represents a missed opportunity to extend the foraging period or an adaptive response.
Address British Trust for Ornithology, The Nunnery, Thetford, Norfolk, IP24 2PU, UK; gary.clewley(at)bto.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1083-8155 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1316
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Author Lystrup, D.E.
Title The Dark Side of the Light: Rachel Carson, Light Pollution, and a Case for Federal Regulation Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Jurimetrics Abbreviated Journal Jurimetrics
Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages (down) 505-528
Keywords Society; law; light pollution; regulation; environmentalism
Abstract This comment explores the negative effects of light pollution and considers whether current levels of artificial light at night (LAN) warrant federal control by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This study first identifies the negative effects of light pollution on human health and the environment, treatment of which aligns with the mission statement of the EPA. Light pollution comprises both a private and a public nuisance. Next, this comment assesses the effectiveness of the common law approach, local government, state government, and federal control over light pollution in this context to determine which form of governance is most effective. Then, EPA involvement through federal and state implemented plans, as well as federal regulation of manufacturing is investigated. Last, this comment considers the necessity of private action through an emerging legal reform called new governance, which emphasizes public-private approaches. The negative effects of light pollution on human health and the environment could eventually lead the EPA to assert control over the regulation of light pollution, but under the current presidential administration this is highly unlikely. The predicted lack of government action leads me to call for nongovernment organizations (NGOs) to step in and take action to privately regulate light pollution and mitigate its negative effects through certification regimes, insurance premium incentives, and corporate social responsibility until government exerts regulatory control.
Address Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University, MC 9520 Arizona State University 111 E. Taylor Street Phoenix, AZ 85004-4467 USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Bar Association Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1995
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Author Prugh, L.R.; Golden, C.D.
Title Does moonlight increase predation risk? Meta-analysis reveals divergent responses of nocturnal mammals to lunar cycles Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol
Volume 83 Issue 2 Pages (down) 504-514
Keywords foraging efficiency; giving-up density; illumination; indirect effects; lunar cycles; moonlight; nocturnality; phylogenetic meta-analysis; predation risk; risk-sensitive foraging
Abstract The risk of predation strongly affects mammalian population dynamics and community interactions. Bright moonlight is widely believed to increase predation risk for nocturnal mammals by increasing the ability of predators to detect prey, but the potential for moonlight to increase detection of predators and the foraging efficiency of prey has largely been ignored. Studies have reported highly variable responses to moonlight among species, calling into question the assumption that moonlight increases risk. Here, we conducted a quantitative meta-analysis examining the effects of moonlight on the activity of 59 nocturnal mammal species to test the assumption that moonlight increases predation risk. We examined patterns of lunarphilia and lunarphobia across species in relation to factors such as trophic level, habitat cover preference and visual acuity. Across all species included in the meta-analysis, moonlight suppressed activity. The magnitude of suppression was similar to the presence of a predator in experimental studies of foraging rodents (13.6% and 18.7% suppression, respectively). Contrary to the expectation that moonlight increases predation risk for all prey species, however, moonlight effects were not clearly related to trophic level and were better explained by phylogenetic relatedness, visual acuity and habitat cover. Moonlight increased the activity of prey species that use vision as their primary sensory system and suppressed the activity of species that primarily use other senses (e.g. olfaction, echolocation), and suppression was strongest in open habitat types. Strong taxonomic patterns underlay these relationships: moonlight tended to increase primate activity, whereas it tended to suppress the activity of rodents, lagomorphs, bats and carnivores. These results indicate that visual acuity and habitat cover jointly moderate the effect of moonlight on predation risk, whereas trophic position has little effect. While the net effect of moonlight appears to increase predation risk for most nocturnal mammals, our results highlight the importance of sensory systems and phylogenetic history in determining the level of risk.
Address Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 311 Irving 1, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24102189 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 83
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