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Author Leskey, T.; Lee, D.-H.; Glenn, D.; Morrison, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Behavioral Responses of the Invasive Halyomorpha halys (StÃ¥l) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) to Light-Based Stimuli in the Laboratory and Field Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Insect Behavior Abbreviated Journal J. of Insect Behav.  
  Volume 28 Issue 6 Pages (down) 674-692  
  Keywords Animals; Brown marmorated stink bug; light trap; visual ecology; IPM; wavelength; Halyomorpha halys; invasive species  
  Abstract Halyomorpha halys (StÃ¥l), brown marmorated stink bug, is an invasive insect native to Asia that was accidentally introduced into the United States. The species is a polyphagous pest that has caused serious economic injury to specialty and row crops in the mid-Atlantic region. Growers have targeted H. halys with broad-spectrum materials by increasing the number of and decreasing the interval between insecticide applications. While it is known that adults reliably respond to semiochemical cues, much less is known about the response of H. halys to visual stimuli. Field observations suggest that H. halys adults respond to light-based stimuli, with large aggregations of adults documented at outdoor light sources and captured in commercial blacklight traps. Therefore, we conducted a series of studies aimed at identifying optimal wavelengths and intensities of light attractive to H. halys adults. We found that intensity and wavelength of light affected H. halys response in the laboratory and field. In the laboratory, H. halys demonstrated positive phototactic responses to full-spectrum and wavelength-restricted stimuli at a range of intensities, though the levels of stimulus acceptance and attraction, respectively, changed according to intensity. The species is most attracted to white, blue and black (ultraviolet) wavelength-restricted stimuli in the laboratory and field. In the field, traps baited with blue light sources were less attractive to non-target insect species, but white light sources were more attractive to H. halys indicating that these two light sources may be good candidates for inclusion in light-based monitoring traps.  
  Address USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 2217 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV, 25430-2771, USA; tracy.leskey(at)ars.usda.gov  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0892-7553 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1300  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shaw, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night as Fragmenting Frontier: Understanding the Night that Remains in an era of24/7: Night as Fragmenting Frontier Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Geography Compass Abbreviated Journal Geography Compass  
  Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages (down) 637-647  
  Keywords Society; geography; social science  
  Abstract Social scientists have previously understood the night through a frontier metaphor. This has pitched night as an empty or lightly inhabited space into which the urban, capitalist day has been expanding. The contemporary increase in nocturnal research has complicated this picture, showing an increasing multiplicity of complexly lived, structured and experienced nights across the globe. This paper looks to retrieve the concept of night as frontier by drawing on postcolonial theories to generate a more subtle conceptualisation of ‘frontier’, while also arguing that recent research reveals that this frontier is now fragmenting. By exploring research into a series of core themes – artificial light at night and darkness; night-lives; and global nights – I then explore what such an understanding of night allows us to say about current research. As nocturnal social science continues to mature, a more critical eye will need to be paid to the complexity of shifting power relations and identities within this fragmenting nocturnal frontier.  
  Address School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, Claremont Tower, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 7RU; robert.shaw2(at)ncl.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1749-8198 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1326  
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Author Andre, J.; Owens, D.A. url  openurl
  Title The Twilight Envelope: A User-Centered Approach to Describing Roadway Illumination at Night Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages (down) 620-630  
  Keywords Society  
  Abstract Visual recognition functions, such as acuity and contrast sensitivity, deteriorate rapidly over the declining luminances found during civil twilight. Thus civil twilight, a critical part of the transition between daylight and darkness, represents lighting conditions that may be useful to describe artificial illumination. Automotive headlamps project a three-dimensional beam that ranges from illumination levels comparable to daylight at the vehicle to the dark limit of civil twilight (3.3 1x) at some distance ahead. This twilight envelope is characterized as a distance beyond which foveal visual functions are severely impaired, and thus it provides a general, functional description of the useful extent of the headlamp beam. This user-centered approach to describing illumination is useful for characterizing visibility when driving at night or in other artificially lit environments. This paper discusses the twilight envelope approach and its application to intervehicle variations in headlamp systems. Actual or potential applications of this research include user-centered description of artificial illumination and driver/pedestrian safety education.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 988  
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Author Stone, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Value of Darkness: A Moral Framework for Urban Nighttime Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science and Engineering Ethics Abbreviated Journal Sci Eng Ethics  
  Volume 24 Issue 2 Pages (down) 607-628  
  Keywords Darkness; Society  
  Abstract The adverse effects of artificial nighttime lighting, known as light pollution, are emerging as an important environmental issue. To address these effects, current scientific research focuses mainly on identifying what is bad or undesirable about certain types and uses of lighting at night. This paper adopts a value-sensitive approach, focusing instead on what is good about darkness at night. In doing so, it offers a first comprehensive analysis of the environmental value of darkness at night from within applied ethics. A design for values orientation is utilized to conceptualize, define, and categorize the ways in which value is derived from darkness. Nine values are identified and categorized via their type of good, temporal outlook, and spatial characteristics. Furthermore, these nine values are translated into prima facie moral obligations that should be incorporated into future design choices, policy-making, and innovations to nighttime lighting. Thus, the value of darkness is analyzed with the practical goal of informing future decision-making about urban nighttime lighting.  
  Address Ethics and Philosophy of Technology Section, Delft University of Technology, Jaffalaan 5, 2628 BX, Delft, The Netherlands. t.w.stone@tudelft.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1353-3452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28597220; PMCID:PMC5876417 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2225  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Edensor, T.; Falconer, E. doi  openurl
  Title Dans Le Noir? Eating in the dark: sensation and conviviality in a lightless place Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cultural Geographies Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages (down) 601-618  
  Keywords Society; Darkness  
  Abstract Drawing on ethnographic interviews with customers, this paper looks at the experience of dining at Dans le Noir?, a restaurant in London where eating is carried out in complete darkness. As an exemplary gastro-tourist site within the expanding leisure economy at which sensory alterity is sought, we argue that the transformation of the usual unreflexive habits of sensing while dining offer opportunities to encounter difference and reflect upon our culturally located ways of sensing the world. In focusing upon the altered experience of apprehending space, eating and socialising in the absence of light, we contend that this dining experience offers broader suggestions about how we might reconsider the qualities and potentialities of darkness, a condition which has been historically feared and reviled in the west.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 740  
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