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Author Bazell, R.J. url  openurl
  Title Star Bright, Street Light, Which Will They See Tonight? Type Magazine Article
  Year 1971 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 171 Issue Pages (down) 461  
  Keywords Society; light pollution; history; historical  
  Abstract Astronomers are asking that Tucson modify its outdoor lighting so that their view of the heavens will not be obstructed by the city's nighttime glare. Workers at the five observatories: in the mountains surrounding this rapidly growing city of 300,000 fear that in the future they will be unable to observe certain astronomical phenomena, if the amount of light coming from the city continues to increase.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1257  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sperber, A.N.; Elmore, A.C.; Crow, M.L.; Cawlfield, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Performance evaluation of energy efficient lighting associated with renewable energy applications Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Renewable Energy Abbreviated Journal Renewable Energy  
  Volume 44 Issue Pages (down) 423-430  
  Keywords Renewable energy; Energy efficiency; Ultra capacitor; Light emitting diodes; Metal halide; LED; LED lighting  
  Abstract Energy efficiency is a primary consideration when designing off-grid renewable energy systems including portable micro-grids. This study focuses on characterizing the potential benefits associated with using energy efficient exterior area lighting commonly associated with remote installations. Light emitting diode (LED) luminaires are becoming more commercially available, and this study compares two LED products designed for exterior lighting to traditional metal halide lamps. The characterization focuses on the use of a diesel generator, battery bank, and a bank of ultra capacitors (UCAPs) to power the lights because these systems are also used to generate or store energy at renewable energy-powered micro-grids. This field-based study quantifies the illuminance provided by each lighting system, diesel consumption rates associated with powering the lights and/or charging the batteries and UCAPs, and the time of operation for each lighting system when powered by a single discharge cycle of the batteries and UCAPs. The energy efficiency benefit of the LED luminaires is offset by their lower illuminance. However, a comparison of lighting standards for specific purposes such as security lighting indicates that LEDs may be appropriate for applications where a metal halide system would provide significantly more illumination than required at a much higher energy cost. For those purposes where higher levels of illuminance are required, the data presented in the paper may be useful in designing a renewable energy-powered micro-grid that uses multiple LED fixtures to illuminate an exterior area that is currently illuminated by a single metal halide light stand.  
  Address Geological Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 129 McNutt Hall, 1400 N. Bishop Avenue Rolla, MO 65409, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-1481 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 335  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Edensor, T. doi  openurl
  Title The Gloomy City: Rethinking the Relationship between Light and Dark Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Urban Studies Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 52 Issue 3 Pages (down) 422-438  
  Keywords Society  
  Abstract Given geography’s neglect of illuminated and dark space, this paper explores the various qualities of darkness that have contributed to the experience of the city. In recent history, darkness has been conceptualised negatively, for instance, with the ‘dark side’ and the ‘forces of darkness’ conceived as the opposite of that which enlightens and illuminates. Perhaps such metaphors testify to earlier urban conditions in which perils of all sorts lurked in the nocturnal city and doors were closed when darkness fell. Yet modern illumination has transformed nocturnal urban experience, producing cityscapes of regulation, hierarchical selectiveness, consumption, fantasy and imagination. However, this article suggests that the more positive qualities of darkness have been overlooked: the potential for conviviality and intimacy to be fostered in the dark, the aesthetics and atmospherics of darkness and shadow, the possibilities for apprehending the world through other senses and the dismissal of the star-saturated sky.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 739  
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Author Labuda, M.; Koch, R.; Nagyová, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title “Dark Sky Parks” as measure to support nature tourism in large protection areas – case study in the Nature Park “Nossentiner/Schwinzer Heide” Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Naturschutz und Landschaftsplanung Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 47 Issue 12 Pages (down) 380-388  
  Keywords Society; dark sky parks; tourism; astrotourism; economic impact; economics; economic benefit; Germany  
  Abstract Some of the key characteristics of environmentally compatible. tourism are the minimisation of negative impacts on the environment and the preservation of the ecological capacity. “Dark Sky Parks” are one of the important measures to support nature tourism in large protection areas. Using the example of the Nature Park “Nossentiner/Schwinzer Heide” the paper introduces a concept of 'astrotourism': measurements of the brightness (magnitude) of the nocturnal sky, selection of suitable sites for astronomic observations, development of a lighting plan which mainly aims to define rules and guidelines for the outdoor lighting, and measures to protect the nocturnal sky and reduce the light pollution in the future Dark Sky Park. The region of the Nature Park Nossentiner/Schwinzer Heide is characterised by a minor light pollution, due to a low settlement density and its large, coherent forest areas. This fact contributes to the protection of nocturnal species and it can be used for the future tourism concept in the protection area. The presented concept to develop nature tourism shows a reaction on one of the fastest environmental changes: the decreasing intensity of natural darkness due to artificial light sources.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Eugen Ulmer KG Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0940-6808 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1341  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gardner, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The use and misuse of coloured light in the urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Optics & Laser Technology Abbreviated Journal Optics & Laser Technology  
  Volume 38 Issue 4-6 Pages (down) 366-376  
  Keywords Planning; Society; Psychology  
  Abstract The last few years have seen a huge increase in the transfer of coloured architectural lighting, derived from entertainment and theatre, into the urban and exterior environment. Part of the reason for this is that in the last 15 yr or so, there have been a number of important introductions in coloured lighting technology. These have transformed lighting practice, and while their widespread introduction is seen by some as an enrichment of the urban fabric, others see it as presenting considerable dangers, in terms of aesthetics, perception and in terms of civic identity. Its negative effects on the urban environment have been termed ‘colour blight’.

In this paper, the range of coloured lighting technologies is surveyed and other causes for the increase in coloured lighting are also discussed, together with the problems and benefits involved. Finally, some tentative means are put forward for resolving the problems caused by ‘colour blight’. Current good practice is illustrated by the author's own experience, including his consultancy's participation in a number of urban lighting strategies in the UK and elsewhere. This work involves implementation of a comprehensive lighting plan for the historic city of York, as part of the Urban Lighting Group consortium of three lighting design practices.
 
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0030-3992 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2183  
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