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Author Barentine, J.C.
Title Going for the Gold : Quantifying and Ranking Visual Night Sky Quality in International Dark Sky Places Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal IJSL
Volume 18 Issue Pages 9-15
Keywords Society; conservation; dark sky places; dark sky; National parks; dark sky parks; national parks; Luminescent Measurements; Night sky brightness
Abstract Since the invention of electric lighting in the nineteenth century, the steadily increasing use of artificial light at night in outdoor spaces has grown to threaten the integrity of dark night skies and nocturnal terrestrial spaces. The conservation community has gradually come to accept the need to protect natural nighttime darkness, which finds expression in dark sky parks and similar protected areas. As these places begin to reap tangible economic benefits in the form of sustainable ‘astrotourism,’ the movement to actively protect them gains strength. The International Dark-Sky Association designates Dark Sky Parks and Reserves under a comparative ranking scheme that assigns night sky quality tiers according to a combination of objective and subjective characteristics, but shortcomings in the consistency of these ratings exist that undermine the consistency and reputation of the designation program. Here we consider potential changes to the qualification regime to make the ratings system more robust for the benefit of future designations.
Address 3323 N 1st Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85719 USA; john(at)darksky.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2586-1247 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1779
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Author Pandharipande, A.; Ramasamy, S.; Anderson, J.
Title Social Impact of Connected Landmark Lighting: A Social Sensing Approach Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication IEEE Internet of Things Magazine Abbreviated Journal IEEE Internet Things M.
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 64-67
Keywords Lighting; Society
Abstract The benefits of using light emitting diode (LED) lighting for landmarks extend beyond energy savings to the use of illumination for creating visual identity, placemaking, and increasing tourism. While measuring energy consumption is possible with metering technologies, thereby quantifying savings in energy costs, quantification of the social impact of landmark lighting is not straightforward. Measuring and monitoring social impact metrics is key to stakeholders investing in new connected LED lighting systems or upgrades of conventional lighting in order to realize the benefits of lighting that are beyond energy sustainability. We consider social sensing as an approach to quantifying social impact of landmark lighting. Using lighting at the Empire State Building and Bay Bridge as case studies, social sensing querying and data analytics aspects are presented. A number of practical lessons and technical directions for the use of social sensing in connected landmark lighting are then laid out.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2576-3180 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2881
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Pritchard, S.B.; Ekirch, A.R.; Eldridge, A.; Jechow, A.; Preiser, C.; Kunz, D.; Henckel, D.; Hölker, F.; Barentine, J.; Berge, J.; Meier, J.; Gwiazdzinski, L.; Spitschan, M.; Milan, M.; Bach, S.; Schroer, S.; Straw, W.
Title Night Matters—Why the Interdisciplinary Field of “Night Studies” Is Needed Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication J — Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal Abbreviated Journal J
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 1-6
Keywords Commentary; night; night science; night studies; nyctology; interdisciplinary studies; scholarship
Abstract The night has historically been neglected in both disciplinary and interdisciplinary research. To some extent, this is not surprising, given the diurnal bias of human researchers and the difficulty of performing work at night. The night is, however, a critical element of biological, chemical, physical, and social systems on Earth. Moreover, research into social issues such as inequality, demographic changes, and the transition to a sustainable economy will be compromised if the night is not considered. Recent years, however, have seen a surge in research into the night. We argue that “night studies” is on the cusp of coming into its own as an interdisciplinary field, and that when it does, the field will consider questions that disciplinary researchers have not yet thought to ask.
Address GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam 14473, Germany; kyba(at)gfz-potsdam.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2571-8800 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2814
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Author Gandy, M.
Title Negative Luminescence Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Annals of the American Association of Geographers Abbreviated Journal Ann. Amer. Assn. Geographers
Volume Issue Pages 1-18
Keywords Society; geography; urbanism; history
Abstract The increasingly pervasive phenomenon of light pollution spans several different fields of concern, including the loss of the night sky, energy wastage, and the effects of artificial light on circadian rhythms and nocturnal ecology. Although the scale of the problem has grown significantly in recent decades, the underlying dynamics remain only partially understood beyond the identification of specific technological pathways such as the rise of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or the capitalist transformation of the nocturnal realm. It is suggested that current approaches to the study of light, including the identification of “urban atmospheres,” the elaboration of existing approaches to urban ecology, or the extension of “smart city” type discourses, do not capture the full complexity of the politics of light under late modernity.
Address Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Downing Place, Cambridge CB2 3EN, UK; mg107(at)cam.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2469-4452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1665
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Author Walch, O.J.; Cochran, A.; Forger, D.B.
Title A global quantification of “normal” sleep schedules using smartphone data Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Science Advances
Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages e1501705-e1501705
Keywords Human Health; Sleep; *Circadian Rhythm; smartphone; society
Abstract The influence of the circadian clock on sleep scheduling has been studied extensively in the laboratory; however, the effects of society on sleep remain largely unquantified. We show how a smartphone app that we have developed, ENTRAIN, accurately collects data on sleep habits around the world. Through mathematical modeling and statistics, we find that social pressures weaken and/or conceal biological drives in the evening, leading individuals to delay their bedtime and shorten their sleep. A country’s average bedtime, but not average wake time, predicts sleep duration. We further show that mathematical models based on controlled laboratory experiments predict qualitative trends in sunrise, sunset, and light level; however, these effects are attenuated in the real world around bedtime. Additionally, we find that women schedule more sleep than men and that users reporting that they are typically exposed to outdoor light go to sleep earlier and sleep more than those reporting indoor light. Finally, we find that age is the primary determinant of sleep timing, and that age plays an important role in the variability of population-level sleep habits. This work better defines and personalizes “normal” sleep, produces hypotheses for future testing in the laboratory, and suggests important ways to counteract the global sleep crisis.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2375-2548 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1440
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