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Author Haraguchi, S.; Kamata, M.; Tokita, T.; Tashiro, K.-I.; Sato, M.; Nozaki, M.; Okamoto-Katsuyama, M.; Shimizu, I.; Han, G.; Chowdhury, V.S.; Lei, X.-F.; Miyazaki, T.; Kim-Kaneyama, J.-R.; Nakamachi, T.; Matsuda, K.; Ohtaki, H.; Tokumoto, T.; Tachibana, T.; Miyazaki, A.; Tsutsui, K.
Title Light-at-night exposure affects brain development through pineal allopregnanolone-dependent mechanisms Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication ELife Abbreviated Journal Elife
Volume 8 Issue Pages e45306
Keywords Animals; chicken; neuroscience; Circadian disruption; pineal allopregnanolone; cell death
Abstract The molecular mechanisms by which environmental light conditions affect cerebellar development are incompletely understood. We showed that circadian disruption by light-at-night induced Purkinje cell death through pineal allopregnanolone (ALLO) activity during early life in chicks. Light-at-night caused the loss of diurnal variation of pineal ALLO synthesis during early life and led to cerebellar Purkinje cell death, which was suppressed by a daily injection of ALLO. The loss of diurnal variation of pineal ALLO synthesis induced not only reduction in pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), a neuroprotective hormone, but also transcriptional repression of the cerebellar Adcyap1 gene that produces PACAP, with subsequent Purkinje cell death. Taken together, pineal ALLO mediated the effect of light on early cerebellar development in chicks.
Address Department of Biology, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan; shogo.haraguchi(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher eLife Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2050-084X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31566568 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2694
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Author Leung, S.T.; McKinney, R.A.; Watt, A.J.
Title The impact of light during the night Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication eLife Abbreviated Journal eLife
Volume 8 Issue Pages in press
Keywords Commentary; *brain development; *chicken; *light-at-night; *neuroscience; *pineal gland; *steroid
Abstract Exposing chicks to one hour of light during the night disrupts the release of a hormone that is needed by cells in the developing brain to survive.
Address Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2050-084X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31714876; PMCID:PMC6850772 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2795
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Author Adams, C.A.; Blumenthal, A.; Fernández-Juricic, E.; Bayne, E.; St. Clair, C.C.
Title Effect of anthropogenic light on bird movement, habitat selection, and distribution: a systematic map protocol Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Evidence Abbreviated Journal Environ Evid
Volume 8 Issue S1 Pages 13
Keywords Animals; BirdsDepartment of Biological Science, University of Alberta, CW 405, Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada
Abstract Anthropogenic light is known or suspected to exert profound effects on many taxa, including birds. Documentation of bird aggregation around artificial light at night, as well as observations of bird reactions to strobe lights and lasers, suggests that light may both attract and repel birds, although this assumption has yet to be tested. These effects may cause immediate changes to bird movement, habitat selection and settlement, and ultimately alter bird distribution at large spatial scales. Global increases in the extent of anthropogenic light contribute to interest by wildlife managers and the public in managing light to reduce harm to birds, but there are no evidence syntheses of the multiple ways light affects birds to guide this effort. Existing reviews usually emphasize either bird aggregation or deterrence and do so for a specific context, such as aggregation at communication towers and deterrence from airports. We outline a protocol for a systematic map that collects and organizes evidence from the many contexts in which anthropogenic light is reported to affect bird movement, habitat selection, or distribution. Our map will provide an objective synthesis of the evidence that identifies subtopics that may support systematic review and knowledge gaps that could direct future research questions. These products will substantially advance an understanding of both patterns and processes associated with the responses of birds to anthropogenic light.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2047-2382 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2547
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Author Spitschan, M.; Aguirre, G.K.; Brainard, D.H.; Sweeney, A.M.
Title Variation of outdoor illumination as a function of solar elevation and light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 26756
Keywords Skyglow; Measurements; light pollution; daylight; twilight; sky brightness; spectral irradiance; CIE
Abstract The illumination of the environment undergoes both intensity and spectral changes during the 24 h cycle of a day. Daylight spectral power distributions are well described by low-dimensional models such as the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) daylight model, but the performance of this model in non-daylight regimes is not characterised. We measured downwelling spectral irradiance across multiple days in two locations in North America: One rural location (Cherry Springs State Park, PA) with minimal anthropogenic light sources, and one city location (Philadelphia, PA). We characterise the spectral, intensity and colour changes and extend the existing CIE model for daylight to capture twilight components and the spectrum of the night sky.
Address Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27272736 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1464
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Author Schirmer, A.E.; Gallemore, C.; Liu, T.; Magle, S.; DiNello, E.; Ahmed, H.; Gilday, T.
Title Mapping behaviorally relevant light pollution levels to improve urban habitat planning Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 1-13
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing; Society; remote sensing; cities; Urban planning; urban wildlife; urban ecology
Abstract Artificial nighttime lights have important behavioral and ecological effects on wildlife. Combining laboratory and field techniques, we identified behaviorally relevant levels of nighttime light and mapped the extent of these light levels across the city of Chicago. We began by applying a Gaussian finite mixture model to 998 sampled illumination levels around Chicago to identify clusters of light levels. A simplified sample of these levels was replicated in the laboratory to identify light levels at which C57BL/6J mice exhibited altered circadian activity patterns. We then used camera trap and high-altitude photographic data to compare our field and laboratory observations, finding activity pattern changes in the field consistent with laboratory observations. Using these results, we mapped areas across Chicago exposed to estimated illumination levels above the value associated with statistically significant behavioral changes. Based on this measure, we found that as much as 36% of the greenspace in the city is in areas illuminated at levels greater than or equal to those at which we observe behavioral differences in the field and in the laboratory. Our findings provide evidence that artificial lighting patterns may influence wildlife behavior at a broad scale throughout urban areas, and should be considered in urban habitat planning.
Address Northeastern Illinois University, Dept. of Biology, 5500 St. Louis Ave., Chicago, IL, 60625, USA; a-schirmer(at) neiu.edu)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2615
Permanent link to this record