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Author Smolensky, M.H.; Sackett-Lundeen, L.L.; Portaluppi, F.
Title Nocturnal light pollution and underexposure to daytime sunlight: Complementary mechanisms of circadian disruption and related diseases Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume Issue (up) Pages 1-20
Keywords Human Health; Artificial light at night; cancer; circadian time structure; development and disruption; melatonin; sleep/wake cycle disturbance; sunlight; vitamin D; vitamin D deficiency; circadian time structure; circadian rhythm; desynchrony
Abstract Routine exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) in work, home, and community settings is linked with increased risk of breast and prostate cancer (BC, PC) in normally sighted women and men, the hypothesized biological rhythm mechanisms being frequent nocturnal melatonin synthesis suppression, circadian time structure (CTS) desynchronization, and sleep/wake cycle disruption with sleep deprivation. ALAN-induced perturbation of the CTS melatonin synchronizer signal is communicated maternally at the very onset of life and after birth via breast or artificial formula feedings. Nighttime use of personal computers, mobile phones, electronic tablets, televisions, and the like – now epidemic in adolescents and adults and highly prevalent in pre-school and school-aged children – is a new source of ALAN. However, ALAN exposure occurs concomitantly with almost complete absence of daytime sunlight, whose blue-violet (446-484 nm lambda) spectrum synchronizes the CTS and whose UV-B (290-315 nm lambda) spectrum stimulates vitamin D synthesis. Under natural conditions and clear skies, day/night and annual cycles of UV-B irradiation drive corresponding periodicities in vitamin D synthesis and numerous bioprocesses regulated by active metabolites augment and strengthen the biological time structure. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are widespread in children and adults in developed and developing countries as a consequence of inadequate sunlight exposure. Past epidemiologic studies have focused either on exposure to too little daytime UV-B or too much ALAN, respectively, on vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency or melatonin suppression in relation to risk of cancer and other, e.g., psychiatric, hypertensive, cardiac, and vascular, so-called, diseases of civilization. The observed elevated incidence of medical conditions the two are alleged to influence through many complementary bioprocesses of cells, tissues, and organs led us to examine effects of the totality of the artificial light environment in which humans reside today. Never have chronobiologic or epidemiologic investigations comprehensively researched the potentially deleterious consequences of the combination of suppressed vitamin D plus melatonin synthesis due to life in today's man-made artificial light environment, which in our opinion is long overdue.
Address c Hypertension Center, S. Anna University Hospital, University of Ferrara , Ferrara , Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26374931 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1271
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Author Mège, P.; Ödeen, A.; Théry, M.; Picard, D.; Secondi, J.
Title Partial Opsin Sequences Suggest UV-Sensitive Vision is Widespread in Caudata Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Evolutionary Biology Abbreviated Journal Evol. Biol.
Volume Issue (up) Pages 1-10
Keywords Animals; Caudata; amphibians; ultraviolet; ultraviolet vision; opsin; photobiology; SWS1; Paralog gene; Tuning site; Nocturnal species; Sliding window; Ka/Ks
Abstract Ultraviolet (UV) vision exists in several animal groups. Intuitively, one would expect this trait to be favoured in species living in bright environments, where UV light is the most present. However, UV sensitivity, as deduced from sequences of UV photoreceptors and/or ocular media transmittance, is also present in nocturnal species, raising questions about the selective pressure maintaining this perceptual ability. Amphibians are among the most nocturnal vertebrates but their visual ecology remains poorly understood relative to other groups. Perhaps because many of these species breed in environments that filter out a large part of UV radiation, physiological and behavioural studies of UV sensitivity in this group are scarce. We investigated the extent of UV vision in Caudata, the order of amphibians with the most nocturnal habits. We could recover sequences of the UV sensitive SWS1 opsin in 40 out of 58 species, belonging to 6 families. In all of these species, the evidence suggests the presence of functional SWS1 opsins under purifying selection, potentially allowing UV vision. Interestingly, most species whose opsin genes failed to amplify exhibited particular ecological features that could drive the loss of UV vision. This likely wide distribution of functional UV photoreceptors in Caudata sheds a new light on the visual ecology of amphibians and questions the function of UV vision in nocturnal animal species.
Address GECCO, Université d’Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045, Angers, France; pascal.mege(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0071-3260 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1299
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Author Bach, S.; usanne; Degenring, F. (eds)
Title Dark Nights, Bright Lights: Night, Darkness, and Illumination in Literature Type Book Whole
Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue (up) Pages
Keywords Society; literature; art
Abstract Light and darkness shape our perception of the world. This is true in a literal sense, but also metaphorically: in theology, philosophy, literature and the arts the light of day signifies life, safety, knowledge and all that is good, while the darkness of the night suggests death, danger, ignorance and evil.

A closer inspection, however, reveals that things are not quite so clear cut and that light and darkness cannot be understood as simple binary opposites. On a biological level, for example, daylight and darkness are inseparable factors in the calibration of our circadian rhythms, and a lack of periodical darkness appears to be as contrary to health as a lack of exposure to sunlight. On a cultural level, too, night and darkness are far from being universally condemnable: in fiction, drama and poetry the darkness of the night allows not only nightmares but also dreams, it allows criminals to ply their trade and allows lovers to meet, it allows the pursuit of pleasure as well as deep thought, it allows metamorphoses, transformations and transgressions unthinkable in the light of day. But night is not merely darkness. The night gains significance as an alternative space, as an ‘other of the day’, only when it is at least partially illuminated.

The volume examines the interconnection of night, darkness and nocturnal illumination across a broad range of literary texts. The individual essays examine historically specific light conditions in literature, tracing the symbolic and metaphoric content of darkness and illumination and the attitudes towards them.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher De Gruyter Place of Publication Editor Bach, S.; usanne; Degenring, F.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Anglia Book Series Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume 50 Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-3-11-041529-2 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1308
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Author Ceola, S.; Montanari, A.; Parajka, J.; Viglione, A.; Blöschl, G.; Laio, F.
Title Human signatures derived from nighttime lights along the Eastern Alpine river network in Austria and Italy Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue (up) Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; Society; nightlights; human presence; river network; Strahler order; DMSP-OLS; OLS; DMSP-OLS; Austria; Italy; Eastern Alpine
Abstract Understanding how human settlements and economic activities are distributed with reference to the geographical location of streams and rivers is of fundamental relevance for several issues, such as flood risk management, drought management related to increased water demands by human population, fluvial ecosystem services, water pollution and water exploitation. Besides the spatial distribution, the evolution in time of the human presence constitutes an additional key question. This work aims at understanding and analysing the spatial and temporal evolution of human settlements and associated economic activity, derived from nighttime lights, in the Eastern Alpine region. Nightlights, available at a fine spatial resolution and for a 22-year period, constitute an

excellent data base, which allows one to explore in details human signatures. In this experiment, nightlights are associated to five distinct distance-from-river classes. Our results clearly point out an overall enhancement of human presence across the considered distance classes during the last 22 years, though presenting some differences among the study regions. In particular, the river network delineation, by considering different groups of river pixels based on the Strahler order, is found to play a central role in the identification of nightlight spatio-temporal trends.
Address Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher International Association of Hydrological Sciences Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference 7th International Water Resources Management Conference of ICWRS, 18–20 May 2016, Bochum, Germany
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1432
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Author Grove, L.
Title Reducing Acadia's Light Pollution Type Manuscript
Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue (up) Pages
Keywords Conservation; Society; Economics; Acadia National Park; Maine; benefit cost analysis; astrotourism; contingent valuation method; dark sky places; dark sky park
Abstract Acadia National Park is among the most visited national parks in the United States, attracting millions of people per year. Thousands of those visitors come to the park for “astro-tourism,” as Acadia has become one of the premier stargazing locations on the east coast. There remains, however, the continued threat from light pollution from the surrounding communities that negatively affects Acadia's darkness, contributing to a lesser visitor experience and potentially harming native ecosystems. Although park management and community organizations have engaged in significant efforts to decrease Acadia's nighttime light levels and raise awareness among visitors and locals regarding the importance of darkness, the park still seek to continue to decrease light pollution. This report developed policy options that could help solve the long-term policy goal of decreasing nighttime lighting levels within and around Acadia while also using the International Dark-Sky Association's Dark-Sky Park designation requirements as a reasonable, short-term policy benchmark.

Working within existing organizations, the policy options crafted to address Acadia’s nighttime lighting levels were analyzed both qualitatively through a criteria evaluation and quantitatively through a Benefit Cost Analysis.

The options included 1) the formation of a Darkness Coalition within the League of Towns, 2) a reimagining of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute Dark-Sky Project into the Dark-Sky Taskforce, 3) the creation of a Lighting Consultant position paid through the Friends of Acadia Wild Acadia initiative, and 4) the combination of Coalition and the Taskforce into the League of Towns – Dark-Sky Partnership (LOT-DSP). The report recommends the adoption of Option 4 – the creation of the LOT – DSP. While this option does not provide the greatest estimated monetary net value compared to the Status Quo in the quantitative evaluation, it still provides an estimated benefit of about $105 million over the course of five years and is the strongest option in the qualitative analysis. The LOT – DSP provides the best opportunity for Acadia to achieve legitimate and long-lasting nighttime light level reduction.
Address Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, Garrett Hall, 235 McCormick Road, P.O. Box 400893, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4893 USA; locher.grove(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis
Publisher University of Virginia Place of Publication Charlottesville Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1449
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