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Author Leung, S.T.; McKinney, R.A.; Watt, A.J.
Title The impact of light during the night Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication eLife Abbreviated Journal eLife
Volume 8 Issue Pages in press
Keywords (up) Commentary; *brain development; *chicken; *light-at-night; *neuroscience; *pineal gland; *steroid
Abstract Exposing chicks to one hour of light during the night disrupts the release of a hormone that is needed by cells in the developing brain to survive.
Address Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2050-084X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31714876; PMCID:PMC6850772 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2795
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Author Vozzi, C.; Ramponi, R.
Title 2015 International Year of Light and beyond Type Magazine Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Optics Abbreviated Journal J. Opt.
Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 010201
Keywords (up) Commentary; International Year of Light; IYL; IYL2015; society
Abstract The 2015 International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL) is now approaching its end. It has been a year full of excitement worldwide, involving people of all ages in an incredible number of different activities
Address Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN-CNR) Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan, Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2040-8978 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1428
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Pritchard, S.B.; Ekirch, A.R.; Eldridge, A.; Jechow, A.; Preiser, C.; Kunz, D.; Henckel, D.; Hölker, F.; Barentine, J.; Berge, J.; Meier, J.; Gwiazdzinski, L.; Spitschan, M.; Milan, M.; Bach, S.; Schroer, S.; Straw, W.
Title Night Matters—Why the Interdisciplinary Field of “Night Studies” Is Needed Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication J — Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal Abbreviated Journal J
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 1-6
Keywords (up) Commentary; night; night science; night studies; nyctology; interdisciplinary studies; scholarship
Abstract The night has historically been neglected in both disciplinary and interdisciplinary research. To some extent, this is not surprising, given the diurnal bias of human researchers and the difficulty of performing work at night. The night is, however, a critical element of biological, chemical, physical, and social systems on Earth. Moreover, research into social issues such as inequality, demographic changes, and the transition to a sustainable economy will be compromised if the night is not considered. Recent years, however, have seen a surge in research into the night. We argue that “night studies” is on the cusp of coming into its own as an interdisciplinary field, and that when it does, the field will consider questions that disciplinary researchers have not yet thought to ask.
Address GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam 14473, Germany; kyba(at)gfz-potsdam.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2571-8800 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2814
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Author Schroer, S.; Huggins, B.J.; Azam, C.; Hölker, F.
Title Working with Inadequate Tools: Legislative Shortcomings in Protection against Ecological Effects of Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages 2551
Keywords (up) Conservation; Animals; Society; Law
Abstract The fundamental change in nocturnal landscapes due to the increasing use of artificial light at night (ALAN) is recognized as being detrimental to the environment and raises important regulatory questions as to whether and how it should be regulated based on the manifold risks to the environment. Here, we present the results of an analysis of the current legal obligations on ALAN in context with a systematic review of adverse effects. The legal analysis includes the relevant aspects of European and German environmental law, specifically nature conservation and immission control. The review represents the results of 303 studies indicating significant disturbances of organisms and landscapes. We discuss the conditions for prohibitions by environmental laws and whether protection gaps persist and, hence, whether specific legislation for light pollution is necessary. While protection is predominantly provided for species with special protection status that reveal avoidance behavior of artificially lit landscapes and associated habitat loss, adverse effects on species and landscapes without special protection status are often unaddressed by existing regulations. Legislative shortcomings are caused by difficulties in proving adverse effect on the population level, detecting lighting malpractice, and applying the law to ALAN-related situations. Measures to reduce ALAN-induced environmental impacts are highlighted. We discuss whether an obligation to implement such measures is favorable for environmental protection and how regulations can be implemented.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2868
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Author Grove, L.
Title Reducing Acadia's Light Pollution Type Manuscript
Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Conservation; Society; Economics; Acadia National Park; Maine; benefit cost analysis; astrotourism; contingent valuation method; dark sky places; dark sky park
Abstract Acadia National Park is among the most visited national parks in the United States, attracting millions of people per year. Thousands of those visitors come to the park for “astro-tourism,” as Acadia has become one of the premier stargazing locations on the east coast. There remains, however, the continued threat from light pollution from the surrounding communities that negatively affects Acadia's darkness, contributing to a lesser visitor experience and potentially harming native ecosystems. Although park management and community organizations have engaged in significant efforts to decrease Acadia's nighttime light levels and raise awareness among visitors and locals regarding the importance of darkness, the park still seek to continue to decrease light pollution. This report developed policy options that could help solve the long-term policy goal of decreasing nighttime lighting levels within and around Acadia while also using the International Dark-Sky Association's Dark-Sky Park designation requirements as a reasonable, short-term policy benchmark.

Working within existing organizations, the policy options crafted to address Acadia’s nighttime lighting levels were analyzed both qualitatively through a criteria evaluation and quantitatively through a Benefit Cost Analysis.

The options included 1) the formation of a Darkness Coalition within the League of Towns, 2) a reimagining of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute Dark-Sky Project into the Dark-Sky Taskforce, 3) the creation of a Lighting Consultant position paid through the Friends of Acadia Wild Acadia initiative, and 4) the combination of Coalition and the Taskforce into the League of Towns – Dark-Sky Partnership (LOT-DSP). The report recommends the adoption of Option 4 – the creation of the LOT – DSP. While this option does not provide the greatest estimated monetary net value compared to the Status Quo in the quantitative evaluation, it still provides an estimated benefit of about $105 million over the course of five years and is the strongest option in the qualitative analysis. The LOT – DSP provides the best opportunity for Acadia to achieve legitimate and long-lasting nighttime light level reduction.
Address Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, Garrett Hall, 235 McCormick Road, P.O. Box 400893, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4893 USA; locher.grove(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis
Publisher University of Virginia Place of Publication Charlottesville Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1449
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