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Author Manning, R.; Rovelstad, E.; Moore, C.; Hallo, J.; Smith, B.
Title Indicators and standards of quality for viewing the night sky in the national parks Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication ParkScience Abbreviated Journal ParkScience
Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Society; National parks; resource management; National Park Service; Acadia National Park
Abstract Night skies are increasingly recognized as an important park resource that demands more management attention. Management of night skies can be guided by a management-by-objectives framework that requires formulation of indicators and standards of quality. Two surveys were conducted at Acadia National Park to identify indicators and standards for stargazing. The first survey used an importance –performance approach and documented light pollution as an important indicator variable. The second survey used a normative approach and visual simulations to identify a range of standards of quality for light pollution. This program of research was designed to help inform management of night skies at Acadia and other parks.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher National Park Service Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1090-9966 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1285
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Author Berthaume, T.S.
Title Light Pollution: A Case for Federal Regulation? Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Graduate Thesis. Rochester, New York: Rochester Institute of Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Society; law; policy; public policy; light pollution; regulation; United States; regulation
Abstract The purpose of this thesis is to examine the body of evidence concerning light pollution and exposure to artificial light and determine if the scientific research warrants regulatory oversight in the United States. The first question that guided this effort was: Does improper artificial lighting and exposure to light-at-night constitute a risk to human health and safety? The follow up question being: Is light pollution a concern to ecological systems, and if so to what extent? A comprehensive literature review was conducted to ascertain the status of the research—if any—in these two areas and what the findings were. The overarching purpose of this thesis was to answer the primary question: Does the scientific research on light pollution and exposure to light-at-night exposure make a case for regulatory oversight, within the mandate of the EPA? The questions were illuminated by conducting a thorough literature review, doing an informal email survey, and by in-depth interviews with people researching artificial light and with individuals in the EPA. The study concluded that there is no ready consensus to be reached in this area. Such a disparate topic as light pollution does not readily lend itself to an easy answer. However, the findings show that light pollution and light-at-night exposure do have some negative impact. This is especially true in regards to the night sky and the biota. Whether the EPA should be involved in regulating it is not entirely clear. Their mission statement leads one to presume that certain effects of light pollution do fall under their mandate. More research to quantify the effects of artificial light on humans is critically needed to show causation between artificial light exposure and health problems.
Address Society; law; policy; public policy; light pollution; regulation; United States
Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis
Publisher Rochester Institute of Technology Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 995
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Author Hasenöhrl, U; Krause, K.; Meier, J.; Pottharst, M.
Title Urban Lighting, Light Pollution and Society Type Book Whole
Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Society; light pollution; urban; cities; city planning; urban development
Abstract After decades “in the shadows”, urban lighting is re-emerging as a matter of public debate. Long-standing truths are increasingly questioned as a confluence of developments affects lighting itself and the way it is viewed. Light has become an integral element of place-making and energy-saving initiatives alike. Rapidly evolving lighting technologies are opening up new possibilities, but also posing new challenges to planners, and awareness is growing that artificial illumination is not purely benign but can actually constitute a form of pollution. As a result, public policy frameworks, incentives and initiatives are undergoing a phase of innovation and change that will affect how cities are lit for years to come.

The first comprehensive compilation of current scientific discussions on urban lighting and light pollution from a social science and humanities perspective, Urban Lighting, Light Pollution and Society contributes to an evolving international debate on an increasingly controversial topic. The contributions draw a rich panorama of the manifold discourses connected with artificial illumination in the past and present – from early attempts to promote new lighting technologies in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to current debates on restricting its excessive usage in public space and the protection of darkness. By bringing together a cross-section of current findings and debates on urban lighting and light pollution from a wide variety of disciplines, it reflects that artificial lighting is multifaceted in its qualities, utilisation and interpretation.

Including case studies from the United States, Europe, and the UK, Urban Lighting, Light Pollution and Society is one of the first to take a serious assessment of light, pollution, and places and is a valuable resource for planners, policy makers and students in related subjects.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Routledge Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 9781138813960 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1046
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Author Spoelstra, K.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Donners, M.; Gienapp, P.; Huigens, M.E.; Slaterus, R.; Berendse, F.; Visser, M.E.; Veenendaal, E.
Title Experimental illumination of natural habitat—an experimental set-up to assess the direct and indirect ecological consequences of artificial light of different spectral composition Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 370 Issue Pages 20140129
Keywords Lighting; experimental lighting; population dynamics; daily timing; seasonal timing; cascading effects; citizen science; Pipistrellus pipistrellus; bats; pipistrelle bat; wood mouse; birds
Abstract Artificial night-time illumination of natural habitats has increased dramatically over the past few decades. Generally, studies that assess the impact of artificial light on various species in the wild make use of existing illumination and are therefore correlative. Moreover, studies mostly focus on short-term consequences at the individual level, rather than long-term consequences at the population and community level—thereby ignoring possible unknown cascading effects in ecosystems. The recent change to LED lighting has opened up the exciting possibility to use light with a custom spectral composition, thereby potentially reducing the negative impact of artificial light. We describe here a large-scale, ecosystem-wide study where we experimentally illuminate forest-edge habitat with different spectral composition, replicated eight times. Monitoring of species is being performed according to rigid protocols, in part using a citizen-science-based approach, and automated where possible. Simultaneously, we specifically look at alterations in behaviour, such as changes in activity, and daily and seasonal timing. In our set-up, we have so far observed that experimental lights facilitate foraging activity of pipistrelle bats, suppress activity of wood mice and have effects on birds at the community level, which vary with spectral composition. Thus far, we have not observed effects on moth populations, but these and many other effects may surface only after a longer period of time.
Address 1 Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), PO Box 50, 6700 AB Wageningen, The Netherlands; k.spoelstra@nioo.knaw.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1126
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Author Bará, S.
Title Light pollution: Why should we care? Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Second International Conference on Applications of Optics and Photonics Manuel Filipe P. C. Martins Costa; Rogério Nunes Nogueira Aveiro, Portugal, 2014 Abbreviated Journal Proc. SPIE 9286
Volume 9286 Issue Pages
Keywords Society; light pollution
Abstract The historical development of lighting technologies has been characterized by what evolution theorists call 'punctuated equilibrium': a succession of long periods of stable development followed by short periods of rapid change when key technological breakthroughs give rise to new lighting paradigms. Nowadays with the massive deployment of LED-based solid state lighting systems the illumination field is undergoing one of such accelerated transformation events. In parallel, a growing body of research has unveiled some of the complex interactions between the daily cycles of light and darkness and the regulating mechanisms of individuals, populations and ecosystems, including humans. This communication addresses some of the challenges that this new situation poses for the development of sustainable lighting systems.
Address Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Spain; salva.bara@usc.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1133
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