|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Sloane, M.; Slater, D.; Entwistle, J.
Title Tackling Social Inequalities in Public Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Society
Abstract 2This report is based on research findings of the Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme (CL) based at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), as well as on discussions of the Configuring Light expert working group. Consisting of high-profile experts and stakeholders in the fields of design, planning and policy-making, this group was established by CL to develop a new agenda for tackling social inequalities in public lighting. Members of the working group are listed at the end of this document.This project was run by the LSE-based Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme and funded by LSE Knowledge Exchange and Impact funding.
Address
Corporate Author London School of Economics Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2528
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hough, W.
Title The development of illumination Type Journal Article
Year 1901 Publication (up) American Anthropologist Abbreviated Journal
Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 342-352
Keywords History; Society; Lighting
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2416
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Finch, D.; Smith, B.R.; Marshall, C.; Coomber, F.G.; Kubasiewicz, L.M.; Anderson, M.; Wright, P.G.R.; Mathews, F.
Title Effects of Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) on European Hedgehog Activity at Supplementary Feeding Stations Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)
Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Erinaceus europaeus; activity pattern; camera trap; citizen science; fragmentation; hedgehogs; light pollution; lightscape; urbanisation
Abstract : Artificial light at night (ALAN) can have negative consequences for a wide range of taxa. However, the effects on nocturnal mammals other than bats are poorly understood. A citizen science camera trapping experiment was therefore used to assess the effect of ALAN on the activity of European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) at supplementary feeding stations in UK gardens. A crossover design was implemented at 33 gardens with two treatments-artificial light and darkness-each of which lasted for one week. The order of treatment depended on the existing lighting regime at the feeding station: dark treatments were applied first at dark feeding stations, whereas light treatments were used first where the station was already illuminated. Although temporal changes in activity patterns in response to the treatments were noted in some individuals, the direction of the effects was not consistent. Similarly, there was no overall impact of ALAN on the presence or feeding activities of hedgehogs in gardens where supplementary feeding stations were present. These findings are somewhat reassuring insofar as they demonstrate no net negative effect on a species thought to be in decline, in scenarios where the animals are already habituated to supplementary feeding. However, further research is needed to examine long-term effects and the effects of lighting on hedgehog prey, reproductive success and predation risk.
Address Mammal Society, London E9 6EJ, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32354129 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2904
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bouman, M.J.
Title City Lights and City Life: a Study of Technology and Urbanity Type Journal Article
Year 1985 Publication (up) Ann Arbor: University Microfilms International Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Society
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1004
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.-X.; Korkmaz, A.; Ma, S.
Title Obesity and metabolic syndrome: association with chronodisruption, sleep deprivation, and melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med
Volume 44 Issue 6 Pages 564-577
Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Animals; Child; Chronobiology Disorders/*epidemiology; Comorbidity; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Light/adverse effects; Melatonin/*deficiency/physiology; Metabolic Syndrome X/*epidemiology; Mice; Obesity/*epidemiology; Rats; Sleep Deprivation/*epidemiology
Abstract Obesity has become an epidemic in industrialized and developing countries. In 30 years, unless serious changes are made, a majority of adults and many children will be classified as overweight or obese. Whereas fatness alone endangers physiological performance of even simple tasks, the associated co-morbidity of obesity including metabolic syndrome in all its manifestations is a far more critical problem. If the current trend continues as predicted, health care systems may be incapable of handling the myriad of obesity-related diseases. The financial costs, including those due to medical procedures, absenteeism from work, and reduced economic productivity, will jeopardize the financial well-being of industries. The current review summarizes the potential contributions of three processes that may be contributing to humans becoming progressively more overweight: circadian or chronodisruption, sleep deficiency, and melatonin suppression. Based on the information provided in this survey, life-style factors (independent of the availability of abundant calorie-rich foods) may aggravate weight gain. Both epidemiological and experimental data support associations between disrupted physiological rhythms, a reduction in adequate sleep, and light-at-night-induced suppression of an essential endogenously produced molecule, melatonin. The implication is that if these problems were corrected with life-style changes, body-weight could possibly be more easily controlled.
Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UT Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA. reiter@uthscsa.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21668294 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 523
Permanent link to this record