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Author Boyce, P.R.
Title The benefits of light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment
Volume 151 Issue Pages 356-367
Keywords Lighting; Society; Conservation
Abstract The use of light at night continues to increase. Simply put, this is because without light we are deprived of our premier sense, vision. By enabling vision the use of light at night delivers a number of benefits to people. Such benefits include greater safety for pedestrians and drivers, reduced fear of crime, more use of outdoor facilities after dark, enhanced economic growth and the creation of built and natural environments that are a source of beauty and entertainment. This suggests that the use of light at night is linked to some very basic human motivations which in turn means that people value such benefits and will not willingly abandon them. Fortunately, careful lighting design, soundly-based outdoor lighting standards and new lighting and sensor technology offer the possibility of providing the benefits of light at night while minimizing the impact on the environment.
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ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2171
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Author Carhart, D.
Title Improve Outdoor Lighting Practices Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication (up) Buildings Abbreviated Journal
Volume 103 Issue 12 Pages 28
Keywords Society
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1013
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Author Hammerschlag, N.; Meyer, C.G.; Grace, M.S.; Kessel, S.T.; Sutton, T.T.; Harvey, E.S.; Paris-Limouzy, C.B.; Kerstetter, D.W.; Cooke, S.J.
Title Shining a light on fish at night: an overview of fish and fisheries in the dark of night, and in deep and polar seas Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) Bulletin of Marine Science Abbreviated Journal bms
Volume 93 Issue 2 Pages 253-284
Keywords Animals; Economics; Society
Abstract In aquatic environments, what one observes during the day can differ substantially by night. The species composition and associated ecological processes that occur during the day are often different than night. In polar seas and at great depths, “night” can span, months, years, and beyond. Teleosts and elasmobranchs have evolved unique sensory and behavioral modalities for living in darkness. As a consequence, fishers have adopted unique strategies for exploiting fish at night or in dark systems. We propose that neglecting the night has led to an incomplete understanding of aquatic organismal ecology, population/community dynamics, and ecosystem function with consequences for fisheries conservation management. To address this knowledge gap and stimulate the exchange of new data and ideas on behaviors, patterns, and processes relating to fish and fisheries in darkness, Fish at Night: an international symposium was held in Miami, Florida (USA), from 18 to 20 November, 2015. Here, we synthesize the findings from the symposium, providing an overview on the state-of-knowledge of fish studies in the dark, identifying critical information gaps, and charting a course for future research. We focus our commentary and synthesis on six areas: (1) nocturnal fish behavior and ecology; (2) fishing, fisheries, and enforcement; (3) deep and polar seas; (4) diel fish distribution and abundance comparisons; (5) methods for studying fish in darkness; (6) human threats to fish at night; and (7) larval fish at night. Taken together, we attempt to “shine a light” on fish at night, generating a greater interest and understanding of fishes and fisheries during darkness.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-4977 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1837
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Author Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.; Dauchy, R.T.; Hanifin, J.P.; Davidson, L.K.; Krause, J.A.; Sauer, L.A.; Rivera-Bermudez, M.A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Jasser, S.A.; Lynch, D.T.; Rollag, M.D.; Zalatan, F.
Title Melatonin-depleted blood from premenopausal women exposed to light at night stimulates growth of human breast cancer xenografts in nude rats Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication (up) Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res
Volume 65 Issue 23 Pages 11174-11184
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*blood/genetics/pathology; Cell Growth Processes/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Humans; Light; Liver Neoplasms, Experimental/metabolism; Male; Melatonin/blood/*deficiency; Premenopause/blood; RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis/genetics; Rats; Rats, Nude; Receptors, Melatonin/biosynthesis/genetics; Transplantation, Heterologous
Abstract The increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers has been postulated to result from the suppression of pineal melatonin production by exposure to light at night. Exposure of rats bearing rat hepatomas or human breast cancer xenografts to increasing intensities of white fluorescent light during each 12-hour dark phase (0-345 microW/cm2) resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of nocturnal melatonin blood levels and a stimulation of tumor growth and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism to the mitogenic molecule 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid. Venous blood samples were collected from healthy, premenopausal female volunteers during either the daytime, nighttime, or nighttime following 90 minutes of ocular bright, white fluorescent light exposure at 580 microW/cm2 (i.e., 2,800 lx). Compared with tumors perfused with daytime-collected melatonin-deficient blood, human breast cancer xenografts and rat hepatomas perfused in situ, with nocturnal, physiologically melatonin-rich blood collected during the night, exhibited markedly suppressed proliferative activity and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism. Tumors perfused with melatonin-deficient blood collected following ocular exposure to light at night exhibited the daytime pattern of high tumor proliferative activity. These results are the first to show that the tumor growth response to exposure to light during darkness is intensity dependent and that the human nocturnal, circadian melatonin signal not only inhibits human breast cancer growth but that this effect is extinguished by short-term ocular exposure to bright, white light at night. These mechanistic studies are the first to provide a rational biological explanation for the increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers.
Address Laboratory of Chrono-Neuroendocrine Oncology, Bassett Research Institute, The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York 13326, USA. david.blask@bassett.org
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ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:16322268 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 721
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Author Raiewski, E.E.; Elliott, J.A.; Evans, J.A.; Glickman, G.L.; Gorman, M.R.
Title Twice daily melatonin peaks in Siberian but not Syrian hamsters under 24 h light:dark:light:dark cycles Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 29 Issue 9 Pages 1206-1215
Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cricetinae; Male; Melatonin/blood/*secretion; Mesocricetus/blood/*physiology; Motor Activity/physiology; Phodopus/blood/*physiology; Photoperiod; Species Specificity
Abstract The daily pattern of blood-borne melatonin varies seasonally under the control of a multi-oscillator circadian pacemaker. Here we examine patterns of melatonin secretion and locomotor activity in Siberian and Syrian hamsters entrained to bimodal LDLD8:4:8:4 and LD20:4 lighting schedules that facilitate novel temporal arrangements of component circadian oscillators. Under LDLD, both species robustly bifurcated wheel-running activity in distinct day scotophase (DS) and night scotophase (NS) bouts. Siberian hamsters displayed significant melatonin increases during each scotophase in LDLD, and in the single daily scotophase of LD20:4. The bimodal melatonin secretion pattern persisted in acutely extended 16 h scotophases. Syrian hamsters, in contrast, showed no significant increases in plasma melatonin during either scotophase of LDLD8:4:8:4 or in LD20:4. In this species, detectable levels were observed only when the DS of LDLD was acutely extended to yield 16 h of darkness. Established species differences in the phase lag of nocturnal melatonin secretion relative to activity onset may underlie the above contrast: In non-bifurcated entrainment to 24 h LD cycles, Siberian hamsters show increased melatonin secretion within approximately 2 h after activity onset, whereas in Syrian hamsters, detectable melatonin secretion phase lags activity onset and the L/D transition by at least 4 h. The present results provide new evidence indicating multi-oscillator regulation of the waveform of melatonin secretion, specifically, the circadian control of the onset, offset and duration of nocturnal secretion.
Address Department of Psychology, and Center for Chronobiology, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0109, USA. eraiewski@ucsd.edu
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:23003567 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 85
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