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Author Mège, P.; Ödeen, A.; Théry, M.; Picard, D.; Secondi, J.
Title Partial Opsin Sequences Suggest UV-Sensitive Vision is Widespread in Caudata Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Evolutionary Biology Abbreviated Journal Evol. Biol.
Volume Issue Pages 1-10
Keywords Animals; Caudata; amphibians; ultraviolet; ultraviolet vision; opsin; photobiology; SWS1; Paralog gene; Tuning site; Nocturnal species; Sliding window; Ka/Ks
Abstract Ultraviolet (UV) vision exists in several animal groups. Intuitively, one would expect this trait to be favoured in species living in bright environments, where UV light is the most present. However, UV sensitivity, as deduced from sequences of UV photoreceptors and/or ocular media transmittance, is also present in nocturnal species, raising questions about the selective pressure maintaining this perceptual ability. Amphibians are among the most nocturnal vertebrates but their visual ecology remains poorly understood relative to other groups. Perhaps because many of these species breed in environments that filter out a large part of UV radiation, physiological and behavioural studies of UV sensitivity in this group are scarce. We investigated the extent of UV vision in Caudata, the order of amphibians with the most nocturnal habits. We could recover sequences of the UV sensitive SWS1 opsin in 40 out of 58 species, belonging to 6 families. In all of these species, the evidence suggests the presence of functional SWS1 opsins under purifying selection, potentially allowing UV vision. Interestingly, most species whose opsin genes failed to amplify exhibited particular ecological features that could drive the loss of UV vision. This likely wide distribution of functional UV photoreceptors in Caudata sheds a new light on the visual ecology of amphibians and questions the function of UV vision in nocturnal animal species.
Address GECCO, Université d’Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045, Angers, France; pascal.mege(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0071-3260 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1299
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Author Leskey, T.; Lee, D.-H.; Glenn, D.; Morrison, W.
Title Behavioral Responses of the Invasive Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) to Light-Based Stimuli in the Laboratory and Field Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Insect Behavior Abbreviated Journal J. of Insect Behav.
Volume 28 Issue 6 Pages 674-692
Keywords Animals; Brown marmorated stink bug; light trap; visual ecology; IPM; wavelength; Halyomorpha halys; invasive species
Abstract Halyomorpha halys (Stål), brown marmorated stink bug, is an invasive insect native to Asia that was accidentally introduced into the United States. The species is a polyphagous pest that has caused serious economic injury to specialty and row crops in the mid-Atlantic region. Growers have targeted H. halys with broad-spectrum materials by increasing the number of and decreasing the interval between insecticide applications. While it is known that adults reliably respond to semiochemical cues, much less is known about the response of H. halys to visual stimuli. Field observations suggest that H. halys adults respond to light-based stimuli, with large aggregations of adults documented at outdoor light sources and captured in commercial blacklight traps. Therefore, we conducted a series of studies aimed at identifying optimal wavelengths and intensities of light attractive to H. halys adults. We found that intensity and wavelength of light affected H. halys response in the laboratory and field. In the laboratory, H. halys demonstrated positive phototactic responses to full-spectrum and wavelength-restricted stimuli at a range of intensities, though the levels of stimulus acceptance and attraction, respectively, changed according to intensity. The species is most attracted to white, blue and black (ultraviolet) wavelength-restricted stimuli in the laboratory and field. In the field, traps baited with blue light sources were less attractive to non-target insect species, but white light sources were more attractive to H. halys indicating that these two light sources may be good candidates for inclusion in light-based monitoring traps.
Address USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 2217 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV, 25430-2771, USA; tracy.leskey(at)ars.usda.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0892-7553 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1300
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Author Clewley, G.D.; Plummer, K.E.; Robinson, R.A.; Simm, C.H.; Toms, M.P.
Title The effect of artificial lighting on the arrival time of birds using garden feeding stations in winter: A missed opportunity? Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal Urban Ecosystems
Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 535–546
Keywords Animals; Artificial light; Citizen science; Foraging; Garden birds; Supplementary feeding; Urbanization
Abstract The proliferation of artificial lighting at night is one of the key anthropogenic changes associated with urbanised areas as well as some non-urban areas. Disruption to natural light/dark regimes can have considerable effects on the timing of different behaviours of birds, particularly during the breeding season. However, the effect of artificial lights on the timing of behaviours during winter has received relatively little attention, despite the fact that time partitioning of foraging can have implications for avian winter survival. In this study, we assess at a landscape scale during winter, whether birds arrive at feeding stations earlier in areas with increased levels of artificial lighting using data from a citizen science project. Arrival times of the ten most commonly recorded species were associated with a combination of the density of artificial lights, temperature, rainfall and urban land cover. We found no evidence that birds advance the onset of foraging in gardens with more artificial lights nearby; contrary to our prediction, birds generally arrived later into these areas. This is possibly a response to differences in food availability or predation risk in areas with more artificial lights. We conclude that artificial light at night may not be as important for driving the timing of foraging behaviour in winter as previously thought, but it remains to be seen whether this represents a missed opportunity to extend the foraging period or an adaptive response.
Address British Trust for Ornithology, The Nunnery, Thetford, Norfolk, IP24 2PU, UK; gary.clewley(at)bto.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1083-8155 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1316
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Author Shaw, R.
Title Night as Fragmenting Frontier: Understanding the Night that Remains in an era of24/7: Night as Fragmenting Frontier Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Geography Compass Abbreviated Journal Geography Compass
Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages 637-647
Keywords Society; geography; social science
Abstract Social scientists have previously understood the night through a frontier metaphor. This has pitched night as an empty or lightly inhabited space into which the urban, capitalist day has been expanding. The contemporary increase in nocturnal research has complicated this picture, showing an increasing multiplicity of complexly lived, structured and experienced nights across the globe. This paper looks to retrieve the concept of night as frontier by drawing on postcolonial theories to generate a more subtle conceptualisation of ‘frontier’, while also arguing that recent research reveals that this frontier is now fragmenting. By exploring research into a series of core themes – artificial light at night and darkness; night-lives; and global nights – I then explore what such an understanding of night allows us to say about current research. As nocturnal social science continues to mature, a more critical eye will need to be paid to the complexity of shifting power relations and identities within this fragmenting nocturnal frontier.
Address School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, Claremont Tower, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 7RU; robert.shaw2(at)ncl.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1749-8198 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1326
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Author Vozzi, C.; Ramponi, R.
Title 2015 International Year of Light and beyond Type Magazine Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Optics Abbreviated Journal J. Opt.
Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 010201
Keywords Commentary; International Year of Light; IYL; IYL2015; society
Abstract The 2015 International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL) is now approaching its end. It has been a year full of excitement worldwide, involving people of all ages in an incredible number of different activities
Address Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN-CNR) Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan, Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2040-8978 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1428
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