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Author Henderson, J.V.; Storeygard, A.; Weil, D.N.
Title Measuring Economic Growth From Outer Space Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication The American Economic Review Abbreviated Journal Am Econ Rev
Volume (down) 102 Issue 2 Pages 994-1028
Keywords satellite data; remote sensing; economics; social science
Abstract GDP growth is often measured poorly for countries and rarely measured at all for cities or subnational regions. We propose a readily available proxy: satellite data on lights at night. We develop a statistical framework that uses lights growth to augment existing income growth measures, under the assumption that measurement error in using observed light as an indicator of income is uncorrelated with measurement error in national income accounts. For countries with good national income accounts data, information on growth of lights is of marginal value in estimating the true growth rate of income, while for countries with the worst national income accounts, the optimal estimate of true income growth is a composite with roughly equal weights. Among poor-data countries, our new estimate of average annual growth differs by as much as 3 percentage points from official data. Lights data also allow for measurement of income growth in sub- and supranational regions. As an application, we examine growth in Sub Saharan African regions over the last 17 years. We find that real incomes in non-coastal areas have grown faster by 1/3 of an annual percentage point than coastal areas; non-malarial areas have grown faster than malarial ones by 1/3 to 2/3 annual percent points; and primate city regions have grown no faster than hinterland areas. Such applications point toward a research program in which “empirical growth” need no longer be synonymous with “national income accounts.”
Address National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Economic Association Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-8282 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25067841; PMCID:PMC4108272 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 364
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Author Łopuszyńska, A.; Bartyna-Zielińska, M.; Kaźmierczak, B.; Jadwiszczak, P.; Kutyłowska, M.; Miller, U.
Title Lighting of urban green areas – the case of Grabiszyn Park in Wrocław. Searching for the balance between light and darkness through social and technical issues Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication E3S Web of Conferences Abbreviated Journal E3S Web Conf.
Volume (down) 100 Issue Pages 00049
Keywords Society; Lighting
Abstract Illuminating the urban green spaces could lead to conflicts of spatial, technical and social nature. This relatively new, though already global, problem is expected to grow bigger with the further increase of urban areas artificial brightness. The case of Grabiszyn Park in Wrocław is an example of how difficult it is to find a balance between big-city lights and a natural darkness. The situation is even more difficult if the light is not legally recognized as a significant source of air pollution and direct nuisance at the legal level. The aim of the paper is to recognize the broader perspective of urban greenery lighting issues, global recommendations basis and the local awareness. The authors also made an attempt to analyze and assess the project implementation, as well as to characterize the components of the quality of an urban green areas lighting.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2267-1242 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2603
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Author Horrace, W.C.; Rohlin, S.M.
Title How Dark Is Dark? Bright Lights, Big City, Racial Profiling Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Review of Economics and Statistics Abbreviated Journal Review of Economics and Statistics
Volume (down) 98 Issue 2 Pages 226-232
Keywords Psychology; Public Safety; Society
Abstract Grogger and Ridgeway (2006) use the daylight saving time shift to develop a police racial profiling test that is based on differences in driver race visibility and (hence) the race distribution of traffic stops across daylight and darkness. However, urban environments may be well lit at night, eroding the power of their test. We refine their test using streetlight location data in Syracuse, New York, and the results change in the direction of finding profiling of black drivers. Our preferred specification suggests that the odds of a black driver being stopped (relative to nonblack drivers) increase 15% in daylight compared to darkness.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-6535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2167
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Author Levin, N.; Ali, S.; Crandall, D.
Title Utilizing remote sensing and big data to quantify conflict intensity: The Arab Spring as a case study Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Applied Geography Abbreviated Journal Applied Geography
Volume (down) 94 Issue Pages 1-17
Keywords Remote Sensing; Society; Human Health
Abstract Tracking global and regional conflict zones requires spatially explicit information in near real-time. Here, we examined the potential of remote sensing time-series data (night lights) and big data (data mining of news events and Flickr photos) for monitoring and understanding crisis development and refugee flows. We used the recent Arab Spring as a case study, and examined temporal trends in monthly time series of variables which we hypothesized to indicate conflict intensity, covering all Arab countries. Both Flickr photos and night-time lights proved as sensitive indicators for loss of economic and human capital, and news items from the Global Data on Events, Location and Tone (GDELT) project on fight events were positively correlated with actual deaths from conflicts. We propose that big data and remote sensing datasets have potential to provide disaggregated and timely data on conflicts where official statistics are lacking, offering an effective approach for monitoring geopolitical and environmental changes on Earth.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-6228 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1918
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Author Hammerschlag, N.; Meyer, C.G.; Grace, M.S.; Kessel, S.T.; Sutton, T.T.; Harvey, E.S.; Paris-Limouzy, C.B.; Kerstetter, D.W.; Cooke, S.J.
Title Shining a light on fish at night: an overview of fish and fisheries in the dark of night, and in deep and polar seas Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Bulletin of Marine Science Abbreviated Journal bms
Volume (down) 93 Issue 2 Pages 253-284
Keywords Animals; Economics; Society
Abstract In aquatic environments, what one observes during the day can differ substantially by night. The species composition and associated ecological processes that occur during the day are often different than night. In polar seas and at great depths, “night” can span, months, years, and beyond. Teleosts and elasmobranchs have evolved unique sensory and behavioral modalities for living in darkness. As a consequence, fishers have adopted unique strategies for exploiting fish at night or in dark systems. We propose that neglecting the night has led to an incomplete understanding of aquatic organismal ecology, population/community dynamics, and ecosystem function with consequences for fisheries conservation management. To address this knowledge gap and stimulate the exchange of new data and ideas on behaviors, patterns, and processes relating to fish and fisheries in darkness, Fish at Night: an international symposium was held in Miami, Florida (USA), from 18 to 20 November, 2015. Here, we synthesize the findings from the symposium, providing an overview on the state-of-knowledge of fish studies in the dark, identifying critical information gaps, and charting a course for future research. We focus our commentary and synthesis on six areas: (1) nocturnal fish behavior and ecology; (2) fishing, fisheries, and enforcement; (3) deep and polar seas; (4) diel fish distribution and abundance comparisons; (5) methods for studying fish in darkness; (6) human threats to fish at night; and (7) larval fish at night. Taken together, we attempt to “shine a light” on fish at night, generating a greater interest and understanding of fishes and fisheries during darkness.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-4977 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1837
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