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Author Haraguchi, S.; Kamata, M.; Tokita, T.; Tashiro, K.-I.; Sato, M.; Nozaki, M.; Okamoto-Katsuyama, M.; Shimizu, I.; Han, G.; Chowdhury, V.S.; Lei, X.-F.; Miyazaki, T.; Kim-Kaneyama, J.-R.; Nakamachi, T.; Matsuda, K.; Ohtaki, H.; Tokumoto, T.; Tachibana, T.; Miyazaki, A.; Tsutsui, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-at-night exposure affects brain development through pineal allopregnanolone-dependent mechanisms Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication ELife Abbreviated Journal Elife  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages e45306  
  Keywords Animals; chicken; neuroscience; Circadian disruption; pineal allopregnanolone; cell death  
  Abstract The molecular mechanisms by which environmental light conditions affect cerebellar development are incompletely understood. We showed that circadian disruption by light-at-night induced Purkinje cell death through pineal allopregnanolone (ALLO) activity during early life in chicks. Light-at-night caused the loss of diurnal variation of pineal ALLO synthesis during early life and led to cerebellar Purkinje cell death, which was suppressed by a daily injection of ALLO. The loss of diurnal variation of pineal ALLO synthesis induced not only reduction in pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), a neuroprotective hormone, but also transcriptional repression of the cerebellar Adcyap1 gene that produces PACAP, with subsequent Purkinje cell death. Taken together, pineal ALLO mediated the effect of light on early cerebellar development in chicks.  
  Address Department of Biology, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan; shogo.haraguchi(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher eLife Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2050-084X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31566568 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2694  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schulte-Römer, N. url  openurl
  Title What is French about the “French fear of darkness”? The co-production of imagined communities of light and energy Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Journal of Energy History Revue d'Histoire de l'Energie Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages  
  Keywords History; Society; Energy; Lighting; France  
  Abstract This essay takes expert assumptions about light preferences as a starting point for a historical inquiry into what I call imagined sociotechnical communities of light and energy. My argument is that historical energy supply systems produced these imaginaries and vice versa, shifting the scales at which public lighting was envisioned and darkness was acceptable. While in the 17th C. dark streets were the norm and even the illumination of single streets was publically contested, innovators of the 18th C. imagined gas light and energy on an urban scale. In the 20th C., electric lighting promoted electrification and the electricity supply systems in countries like France allowed experts to think and standardize lighting at a national level. In the 21st C. the expert imaginary of a light-loving French people is challenged by public environmental concern.  
  Address Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2709  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pritchard, S.B. url  openurl
  Title Epilogue. Field notes from the end of the world: Light, darkness, Energy, and endscape in polar night Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Journal of Energy History Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Darkness; Lighting; Society; Psychology  
  Abstract This personal essay describes light(s) and darkness(es) in Longyearbyen, Svalbard (Norway) during polar night in January 2019. Drawing on autoethnographic methods, I also seek to describe how I experienced the remarkable lightscapes and darkscapes of the far north during winter. I suggest how the history of energy in Longyearbyen has both shaped and been shaped by the “extreme” light/dark cycle of the high Arctic. In the process, I develop the concept of “endscape” to characterize vestiges of a landscape that has been, and will continue to be, transformed by global climate change, and will eventually disappear. This recent experience illustrates the potential of experiential, reflexive ways of contending with light/dark. It also draws attention to tensions in the academic study of light/dark and the history of energy, and how they play out in practice, in the context of a conference held in a remote location that requires scholars to contribute to the continued extraction of fossil fuels –something that most would otherwise decry. I suggest that Longyearbyen is a useful case study for other endscapes in the early 21st C.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2722  
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Author Lapostolle, D.; Challéat, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lutter contre la pollution lumineuse: Trois processus de valorisation de l’obscurité dans les territoires français Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication VertigO Abbreviated Journal vertigo  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords Society; Light pollution; France; Europe  
  Abstract The degradation of darkness through the use of artificial light at night (ALAN) in and around human infrastructures is termed light pollution. This pollution is intrinsically related to urbanization and spills out from urban areas to affect rural areas and protected areas. The fight against light pollution is being organized in several countries where local communities are experimenting with environmental policies to protect darkness. The challenge bears on both the preservation of biodiversity and the energy transition. In France, a few pioneering rural areas are experimenting with mechanisms that include this dual implication. Two of them provide the case study for this article. We show how these areas turn darkness into a specific resource. We identify three specification processes. The first, obeying an anthropocentric utilitarian rationale, is part of the “economicization” of the environment in the line of shallow ecology. The second, following a rationale of ecocentric conservation, is part of the radical greening of the economy, in line with deep ecology. The third follows an integrated social-ecological system rationale enshrining the interdependence between development and planning and the preservation of biodiversity and energy savings. Specification controversies beset local areas. These areas become incubation rooms, that is, spaces for resolving these controversies that are reflected in a transition operator enabling the local area to take a fresh trajectory in terms of development and planning.  
  Address Aménagement, UMR CNRS 6049 ThéMA, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 2 boulevard Gabriel, 21000 Dijon, France; dany.lapostolle(at)u-bourgogne.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language French Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1492-8442 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2784  
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Author Acuto, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title We need a science of the night Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 576 Issue 7787 Pages 339  
  Keywords *Policy; *Society; *Commentary  
  Abstract (none)  
  Address Connected Cities Lab, University of Melbourne; michele.acuto(at)unimelb.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Nature Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31853076 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2792  
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