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Author (up) Colman, L.P.; Lara, P.H.; Bennie, J.; Broderick, A.C.; de Freitas, J.R.; Marcondes, A.; Witt, M.J.; Godley, B.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing coastal artificial light and potential exposure of wildlife at a national scale: the case of marine turtles in Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Biodiversity and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biodivers Conserv  
  Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 1135-1152  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial light; Coastal development; Remote sensing; Loggerhead turtle; Hawksbill turtle; Olive ridley turtle; Leatherback turtle; marine turtles; Dermochelys coriacea; Lepidochelys olivacea; Eretmochelys imbricata; Caretta caretta  
  Abstract Coastal areas provide critical nesting habitat for marine turtles. Understanding how artificial light might impact populations is key to guide management strategies. Here we assess the extent to which nesting populations of four marine turtle species—leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea), olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea), hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) and two subpopulations of loggerhead (Caretta caretta) turtles—are exposed to light pollution across 604 km of the Brazilian coast. We used yearly night-time satellite images from two 5-year periods (1992–1996 and 2008–2012) from the US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Programme (DMSP) to determine the proportion of nesting areas that are exposed to detectable levels of artificial light and identify how this has changed over time. Over the monitored time-frame, 63.7% of the nesting beaches experienced an increase in night light levels. Based on nest densities, we identified 54 reproductive hotspots: 62.9% were located in areas potentially exposed to light pollution. Light levels appeared to have a significant effect on nest densities of hawksbills and the northern loggerhead turtle stock, however high nest densities were also seen in lit areas. The status of all species/subpopulations has improved across the time period despite increased light levels. These findings suggest that (1) nest site selection is likely primarily determined by variables other than light and (2) conservation strategies in Brazil appear to have been successful in contributing to reducing impacts on nesting beaches. There is, however, the possibility that light also affects hatchlings in coastal waters, and impacts on population recruitment may take longer to fully manifest in nesting numbers. Recommendations are made to further this work to provide deeper insights into the impacts of anthropogenic light on marine turtles.  
  Address Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, TR10 9EZ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-3115 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3382  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fritsches, K.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Australian Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings do not avoid yellow Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology Abbreviated Journal Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology  
  Volume 45 Issue 2 Pages 79-89  
  Keywords Flatback turtle; Natator depressus; animals; reptiles; marine turtles; turtles; Loggerhead turtle; Caretta caretta  
  Abstract When emerging from the nest, sea turtle hatchlings primarily orient using visual stimuli, with light pollution known to disrupt effective sea localization behavior. Previous studies have shown that sea turtle hatchlings respond differently to different wavelengths of light but Loggerhead hatchlings, exclusively among species tested, have a strong aversion to yellow light (at 600 nm). This study repeats these experiments with an Australian population of Loggerhead hatchlings (Caretta caretta) and Flatback hatchlings (Natator depressus). The orientation preference was measured using a modified y-maze set-up with the animals response observed using an infrared camera. This study showed that both Loggerhead and Flatback hatchlings can see and are attracted to light in the ultraviolet waveband (365 nm) and, to a lesser extent to longer wavelengths of 600 nm and above. The surprising finding was that the Loggerhead hatchlings tested here, unlike their conspecifics in Florida, do not show any avoidance to yellow but are attracted to bright lights of wavelength between 365 nm (UV) and 600 nm. This suggests potential differences in the visual behavior among different populations of sea turtles of the same species. No difference was detected in the response of Loggerhead hatchlings to flickering or steady light stimuli.  
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  ISSN 1023-6244 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 75  
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Author (up) Lorne, J.; Salmon, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Endangered Species Research Abbreviated Journal Endang. Species Res.  
  Volume 3 Issue Pages 23-30  
  Keywords Sea-finding · Orientation; Migration; Sea turtle; Loggerhead turtle; Caretta caretta; Photopollution; animals; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles  
  Abstract Artificial lighting disrupts sea turtle hatchling orientation from the nest to the sea. We studied how a light-induced landward crawl affects the later ability of hatchlings to crawl to the sea, and to swim away from the shore from a dark beach. A brief (2 min) landward crawl had no effect on swimming orientation as long as surface waves were present. In a calm sea, landward-crawling hatchlings failed to swim offshore, while those crawling seaward were well oriented. A long (2 h) crawl toward a landward light source, however, impaired the ability of hatchlings to crawl seaward. These results demonstrate that orientation toward artificial light sources compromises the ability of hatchlings to respond to natural orientation cues, both on land and in the sea. Based on these results, we suggest several changes to current management practices used when releasing misoriented turtles in the wild.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1863-5407 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 77  
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Author (up) Mazor, T.; Levin, N.; Possingham, H.P.; Levy, Y.; Rocchini, D.; Richardson, A.J.; Kark, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can satellite-based night lights be used for conservation? The case of nesting sea turtles in the Mediterranean Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 159 Issue Pages 63-72  
  Keywords Artificial night lights; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; Coastal conservation; Satellite imagery; Sea turtle conservation  
  Abstract Artificial night lights pose a major threat to multiple species. However, this threat is often disregarded in conservation management and action because it is difficult to quantify its effect. Increasing availability of high spatial-resolution satellite images may enable us to better incorporate this threat into future work, particularly in highly modified ecosystems such as the coastal zone. In this study we examine the potential of satellite night light imagery to predict the distribution of the endangered loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and green (Chelonia mydas) sea turtle nests in the eastern Mediterranean coastline. Using remote sensing tools and high resolution data derived from the SAC-C satellite and the International Space Station, we examined the relationship between the long term spatial patterns of sea turtle nests and the intensity of night lights along Israel’s entire Mediterranean coastline. We found that sea turtles nests are negatively related to night light intensity and are concentrated in darker sections along the coast. Our resulting GLMs showed that night lights were a significant factor for explaining the distribution of sea turtle nests. Other significant variables included: cliff presence, human population density and infrastructure. This study is one of the first to show that night lights estimated with satellite-based imagery can be used to help explain sea turtle nesting activity at a detailed resolution over large areas. This approach can facilitate the management of species affected by night lights, and will be particularly useful in areas that are inaccessible or where broad-scale prioritization of conservation action is required.  
  Address ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 213  
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Author (up) Sella, K.N.; Salmon, M.; Witherington, B.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Filtered Streetlights Attract Hatchling Marine Turtles Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal Chelonian Conservation and Biology  
  Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 255-261  
  Keywords Reptilia; Testudines; Cheloniidae; Loggerhead turtle; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; hatchlings; artificial lighting; light “trapping”; orientation; seafinding; Florida  
  Abstract On many nesting beaches, hatchling marine turtles are exposed to poled street lighting that disrupts their ability to crawl to the sea. Experiments were done to determine how hatchlings responded to street lighting transmitted through 2 filters that excluded the most disruptive wavelengths (those <&#8201;530 nm; those <&#8201;570 nm). Filtered lighting, however, also attracted the turtles though not as strongly as an unfiltered (high-pressure sodium vapor) lighting. Filtering is therefore of limited utility for light management, especially since other alternatives (such as lowering, shielding, or turning off unnecessary lighting; use of dimmer lights embedded in roadways) are more effective.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1071-8443 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 78  
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