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Author Haus, E.L.; Smolensky, M.H.
Title Shift work and cancer risk: potential mechanistic roles of circadian disruption, light at night, and sleep deprivation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med Rev
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 273-284
Keywords Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Epigenesis, Genetic/physiology; Humans; Light; Melatonin/physiology; Neoplasms/*etiology; Risk Factors; Sleep Deprivation/*complications; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology; oncogenesis
Abstract Shift work that includes a nighttime rotation has become an unavoidable attribute of today's 24-h society. The related disruption of the human circadian time organization leads in the short-term to an array of jet-lag-like symptoms, and in the long-run it may contribute to weight gain/obesity, metabolic syndrome/type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic studies also suggest increased cancer risk, especially for breast cancer, in night and rotating female shift workers. If confirmed in more controlled and detailed studies, the carcinogenic effect of night and shift work will constitute additional serious medical, economic, and social problems for a substantial proportion of the working population. Here, we examine the possible multiple and interconnected cancer-promoting mechanisms as a consequence of shift work, i.e., repeated disruption of the circadian system, pineal hormone melatonin suppression by exposure to light at night, sleep-deprivation-caused impairment of the immune system, plus metabolic changes favoring obesity and generation of proinflammatory reactive oxygen species.
Address Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, University of Minnesota and Health Partners Medical Group, Regions Hospital, 640 Jackson Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 55101, USA. Erhard.X.Haus@HealthPartners.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1087-0792 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23137527 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 157
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Author Oesch-Bartlomowicz, B.; Weiss, C.; Dietrich, C.; Oesch, F.
Title Circadian rhythms and chemical carcinogenesis: Potential link. An overview Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Mutation Research Abbreviated Journal Mutat Res
Volume 680 Issue 1-2 Pages 83-86
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Carcinogens/*toxicity; Cell Cycle/physiology; Cell Cycle Proteins/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*drug effects/physiology; DNA/drug effects; DNA Damage; DNA Repair; Homeostasis/physiology; Humans; Neoplasms/*etiology/physiopathology; Period Circadian Proteins/metabolism
Abstract Circadian rhythm is an integral and not replaceable part of the organism's homeostasis. Its signalling is multidimensional, overlooking global networks such as chromatin remodelling, cell cycle, DNA damage and repair as well as nuclear receptors function. Understanding its global networking will allow us to follow up not only organism dysfunction and pathology (including chemical carcinogenesis) but well-being in general having in mind that time is not always on our side.
Address ECNIS Unit, University of Mainz, D-55131 Mainz, Germany. oeschb@uni-mainz.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-5107 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19836463 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 790
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Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E.
Title Adverse health effects of nighttime lighting: comments on American Medical Association policy statement Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication American Journal of Preventive Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Prev Med
Volume 45 Issue 3 Pages 343-346
Keywords American Medical Association; Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; DNA Damage/physiology; *Health Policy; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; United States
Abstract The American Medical Association House of Delegates in June of 2012 adopted a policy statement on nighttime lighting and human health. This major policy statement summarizes the scientific evidence that nighttime electric light can disrupt circadian rhythms in humans and documents the rapidly advancing understanding from basic science of how disruption of circadian rhythmicity affects aspects of physiology with direct links to human health, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and metabolism. The human evidence is also accumulating, with the strongest epidemiologic support for a link of circadian disruption from light at night to breast cancer. There are practical implications of the basic and epidemiologic science in the form of advancing lighting technologies that better accommodate human circadian rhythmicity.
Address University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0749-3797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23953362 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 130
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