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Author Özyürek, C.; Aydin, G. url  openurl
  Title Students’ Opinions on the Light Pollution Application Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education Abbreviated Journal IEJEE  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 55-68  
  Keywords Society; awareness; perception; education; child development; light pollution  
  Abstract The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of computer-animated concept cartoons and outdoor science activities on creating awareness among seventh graders about light pollution. It also aims to identify the views of the students on the activities that were carried out. This study used one group pre-test/post-test experimental design model with 30 seventh graders. The data in the study were collected via open-ended questions on light pollution and semi-structured interview questions. The open-ended questions on light pollution were administered as a pre-test and a post-test. After the post-test was administered, semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven students. The data collected from the open-ended questions and semi-structured interviews were qualitatively analysed and quotes from the students’ statements were included. Looking at the answers of the students to questions on light pollution, it was understood that the activities that were carried out were effective. Furthermore, all of the students that were interviewed made positive statements about the activities that were carried out.  
  Address Ordu University, Turkey  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher T&K Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1307-9298 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1288  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bijveld, M.M.C.; van Genderen, M.M.; Hoeben, F.P.; Katzin, A.A.; van Nispen, R.M.A.; Riemslag, F.C.C.; Kappers, A.M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of night vision problems in patients with congenital stationary night blindness Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages e62927  
  Keywords Vision; Adolescent; Adult; Case-Control Studies; Child; *Dark Adaptation; Electroretinography; Eye Diseases, Hereditary/*physiopathology; Female; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/*physiopathology; Humans; Light; Male; Middle Aged; Myopia/*physiopathology; Night Blindness/*physiopathology; *Night Vision; *Pattern Recognition, Visual; Surveys and Questionnaires; *Visual Acuity; Visual Fields  
  Abstract Congenital Stationary Night Blindness (CSNB) is a retinal disorder caused by a signal transmission defect between photoreceptors and bipolar cells. CSNB can be subdivided in CSNB2 (rod signal transmission reduced) and CSNB1 (rod signal transmission absent). The present study is the first in which night vision problems are assessed in CSNB patients in a systematic way, with the purpose of improving rehabilitation for these patients. We assessed the night vision problems of 13 CSNB2 patients and 9 CSNB1 patients by means of a questionnaire on low luminance situations. We furthermore investigated their dark adapted visual functions by the Goldmann Weekers dark adaptation curve, a dark adapted static visual field, and a two-dimensional version of the “Light Lab”. In the latter test, a digital image of a living room with objects was projected on a screen. While increasing the luminance of the image, we asked the patients to report on detection and recognition of objects. The questionnaire showed that the CSNB2 patients hardly experienced any night vision problems, while all CSNB1 patients experienced some problems although they generally did not describe them as severe. The three scotopic tests showed minimally to moderately decreased dark adapted visual functions in the CSNB2 patients, with differences between patients. In contrast, the dark adapted visual functions of the CSNB1 patients were more severely affected, but showed almost no differences between patients. The results from the “2D Light Lab” showed that all CSNB1 patients were blind at low intensities (equal to starlight), but quickly regained vision at higher intensities (full moonlight). Just above their dark adapted thresholds both CSNB1 and CSNB2 patients had normal visual fields. From the results we conclude that night vision problems in CSNB, in contrast to what the name suggests, are not conspicuous and generally not disabling.  
  Address Bartimeus Institute for the Visually Impaired, Zeist, The Netherlands. mbijveld@bartimeus.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23658786; PMCID:PMC3643903 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3051  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Higuchi, S.; Lee, S.-I.; Kozaki, T.; Harada, T.; Tanaka, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Late circadian phase in adults and children is correlated with use of high color temperature light at home at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 448-452  
  Keywords Children; circadian rhythm; light; melatonin  
  Abstract Light is the strongest synchronizer of human circadian rhythms, and exposure to residential light at night reportedly causes a delay of circadian rhythms. The present study was conducted to investigate the association between color temperature of light at home and circadian phase of salivary melatonin in adults and children. Twenty healthy children (mean age: 9.7 year) and 17 of their parents (mean age: 41.9 years) participated in the experiment. Circadian phase assessments were made with dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). There were large individual variations in DLMO both in adults and children. The average DLMO in adults and in children were 21:50 +/- 1:12 and 20:55 +/- 0:44, respectively. The average illuminance and color temperature of light at eye level were 139.6 +/- 82.7 lx and 3862.0 +/- 965.6 K, respectively. There were significant correlations between color temperature of light and DLMO in adults (r = 0.735, p < 0.01) and children (r = 0.479, p < 0.05), although no significant correlations were found between illuminance level and DLMO. The results suggest that high color temperature light at home might be a cause of the delay of circadian phase in adults and children.  
  Address a Department of Human Science, Faculty of Design , Kyushu University , Fukuoka , Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27010525 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1404  
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Author Higuchi, S.; Nagafuchi, Y.; Lee, S.-I.; Harada, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of Light at Night on Melatonin Suppression in Children Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 99 Issue 9 Pages 3298-3303  
  Keywords melatonin; light at night; photobiology; children  
  Abstract Context: The sensitivity of melatonin to light suppression is expected to be higher in children since children have large pupils and pure crystal lenses. However, melatonin suppression by light in children remains unclear. Objective: We investigated whether light-induced melatonin suppression in children is larger than that in adults. Methods: Thirty-three healthy primary school children (mean age: 7.4 +/- 1.8 yr) and 29 healthy adults (mean age: 41.2 +/- 4.8 yr) participated in two experiments. In the first experiment, salivary melatonin concentrations in 13 children and 13 adults were measured at night under a dim light (< 30 lx) and moderately bright light (580 lx) in an experimental facility. Pupil diameters were also measured under dim light and bright light. In the second experiment, melatonin concentrations in 20 children and 16 adults were measured under dim light in the experimental facility and under room light at home (illuminance 140.0 +/- 82.7 lx). Results: In the experiment 1, the melatonin concentration was significantly decreased by exposure to moderately bright light in both adults and children. Melatonin suppression was significantly larger in children (88.2%, n=5) than in adults (46.3%, n=6) (p<0.01), although the data for some participants were excluded because melatonin concentrations had not yet risen. In the experiment 2, melatonin secretion was significantly suppressed by room light at home in children (n=15) (p<0.05) but not in adults (n=11). Conclusion: We found that the percentage of melatonin suppression by light in children was almost twice that in adults, suggesting that melatonin in children is more sensitive than that in adults to light at night.  
  Address Department of Human Science, Faculty of Design, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24840814 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 300  
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Author Kohyama, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A newly proposed disease condition produced by light exposure during night: asynchronization Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Brain & Development Abbreviated Journal Brain Dev  
  Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 255-273  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Biological Clocks; Child; Child, Preschool; Chronotherapy; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Complementary Therapies; Humans; Infant; Japan; *Light; Motor Activity; Phototherapy; Serotonin/metabolism; Sleep; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*physiopathology/therapy; Students; Wakefulness  
  Abstract The bedtime of preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan has become progressively later with the result sleep duration has become progressively shorter. With these changes, more than half of the preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan recently have complained of daytime sleepiness, while approximately one quarter of junior and senior high school students in Japan reportedly suffer from insomnia. These preschoolers/pupils/students may be suffering from behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome due to inadequate sleep hygiene. If this diagnosis is correct, they should be free from these complaints after obtaining sufficient sleep by avoiding inadequate sleep hygiene. However, such a therapeutic approach often fails. Although social factors are often involved in these sleep disturbances, a novel clinical notion--asynchronization--can further a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of these disturbances. The essence of asynchronization is a disturbance in various aspects (e.g., cycle, amplitude, phase and interrelationship) of the biological rhythms that normally exhibit circadian oscillation, presumably involving decreased activity of the serotonergic system. The major trigger of asynchronization is hypothesized to be a combination of light exposure during the night and a lack of light exposure in the morning. In addition to basic principles of morning light and an avoidance of nocturnal light exposure, presumable potential therapeutic approaches for asynchronization involve both conventional ones (light therapy, medications (hypnotics, antidepressants, melatonin, vitamin B12), physical activation, chronotherapy) and alternative ones (kampo, pulse therapy, direct contact, control of the autonomic nervous system, respiration (qigong, tanden breathing), chewing, crawling). A morning-type behavioral preference is described in several of the traditional textbooks for good health. The author recommends a morning-type behavioral lifestyle as a way to reduce behavioral/emotional problems, and to lessen the likelihood of falling into asynchronization.  
  Address Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Kita Shakai Hoken Hospital, 4-17-56 Akabanedai, Tokyo, Japan. j-kohyama@tokyokita-jadecom.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0387-7604 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:18757146 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 297  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.-X.; Korkmaz, A.; Ma, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Obesity and metabolic syndrome: association with chronodisruption, sleep deprivation, and melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med  
  Volume 44 Issue 6 Pages 564-577  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Animals; Child; Chronobiology Disorders/*epidemiology; Comorbidity; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Light/adverse effects; Melatonin/*deficiency/physiology; Metabolic Syndrome X/*epidemiology; Mice; Obesity/*epidemiology; Rats; Sleep Deprivation/*epidemiology  
  Abstract Obesity has become an epidemic in industrialized and developing countries. In 30 years, unless serious changes are made, a majority of adults and many children will be classified as overweight or obese. Whereas fatness alone endangers physiological performance of even simple tasks, the associated co-morbidity of obesity including metabolic syndrome in all its manifestations is a far more critical problem. If the current trend continues as predicted, health care systems may be incapable of handling the myriad of obesity-related diseases. The financial costs, including those due to medical procedures, absenteeism from work, and reduced economic productivity, will jeopardize the financial well-being of industries. The current review summarizes the potential contributions of three processes that may be contributing to humans becoming progressively more overweight: circadian or chronodisruption, sleep deficiency, and melatonin suppression. Based on the information provided in this survey, life-style factors (independent of the availability of abundant calorie-rich foods) may aggravate weight gain. Both epidemiological and experimental data support associations between disrupted physiological rhythms, a reduction in adequate sleep, and light-at-night-induced suppression of an essential endogenously produced molecule, melatonin. The implication is that if these problems were corrected with life-style changes, body-weight could possibly be more easily controlled.  
  Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UT Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA. reiter@uthscsa.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21668294 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 523  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vollmer, C.; Randler, C.; Di Milia, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Further evidence for the influence of photoperiod at birth on chronotype in a sample of German adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 10 Pages 1345-1351  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Child; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Germany; Humans; Male; Parturition/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Puberty/physiology; *Seasons; Sleep/*physiology  
  Abstract Individuals differ in their circadian preferences (chronotype). There is evidence in the literature to support a season-of-birth effect on chronotype but the evidence is not convincing. In part, the relationship is obscured by a number of methodological differences between studies, including the measures used to define morningness, the way in which the seasons were categorized, and the sample size. This study adds to the literature in several ways. First, we adopt a new approach to categorizing the photoperiod rather than the calendar season; thus we prefer to use the term photoperiod at birth. Second, we used two measures of morningness. Third, we used a large and homogeneous German sample. The results show that adolescents (n = 2905) born during the increasing photoperiod (Feb-Apr) had a significantly later midpoint of sleep (MSFsc) than those born during the decreasing photoperiod (Aug-Oct). A similar pattern was found for the Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM). Furthermore, both measures of chronotype demonstrated a significant quadratic function over a 1-yr cycle. When looking at each of six consecutive years separately, the Composite Scale of Morningness suggests a cosine rhythm linked to increasing and decreasing photoperiods that becomes weaker in amplitude with increasing age. Despite the strengths in our study, the effect of photoperiod at birth on chronotype remains small. Future studies may require larger sample sizes, may need to explore how neonatal light exposure modulates chronotype, and may need to track how puberty and adolescent lifestyle habits mask the photoperiod effect.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Education Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 561-2, Heidelberg, Germany. vollmer@ph-heidelberg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23130997 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 517  
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