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Author Kohyama, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A newly proposed disease condition produced by light exposure during night: asynchronization Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Brain & Development Abbreviated Journal Brain Dev  
  Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 255-273  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Biological Clocks; Child; Child, Preschool; Chronotherapy; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Complementary Therapies; Humans; Infant; Japan; *Light; Motor Activity; Phototherapy; Serotonin/metabolism; Sleep; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*physiopathology/therapy; Students; Wakefulness  
  Abstract The bedtime of preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan has become progressively later with the result sleep duration has become progressively shorter. With these changes, more than half of the preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan recently have complained of daytime sleepiness, while approximately one quarter of junior and senior high school students in Japan reportedly suffer from insomnia. These preschoolers/pupils/students may be suffering from behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome due to inadequate sleep hygiene. If this diagnosis is correct, they should be free from these complaints after obtaining sufficient sleep by avoiding inadequate sleep hygiene. However, such a therapeutic approach often fails. Although social factors are often involved in these sleep disturbances, a novel clinical notion--asynchronization--can further a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of these disturbances. The essence of asynchronization is a disturbance in various aspects (e.g., cycle, amplitude, phase and interrelationship) of the biological rhythms that normally exhibit circadian oscillation, presumably involving decreased activity of the serotonergic system. The major trigger of asynchronization is hypothesized to be a combination of light exposure during the night and a lack of light exposure in the morning. In addition to basic principles of morning light and an avoidance of nocturnal light exposure, presumable potential therapeutic approaches for asynchronization involve both conventional ones (light therapy, medications (hypnotics, antidepressants, melatonin, vitamin B12), physical activation, chronotherapy) and alternative ones (kampo, pulse therapy, direct contact, control of the autonomic nervous system, respiration (qigong, tanden breathing), chewing, crawling). A morning-type behavioral preference is described in several of the traditional textbooks for good health. The author recommends a morning-type behavioral lifestyle as a way to reduce behavioral/emotional problems, and to lessen the likelihood of falling into asynchronization.  
  Address Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Kita Shakai Hoken Hospital, 4-17-56 Akabanedai, Tokyo, Japan. j-kohyama@tokyokita-jadecom.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0387-7604 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:18757146 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 297  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Moser, M.; Schaumberger, K.; Schernhammer, E.; Stevens, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Cancer and rhythm Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 483-487  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Breast Neoplasms/etiology/physiopathology/prevention & control; Chronobiology Phenomena; Chronotherapy; *Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Life Style; Melatonin/metabolism; Neoplasms/etiology/*physiopathology/prevention & control/therapy; Risk Factors  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16596301 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 786  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mormont, M.-C.; Levi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Cancer chronotherapy: principles, applications, and perspectives Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Cancer Abbreviated Journal Cancer  
  Volume 97 Issue 1 Pages 155-169  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/*administration & dosage; Chronobiology Phenomena; *Chronotherapy; Colorectal Neoplasms/*drug therapy; Drug Tolerance; Humans; Models, Biological; Prognosis; Quality of Life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cell physiology is regulated along the 24-hour timescale by a circadian clock, which is comprised of interconnected molecular loops involving at least nine genes. The cellular clocks are coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a hypothalamic pacemaker that also helps the organism adjust to environmental cycles. The rest-activity rhythm is a reliable marker of the circadian system function in both rodents and humans. This circadian organization is responsible for predictable changes in the tolerability and efficacy of anticancer agents, and possibly also may be involved in tumor promotion or growth. METHODS: Expected least toxic times of chemotherapy were extrapolated from experimental models to human subjects with reference to the rest-activity cycle. The clinical relevance of the chronotherapy principle (i.e., treatment administration as a function of rhythms) has been investigated previously in randomized multicenter trials. RESULTS: In the current study, chronotherapeutic schedules were used to safely document activity of the combination of oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin against metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to establish new medicosurgical management for this disease, and were reported to result in unprecedented long-term survival. CONCLUSIONS: Chronotherapy concepts appear to offer further potential to improve current cancer treatment options as well as to optimize the development of new anticancer or supportive agents.  
  Address EPI 0118 INSERM Chronotherapeutique des cancers and Service de Cancerologie, Hopital Paul Brousse (I.C.I.G), 94800 Villejuif Cedex, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-543X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12491517 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 785  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Skene, D.J.; Arendt, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in the blind and their treatment with melatonin Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med  
  Volume 8 Issue 6 Pages 651-655  
  Keywords Human Health; Blindness/*complications; Chronotherapy; Circadian Rhythm/drug effects; Humans; Melatonin/*administration & dosage; Sleep/drug effects; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*drug therapy/*etiology; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract People who are blind, in addition to having to cope with partial or no sight, have an added handicap; the transmission of ocular light from the retina to their circadian clock is impaired. At its worse, for example in people with both eyes enucleated, this lesion results in desynchronisation of the biological clock (located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei) from the 24h day/night environment. While in a desynchronised state, symptoms akin to jet lag are experienced (e.g., daytime sleepiness, poor night sleep, reduced alertness and performance during waking). This is a lifelong condition. Daily administration of exogenous melatonin is the current treatment of choice for this so-called “non-24h sleep/wake disorder”. Melatonin has been shown to correct the underlying circadian rhythm abnormality as well as improve sleep and reduce daytime napping. The effectiveness of melatonin therapy depends upon its time of administration relative to the timing of the person's circadian clock. If practicable, assessment of an individual's circadian phase (by measurement of the endogenous melatonin rhythm in plasma, saliva or urine) is recommended prior to commencing treatment to optimise melatonin's effectiveness.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. d.skene@surrey.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17420154 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 811  
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