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Author (up) Ashfaq, M.; Khanam, S.; Khan, M.; Rasheed, F.; Hafeez, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Insect orientation to various color lights in the agricultural biomes of Faisalabad Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Pakistan Entomologist Abbreviated Journal Pak Entomol  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 49-52  
  Keywords Animals; Insects; Faisalabad; Pakistan; Diptera; Coleoptera; Lepidoptera  
  Abstract This experiment was conducted in the area of Punjab Agriculture Research Station (PARS) and Chak No.33 JB Faisalabad to evaluate the response insects to varying wavelengths of light. During experiment, lights of six different colors (blue, green, yellow, red, black and white) were tested. All lights were arranged in a line on agriculture land, close to Faisalabad Airport. Tree rows/blocks, forest nursery, fruit garden, wheat, maize and fodder crops were the main vegetative covers in the vicinity. Each selected color light was properly projected on 1 m^2

vertical screen (made of white cotton fabric) placed one meter high above the ground. All lights were kept on simultaneously for half an hour and the insects attracted on both sides of the screens were collected in tubs containing soapy water. At the end of experiment, the collection was shifted to properly labeled storage bottles for counting and identification into respective orders. The

highest number of insects was observed in container placed under black light (ultraviolet light), while the lowest in that of red light. Similarly, the common insect orders frequented among all color lights were Diptera, Coleoptera and

Lepidoptera respectively. The experimental results indicated that insects are attracted in more number on lights with short wavelengths and high frequencies and vice a versa.
 
  Address Department of Agri Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Pakistan Entomological Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1017-1827 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1477  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Costin, K.J.; Boulton, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Field Experiment on the Effect of Introduced Light Pollution on Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) in the Piedmont Region of Maryland Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Coleopterists Bulletin Abbreviated Journal The Coleopterists Bulletin  
  Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 84-86  
  Keywords Animals; insects; fireflies; Coleoptera; Lampyridae; Coleoptera Lampyridae; artificial light at night; ecology; light pollution  
  Abstract (none)  
  Address Environmental Biology Hood College 401 Rosemont Avenue Frederick, MD 21701, U.S.A.; kjc(at)hood.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher BioOne Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0010-065X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1406  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Hamilton, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electric Light Captures Type Journal Article
  Year 1889 Publication Psyche Abbreviated Journal Psyche  
  Volume 5 Issue 153 Pages 149-150  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; artificial light; Calosoma scrutator; Calosoma willcoxi; Calosoma externum; Diplochila major; Polymoechus brevipes; Erycus puncticollis; Cybister fimbirolatus; Dytiscus fasciventrus; Hydrophilus trangularis; Belostoma americanum; beetles; hemiptera; insects; coleoptera; water beetles; urban; cities  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1273  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Oliveira, A.G.; Stevani, C.V.; Waldenmaier, H.E.; Viviani, V.; Emerson, J.M.; Loros, J.J.; Dunlap, J.C. url  openurl
  Title Circadian Control Sheds Light on Fungal Bioluminescence Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Current Biology Abbreviated Journal Curr. Biol.  
  Volume 25 Issue 7 Pages R283-R285  
  Keywords Animals; bioluminescence; fungi; Agaricales; NADH; NADPH; Neonothopanus gardneri; *Circadian Clocks; luciferase; reductase; biology; luciferin; coleopterans; hemipterans; dipterans; hymenopterans; ecology  
  Abstract Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi—only 71 species, all within the ∼9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order—are reported from among ∼100,000 described fungal species. All require oxygen and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia, we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects. Prosthetic acrylic resin “mushrooms,” internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced.  
  Address Departamento de Oceanografia Física, Química, e Geológica, Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 05508-120, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1141  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Picchi, M.S.; Avolio, L.; Azzani, L.; Brombin, O.; Camerini, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fireflies and land use in an urban landscape: the case of Luciola italica L. (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) in the city of Turin Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Insect Conservation Abbreviated Journal J Insect Conserv  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 797-805  
  Keywords Turin; insects; Coleoptera Lampyridae; Luciola italica; Urban environment; Fireflies; Light pollution; Ecological corridors; Green areas; Po River; Italy  
  Abstract Research was carried out in the city of Turin (Northern Italy) in order to assess the suitability of the urban environment for fireflies.The study started in 2007 with an artistic and scientific project promoted by Parco Arte Vivente (PAV—Park of living art). Citizens joining the project recorded 18 areas where they could observe fireflies, which were identified as Luciola italica L. (Coleoptera Lampyridae). All of the 18 areas recorded by citizens were then visited during the summer of 2009 and the abundance of L. italica was estimated using transects. In 12 sites the presence of the firefly was confirmed. The habitat structures of L. italica were woods interspersed with clearings in the urban districts in the hills, and parks along rivers in the lower and more populated part of the city. In sites where fireflies were observed, the level of illuminance measured was significantly lower than in areas where L. italica was absent. The analysis of the landscape around the study areas showed a negative correlation between the extent of urbanization and fireflies abundance. Survival of L. italica populations in the urban area of Turin is influenced by the extent of green areas and the level of artificial illumination. Parks lying among rivers preserve a level of darkness suitable for fireflies and are connected by woody strips growing along the banks of rivers, that probably function as ecological corridors.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1366-638X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 108  
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