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Author Hölker, F.; Wolter, C.; Perkin, E.K.; Tockner, K.
Title Light pollution as a biodiversity threat Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol
Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 681-682
Keywords *Biodiversity; Biological Clocks; Biological Evolution; Ecosystem; *Environmental Monitoring; *Environmental Pollutants; Light/*adverse effects
Abstract (up)
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21035893 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 36
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Author Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the effects of light pollution: a review: Moth pollination and light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Ecological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Ecol Entomol
Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 187–198
Keywords Ecology; Agro-ecosystems; artificial night lighting; ecological networks; ecosystem services; flowering plants; food-webs; moths; population declines; plants; insects; pollination
Abstract (up) 1. Moths (Lepidoptera) are the major nocturnal pollinators of flowers. However, their importance and contribution to the provision of pollination ecosystem services may have been under-appreciated. Evidence was identified that moths are important pollinators of a diverse range of plant species in diverse ecosystems across the world.

2. Moth populations are known to be undergoing significant declines in several European countries. Among the potential drivers of this decline is increasing light pollution. The known and possible effects of artificial night lighting upon moths were reviewed, and suggest how artificial night lighting might in turn affect the provision of pollination by moths. The need for studies of the effects of artificial night lighting upon whole communities of moths was highlighted.

3. An ecological network approach is one valuable method to consider the effects of artificial night lighting upon the provision of pollination by moths, as it provides useful insights into ecosystem functioning and stability, and may help elucidate the indirect effects of artificial light upon communities of moths and the plants they pollinate.

4. It was concluded that nocturnal pollination is an ecosystem process that may potentially be disrupted by increasing light pollution, although the nature of this disruption remains to be tested.
Address School of Biological, Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, U.K.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-6946 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @; IDA @ john @ Serial 1084
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Author Stone, E.L.; Jones, G.; Harris, S.
Title Street lighting disturbs commuting bats Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 19 Issue 13 Pages 1123-1127
Keywords Animals; Behavior, Animal/*physiology; *Chiroptera; *Cities; Conservation of Natural Resources; Echolocation; Ecosystem; *Flight, Animal; Humans; *Light; Random Allocation; *Transportation; Vocalization, Animal
Abstract (up) Anthropogenic disturbance is a major cause of worldwide declines in biodiversity. Understanding the implications of this disturbance for species and populations is crucial for conservation biologists wishing to mitigate negative effects. Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasing global problem, affecting ecological interactions across a range of taxa and impacting negatively upon critical animal behaviors including foraging, reproduction, and communication (for review see). Almost all bats are nocturnal, making them ideal subjects for testing the effects of light pollution. Previous studies have shown that bat species adapted to foraging in open environments feed on insects attracted to mercury vapor lamps. Here, we use an experimental approach to provide the first evidence of a negative effect of artificial light pollution on the commuting behavior of a threatened bat species. We installed high-pressure sodium lights that mimic the intensity and light spectra of streetlights along commuting routes of lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros). Bat activity was reduced dramatically and the onset of commuting behavior was delayed in the presence of lighting, with no evidence of habituation. These results demonstrate that light pollution may have significant negative impacts upon the selection of flight routes by bats.
Address School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK. emma.stone@bristol.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19540116 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 100
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Author O'Connor, J.J.; Fobert, E.K.; Besson, M.; Jacob, H.; Lecchini, D.
Title Live fast, die young: Behavioural and physiological impacts of light pollution on a marine fish during larval recruitment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume 146 Issue Pages 908-914
Keywords Animals; Ecosystem; Environmental Pollution/adverse effects; Fishes/growth & development/*physiology; Larva/growth & development/physiology/*radiation effects; Light/*adverse effects; Metamorphosis, Biological/radiation effects; Predatory Behavior/radiation effects; Coral reefs; Fish larvae; Light pollution; Metamorphosis; Recruitment
Abstract (up) Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a recently acknowledged form of anthropogenic pollution of growing concern to the biology and ecology of exposed organisms. Though ALAN can have detrimental effects on physiology and behaviour, we have little understanding of how marine organisms in coastal areas may be impacted. Here, we investigated the effects of ALAN exposure on coral reef fish larvae during the critical recruitment stage, encompassing settlement, metamorphosis, and post-settlement survival. We found that larvae avoided illuminated settlement habitats, however those living under ALAN conditions for 10days post-settlement experienced changes in swimming behaviour and higher susceptibility to nocturnal predation. Although ALAN-exposed fish grew faster and heavier than control fish, they also experienced significantly higher mortality rates by the end of the experimental period. This is the first study on the ecological impacts of ALAN during the early life history of marine fish.
Address Institute for Pacific Coral Reefs, IRCP, 98729, Moorea, French Polynesia; PSL Research University: EPHE-UPVD-CNRS, USR3278 CRIOBE, BP 1013, 98729 Papetoai, Moorea, French Polynesia; Laboratoire d'Excellence “CORAIL”, Moorea, French Polynesia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31426235 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2812
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Author Pu, G.; Zeng, D.; Mo, L.; Liao, J.; Chen, X.
Title Artificial Light at Night Alleviates the Negative Effect of Pb on Freshwater Ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci
Volume 20 Issue 6 Pages
Keywords Ecology; freshwater; ecosystems; metal pollution
Abstract (up) Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing phenomenon worldwide that can cause a series of biological and ecological effects, yet little is known about its potential interaction with other stressors in aquatic ecosystems. Here, we tested whether the impact of lead (Pb) on litter decomposition was altered by ALAN exposure using an indoor microcosm experiment. The results showed that ALAN exposure alone significantly increased leaf litter decomposition, decreased the lignin content of leaf litter, and altered fungal community composition and structure. The decomposition rate was 51% higher in Pb with ALAN exposure treatments than in Pb without ALAN treatments, resulting in increased microbial biomass, beta-glucosidase (beta-G) activity, and the enhanced correlation between beta-G and litter decomposition rate. These results indicate that the negative effect of Pb on leaf litter decomposition in aquatic ecosystems may be alleviated by ALAN. In addition, ALAN exposure also alters the correlation among fungi associated with leaf litter decomposition. In summary, this study expands our understanding of Pb toxicity on litter decomposition in freshwater ecosystems and highlights the importance of considering ALAN when assessing environmental metal pollutions.
Address College of Life Science, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541006, China. chenxx7276@163.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30884876; PMCID:PMC6471329 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2334
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