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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Ruhtz, T.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F.
Title (up) Cloud coverage acts as an amplifier for ecological light pollution in urban ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 6 Issue 3 Pages e17307
Keywords Berlin; *Cities; *Ecosystem; Environmental Pollution/*adverse effects/analysis; *Light; Seasons; *Weather
Abstract The diurnal cycle of light and dark is one of the strongest environmental factors for life on Earth. Many species in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems use the level of ambient light to regulate their metabolism, growth, and behavior. The sky glow caused by artificial lighting from urban areas disrupts this natural cycle, and has been shown to impact the behavior of organisms, even many kilometers away from the light sources. It could be hypothesized that factors that increase the luminance of the sky amplify the degree of this “ecological light pollution”. We show that cloud coverage dramatically amplifies the sky luminance, by a factor of 10.1 for one location inside of Berlin and by a factor of 2.8 at 32 km from the city center. We also show that inside of the city overcast nights are brighter than clear rural moonlit nights, by a factor of 4.1. These results have important implications for choronobiological and chronoecological studies in urban areas, where this amplification effect has previously not been considered.
Address Institute for Space Sciences, Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin, Germany. christopher.kyba@wew.fu-berlin.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21399694; PMCID:PMC3047560 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 20
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Author Czarnecka, M.; Kakareko, T.; Jermacz, Ł.; Pawlak, R.; Kobak, J.
Title (up) Combined effects of nocturnal exposure to artificial light and habitat complexity on fish foraging Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment
Volume 684 Issue Pages 14-22
Keywords Animal; fishes; Perca fluviatilis; Gammarus fossarum; gammarids; aquatic ecosystems
Abstract Due to the widespread use of artificial light, freshwater ecosystems in urban areas at night are often subjected to light of intensities exceeding that of the moonlight. Nocturnal dim light could modify fish behaviour and benefit visual predators because of enhanced foraging success compared to dark nights. However, effects of nocturnal light could be mitigated by the presence of structured habitats providing refuges for prey. We tested in laboratory experiments whether nocturnal light of low intensity (2 lx) increases foraging efficiency of the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) on invertebrate prey (Gammarus fossarum). The tests were conducted at dusk and night under two light regimes: natural cycle with dark nights and disturbed cycle with artificially illuminated nights, in habitats differing in structural complexity: sand and woody debris. We found that nocturnal illumination significantly enhanced the consumption of gammarids by fish compared to dark nights. In addition, the perch was as effective predator in illuminated nights (2 lx) as at dusk (10 lx). Woody debris provided an effective refuge only in combination with undisturbed darkness, but not in illuminated nights. Our results suggest that nocturnal illumination in aquatic ecosystems may contribute to significant reductions in invertebrate population sizes through fish predation. The loss of darkness reduces the possibility of using shelters by invertebrates and hence the effects of elevated light levels at night could not be mitigated by an increased habitat complexity.
Address Department of Ecology and Biogeography, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, Poland; mczarn(at)umk.pl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor English Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2507
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Author Johnsen, S.; Kelber, A.; Warrant, E.; Sweeney, A.M.; Widder, E.A.; Lee, R.L.J.; Hernandez-Andres, J.
Title (up) Crepuscular and nocturnal illumination and its effects on color perception by the nocturnal hawkmoth Deilephila elpenor Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication The Journal of Experimental Biology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Biol
Volume 209 Issue Pt 5 Pages 789-800
Keywords Animals; Color Perception/*physiology; Ecosystem; *Light; Moths/*physiology
Abstract Recent studies have shown that certain nocturnal insect and vertebrate species have true color vision under nocturnal illumination. Thus, their vision is potentially affected by changes in the spectral quality of twilight and nocturnal illumination, due to the presence or absence of the moon, artificial light pollution and other factors. We investigated this in the following manner. First we measured the spectral irradiance (from 300 to 700 nm) during the day, sunset, twilight, full moon, new moon, and in the presence of high levels of light pollution. The spectra were then converted to both human-based chromaticities and to relative quantum catches for the nocturnal hawkmoth Deilephila elpenor, which has color vision. The reflectance spectra of various flowers and leaves and the red hindwings of D. elpenor were also converted to chromaticities and relative quantum catches. Finally, the achromatic and chromatic contrasts (with and without von Kries color constancy) of the flowers and hindwings against a leaf background were determined under the various lighting environments. The twilight and nocturnal illuminants were substantially different from each other, resulting in significantly different contrasts. The addition of von Kries color constancy significantly reduced the effect of changing illuminants on chromatic contrast, suggesting that, even in this light-limited environment, the ability of color vision to provide reliable signals under changing illuminants may offset the concurrent threefold decrease in sensitivity and spatial resolution. Given this, color vision may be more common in crepuscular and nocturnal species than previously considered.
Address Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA. sjohnsen@duke.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16481568 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 604
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Author Gerrish, G.A.; Morin, J.G.; Rivers, T.J.; Patrawala, Z.
Title (up) Darkness as an ecological resource: the role of light in partitioning the nocturnal niche Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia
Volume 160 Issue 3 Pages 525-536
Keywords Age Factors; Animals; Belize; Crustacea/*physiology; *Darkness; *Ecosystem; Feeding Behavior/physiology; Linear Models; Motor Activity/*physiology; Photoperiod; Sexual Behavior, Animal/physiology; Water Movements
Abstract Nocturnal behaviors that vary as a function of light intensity, either from the setting sun or the moon, are typically labeled as circadian or circalunar. Both of these terms refer to endogenous time-dependent behaviors. In contrast, the nightly reproductive and feeding behaviors of Vargula annecohenae, a bioluminescent ostracod (Arthropoda: Crustacea) fluctuate in response to light intensity, an exogenous factor that is not strictly time-dependent. We measured adult and juvenile activity of V. annecohenae throughout lunar cycles in January/February and June 2003. Overnight and nightly measurements of foraging and reproductive behavior of adult V. annecohenae indicated that activity was greatest when a critical “dark threshold” was reached and that the dark threshold for adult V. annecohenae is met when less than a third of the moon is visible or at the intensity of light 2-3 min before the start of nautical twilight when no moon is illuminated. Juvenile V. annecohenae were also nocturnally active but demonstrated little or no response to lunar illumination, remaining active even during brightly moonlit periods. In addition to light level, water velocity also influenced the behaviors of V. annecohenae, with fewer juveniles and adults actively foraging on nights when water velocity was high (>25 cm/s). Our data demonstrate that the strongest environmental factor influencing adult feeding and reproductive behaviors of V. annecohenae is the availability of time when illumination is below the critical dark threshold. This dependence on darkness for successful growth and reproduction allows us to classify darkness as a resource, in the same way that the term has been applied to time, space and temperature.
Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA. ggerrish@nd.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19330516 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 16
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Author Pu, G.; Zen, D.; Mo, L.; He, W.; Zhou, L.; Huang, K.; Liao, J.; Qiu, S.; Chai, S.
Title (up) Does artificial light at night change the impact of silver nanoparticles on microbial decomposers and leaf litter decomposition in streams? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Science: Nano Abbreviated Journal Environ. Sci.: Nano
Volume 6 Issue Pages 1728-1739
Keywords Ecology; silver nanoparticles; aquatic ecosystems
Abstract The toxic effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) to aquatic species and ecosystem processes have been the focus of increasing research in ecology, but their effects under different environmental stressors, such as the ongoing anthropogenic artificial light at night (ALAN) which can cause a series of ecological effects and will potentially interact with other stressors, remain poorly understood. Here, we aimed to assess the combined effects of AgNP and ALAN on the activities and community structure of fungi and bacteria associated to plant litter in a stream. The results showed that ALAN not only led to changes in the average hydrodynamic diameter, ζ-potential and dissolved concentration of AgNP but also inhibited the enzyme activities of leucine-aminopeptidase (LAP), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (PER) associated to microbes involved in litter decomposition. The negative effect of AgNP on the decomposition of Pterocarya stenoptera leaf litter was alleviated by ALAN owing to the reduction of Ag+ concentration in the microcosm and lignin content in the leaf litter in the A-AgNP treatments, the enhancement of β-glucosidase (β-G) activities and the increase of microbial biomass. The effect of ALAN alone or combined with AgNP or AgNO3 on the taxonomic composition of fungi was much greater than that on bacteria. Linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) demonstrated that each treatment had its own fungal and bacterial indicator taxa, from the phylum to genus levels, indicating that the microbial communities associated with litter decomposition can change their constituent taxa to cope with different stressors. These results reveal that ALAN can decrease the toxicity of AgNP and highlight the importance of considering ALAN during the assessment of the risk posed by nanoparticles to freshwater biota and ecosystem processes.
Address Guangxi Key Laboratory of Plant Conservation and Restoration Ecology in Karst Terrain, Guangxi Institute of Botany, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guilin, China; pukouchy(at)hotmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Astronomical Society of Chemistry Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2051-8153 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2332
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