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Author Nordt, A.; Klenke, R.
Title Sleepless in town--drivers of the temporal shift in dawn song in urban European blackbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume (down) 8 Issue 8 Pages e71476
Keywords Animals; Automobiles; Cities; Ecosystem; Germany; Humans; Light; Male; Noise; Photoperiod; Sleep; Songbirds/*physiology; Urban Population; *Vocalization, Animal; dawn chorus; morning chorus
Abstract Organisms living in urban environments are exposed to different environmental conditions compared to their rural conspecifics. Especially anthropogenic noise and artificial night light are closely linked to urbanization and pose new challenges to urban species. Songbirds are particularly affected by these factors, because they rely on the spread of acoustic information and adjust their behaviour to the rhythm of night and day, e.g. time their dawn song according to changing light intensities. Our aim was to clarify the specific contributions of artificial night light and traffic noise on the timing of dawn song of urban European Blackbirds (Turdus merula). We investigated the onset of blackbird dawn song along a steep urban gradient ranging from an urban forest to the city centre of Leipzig, Germany. This gradient of anthropogenic noise and artificial night light was reflected in the timing of dawn song. In the city centre, blackbirds started their dawn song up to 5 hours earlier compared to those in semi-natural habitats. We found traffic noise to be the driving factor of the shift of dawn song into true night, although it was not completely separable from the effects of ambient night light. We additionally included meteorological conditions into the analysis and found an effect on the song onset. Cloudy and cold weather delayed the onset, but cloud cover was assumed to reflect night light emissions, thus, amplified sky luminance and increased the effect of artificial night light. Beside these temporal effects, we also found differences in the spatial autocorrelation of dawn song onset showing a much higher variability in noisy city areas than in rural parks and forests. These findings indicate that urban hazards such as ambient noise and light pollution show a manifold interference with naturally evolved cycles and have significant effects on the activity patterns of urban blackbirds.
Address Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Conservation Biology, Leipzig, Germany. anja.nordt@ufz.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23940759; PMCID:PMC3737108 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 43
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Author Holzhauer S.I.J.; Franke S.; Kyba C.C.M.; Manfrin A.; Klenke R.; Voigt C.C.; Lewanzik D.; Oehlert M.; Monaghan M.T.; Schneider S.; Heller S.; Kuechly H.; Brüning A.; Honnen A.-C.; Hölker F.
Title Out of the Dark: Establishing a Large-Scale Field Experiment to Assess the Effects of Artificial Light at Night on Species and Food Webs Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 7 Issue 11 Pages 15593-15616
Keywords ALAN; artificial light at night; ecosystems; freshwater; light pollution; loss of the night; photometric characterization; riparian; Verlust der Nacht
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is one of the most obvious hallmarks of human presence in an ecosystem. The rapidly increasing use of artificial light has fundamentally transformed nightscapes throughout most of the globe, although little is known about how ALAN impacts the biodiversity and food webs of illuminated ecosystems. We developed a large-scale experimental infrastructure to study the effects of ALAN on a light-naïve, natural riparian (i.e., terrestrial-aquatic) ecosystem. Twelve street lights (20 m apart) arranged in three rows parallel to an agricultural drainage ditch were installed on each of two sites located in a grassland ecosystem in northern Germany. A range of biotic, abiotic, and photometric data are collected regularly to study the short- and long-term effects of ALAN on behavior, species interactions, physiology, and species composition of communities. Here we describe the infrastructure setup and data collection methods, and characterize the study area including photometric measurements. None of the measured parameters differed significantly between sites in the period before illumination. Results of one short-term experiment, carried out with one site illuminated and the other acting as a control, demonstrate the attraction of ALAN by the immense and immediate increase of insect catches at the lit street lights. The experimental setup provides a unique platform for carrying out interdisciplinary research on sustainable lighting.
Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Müggelseedamm 301/310, 12587 Berlin, Germany; holzhauer(at)igb-berlin.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1305
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Ruhtz, T.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F.
Title Cloud coverage acts as an amplifier for ecological light pollution in urban ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume (down) 6 Issue 3 Pages e17307
Keywords Berlin; *Cities; *Ecosystem; Environmental Pollution/*adverse effects/analysis; *Light; Seasons; *Weather
Abstract The diurnal cycle of light and dark is one of the strongest environmental factors for life on Earth. Many species in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems use the level of ambient light to regulate their metabolism, growth, and behavior. The sky glow caused by artificial lighting from urban areas disrupts this natural cycle, and has been shown to impact the behavior of organisms, even many kilometers away from the light sources. It could be hypothesized that factors that increase the luminance of the sky amplify the degree of this “ecological light pollution”. We show that cloud coverage dramatically amplifies the sky luminance, by a factor of 10.1 for one location inside of Berlin and by a factor of 2.8 at 32 km from the city center. We also show that inside of the city overcast nights are brighter than clear rural moonlit nights, by a factor of 4.1. These results have important implications for choronobiological and chronoecological studies in urban areas, where this amplification effect has previously not been considered.
Address Institute for Space Sciences, Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin, Germany. christopher.kyba@wew.fu-berlin.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21399694; PMCID:PMC3047560 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 20
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Author Pu, G.; Zen, D.; Mo, L.; He, W.; Zhou, L.; Huang, K.; Liao, J.; Qiu, S.; Chai, S.
Title Does artificial light at night change the impact of silver nanoparticles on microbial decomposers and leaf litter decomposition in streams? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Science: Nano Abbreviated Journal Environ. Sci.: Nano
Volume (down) 6 Issue Pages 1728-1739
Keywords Ecology; silver nanoparticles; aquatic ecosystems
Abstract The toxic effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) to aquatic species and ecosystem processes have been the focus of increasing research in ecology, but their effects under different environmental stressors, such as the ongoing anthropogenic artificial light at night (ALAN) which can cause a series of ecological effects and will potentially interact with other stressors, remain poorly understood. Here, we aimed to assess the combined effects of AgNP and ALAN on the activities and community structure of fungi and bacteria associated to plant litter in a stream. The results showed that ALAN not only led to changes in the average hydrodynamic diameter, ζ-potential and dissolved concentration of AgNP but also inhibited the enzyme activities of leucine-aminopeptidase (LAP), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (PER) associated to microbes involved in litter decomposition. The negative effect of AgNP on the decomposition of Pterocarya stenoptera leaf litter was alleviated by ALAN owing to the reduction of Ag+ concentration in the microcosm and lignin content in the leaf litter in the A-AgNP treatments, the enhancement of β-glucosidase (β-G) activities and the increase of microbial biomass. The effect of ALAN alone or combined with AgNP or AgNO3 on the taxonomic composition of fungi was much greater than that on bacteria. Linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) demonstrated that each treatment had its own fungal and bacterial indicator taxa, from the phylum to genus levels, indicating that the microbial communities associated with litter decomposition can change their constituent taxa to cope with different stressors. These results reveal that ALAN can decrease the toxicity of AgNP and highlight the importance of considering ALAN during the assessment of the risk posed by nanoparticles to freshwater biota and ecosystem processes.
Address Guangxi Key Laboratory of Plant Conservation and Restoration Ecology in Karst Terrain, Guangxi Institute of Botany, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guilin, China; pukouchy(at)hotmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Astronomical Society of Chemistry Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2051-8153 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2332
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Author Lyytimäki, J.
Title Nature's nocturnal services: Light pollution as a non-recognised challenge for ecosystem services research and management Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Ecosystem Services Abbreviated Journal Ecosystem Services
Volume (down) 3 Issue Pages e44-e48
Keywords Economics; Ecosystem disservices; Ecosystem services; Environmental management; Light pollution; Scotoecology; Shifting baselines
Abstract Research focusing on ecosystem services has tackled several of the major drivers of environmental degradation, but it suffers from a blind spot related to light pollution. Light pollution caused by artificial night-time lighting is a global environmental change affecting terrestrial, coastal and marine ecosystems. The long-term effects of the disruption of the natural cycles of light and dark on ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services are largely unknown. Even though additional research is clearly needed, identifying, developing and implementing stringent management actions aimed at reducing inadequately installed, unnecessary or excessive lighting are well justified. This essay argues that management is hampered, because ecosystem services from nocturnal nature are increasingly underappreciated by the public due to shifting baseline syndrome, making most people accustomed to constantly illuminated and light-polluted night environments. Increased attention from scientists, managers and the public is needed in order to explicate the best options for preserving the benefits from natural darkness.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2212-0416 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 433
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