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Author (down) Menegaux, F.; Truong, T.; Anger, A.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Lamkarkach, F.; Arveux, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Fevotte, J.; Guenel, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night work and breast cancer: a population-based case-control study in France (the CECILE study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 924-931  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Employment; Female; France/epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Occupations; Pregnancy; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract Night work involving disruption of circadian rhythm was suggested as a possible cause of breast cancer. We examined the role of night work in a large population-based case-control study carried out in France between 2005 and 2008. Lifetime occupational history including work schedules of each night work period was elicited in 1,232 cases of breast cancer and 1,317 population controls. Thirteen percent of the cases and 11% of the controls had ever worked on night shifts (OR = 1.27 [95% confidence interval = 0.99-1.64]). Odds ratios were 1.35 [1.01-1.80] in women who worked on overnight shifts, 1.40 [1.01-1.92] in women who had worked at night for 4.5 or more years, and 1.43 [1.01-2.03] in those who worked less than three nights per week on average. The odds ratio was 1.95 [1.13-3.35] in women employed in night work for >4 years before their first full-term pregnancy, a period where mammary gland cells are incompletely differentiated and possibly more susceptible to circadian disruption effects. Our results support the hypothesis that night work plays a role in breast cancer, particularly in women who started working at night before first full-term pregnancy.  
  Address Inserm, CESP Center for research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France; Univ Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22689255 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 781  
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Author (down) Martinez-Nicolas, A.; Ortiz-Tudela, E.; Madrid, J.A.; Rol, M.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Crosstalk between environmental light and internal time in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 28 Issue 7 Pages 617-629  
  Keywords Adolescent; Biological Clocks/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cues; *Environment; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Sleep; Spain; Temperature; *Time; Young Adult  
  Abstract Daily exposure to environmental light is the most important zeitgeber in humans, and all studied characteristics of light pattern (timing, intensity, rate of change, duration, and spectrum) influence the circadian system. However, and due to lack of current studies on environmental light exposure and its influence on the circadian system, the aim of this work is to determine the characteristics of a naturalistic regimen of light exposure and its relationship with the functioning of the human circadian system. Eighty-eight undergraduate students (18-23 yrs) were recruited in Murcia, Spain (latitude 38 degrees 01'N) to record wrist temperature (WT), light exposure, and sleep for 1 wk under free-living conditions. Light-exposure timing, rate of change, regularity, intensity, and contrast were calculated, and their effects on the sleep pattern and WT rhythm were then analyzed. In general, higher values for interdaily stability, relative amplitude, mean morning light, and light quality index (LQI) correlated with higher interdaily stability and relative amplitude, and phase advance in sleep plus greater stability in WT and phase advance of the WT circadian rhythm. On the other hand, a higher fragmentation of the light-exposure rhythm was associated with more fragmented sleep. Naturalistic studies using 24-h ambulatory light monitoring provide essential information about the main circadian system input, necessary for maintaining healthy circadian tuning. Correcting light-exposure patterns accordingly may help prevent or even reverse health problems associated with circadian disruption.  
  Address Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Physiology, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21793693 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 302  
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Author (down) Lowden, A.; Akerstedt, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of a new dynamic light regimen in a nuclear power control room without windows on quickly rotating shiftworkers--effects on health, wakefulness, and circadian alignment: a pilot study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 641-649  
  Keywords Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; Darkness/adverse effects; *Environment, Controlled; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Middle Aged; Photic Stimulation; Pilot Projects; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/*physiology; *Wakefulness; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract The aim of the study was to test whether a new dynamic light regime would improve alertness, sleep, and adaptation to rotating shiftwork. The illumination level in a control room without windows at a nuclear power station was ~200 lux (straight-forward horizontal gaze) using a weak yellow light of 200 lux, 3000 K (Philips Master TLD 36 W 830). New lighting equipment was installed in one area of the control room above the positions of the reactor operators. The new lights were shielded from the control group by a distance of >6 m, and the other operators worked at desks turned away from the new light. The new lights were designed to give three different light exposures: (i) white/blue strong light of 745 lux, 6000 K; (ii) weak yellow light of 650 lux, 4000 K; and (iii) yellow moderate light of 700 lux, 4000 K. In a crossover design, the normal and new light exposures were given during a sequence of three night shifts, two free days, two morning shifts, and one afternoon shift (NNN + MMA), with 7 wks between sessions. The operators consisted of two groups; seven reactor operators from seven work teams were at one time exposed to the new equipment and 16 other operators were used as controls. The study was conducted during winter with reduced opportunities of daylight exposure during work, after night work, or before morning work. Operators wore actigraphs, filled in a sleep/wake diary, including ratings of sleepiness on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) every 2 h, and provided saliva samples for analysis of melatonin at work (every 2nd h during one night shift and first 3 h during one morning shift). Results from the wake/sleep diary showed the new light treatment increased alertness during the 2nd night shift (interaction group x light x time, p < .01). Time of waking was delayed in the light condition after the 3rd night shift (group x light, p < .05), but the amount of wake time during the sleep span increased after the 2nd night shift (p < .05), also showing a tendency to affect sleep efficiency (p < .10). Effects on circadian phase were difficult to establish given the small sample size and infrequent sampling of saliva melatonin. Nonetheless, it seems that appropriate dynamic light in rooms without windows during the dark Nordic season may promote alertness, sleep, and better adaptation to quickly rotating shiftwork.  
  Address Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. arne.lowden@stress.su.se  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22621361 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 148  
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Author (down) Longcore, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sensory ecology: night lights alter reproductive behavior of blue tits Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 20 Issue 20 Pages R893-5  
  Keywords Animals; Austria; *Cities; Female; *Light; Male; Oviposition/*physiology; Passeriformes/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Vocalization, Animal/*physiology  
  Abstract Research on songbirds indicates that streetlights influence timing of dawn chorus, egg-laying and male success in siring extra-pair young, providing new evidence that artificial lighting is an ecologically disruptive force.  
  Address The Urban Wildlands Group, Los Angeles, CA 90024-0020, USA. longcore@urbanwildlands.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20971434 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 699  
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Author (down) Lockley, S.W.; Brainard, G.C.; Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High sensitivity of the human circadian melatonin rhythm to resetting by short wavelength light Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 88 Issue 9 Pages 4502-4505  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Area Under Curve; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/*metabolism; Pineal Gland/metabolism/radiation effects; Saliva/metabolism; Non-programmatic  
  Abstract The endogenous circadian oscillator in mammals, situated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, receives environmental photic input from specialized subsets of photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells. The human circadian pacemaker is exquisitely sensitive to ocular light exposure, even in some people who are otherwise totally blind. The magnitude of the resetting response to white light depends on the timing, intensity, duration, number and pattern of exposures. We report here that the circadian resetting response in humans, as measured by the pineal melatonin rhythm, is also wavelength dependent. Exposure to 6.5 h of monochromatic light at 460 nm induces a two-fold greater circadian phase delay than 6.5 h of 555 nm monochromatic light of equal photon density. Similarly, 460 nm monochromatic light causes twice the amount of melatonin suppression compared to 555 nm monochromatic light, and is dependent on the duration of exposure in addition to wavelength. These studies demonstrate that the peak of sensitivity of the human circadian pacemaker to light is blue-shifted relative to the three-cone visual photopic system, the sensitivity of which peaks at approximately 555 nm. Thus photopic lux, the standard unit of illuminance, is inappropriate when quantifying the photic drive required to reset the human circadian pacemaker.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12970330 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 778  
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