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Author (down) Li, Q.; Zheng, T.; Holford, T.R.; Boyle, P.; Zhang, Y.; Dai, M.
Title Light at night and breast cancer risk: results from a population-based case-control study in Connecticut, USA Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control
Volume 21 Issue 12 Pages 2281-2285
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Carcinoma/epidemiology/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Connecticut/epidemiology; Female; Humans; *Light/adverse effects; Middle Aged; Population; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; United States/epidemiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/physiology; Oncogenesis
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential association between domestic exposure to light at night (LAN) and the risk of human breast cancer. METHODS: A case-control study of female breast cancer was conducted in Connecticut. A total of 363 incident breast cancer cases and 356 age frequency-matched controls were interviewed using a standardized, structured questionnaire to obtain information on sleeping patterns and bedroom light environment. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: A non-significantly increased risk of breast cancer was observed among postmenopausal women for those keeping lights on while sleeping (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 0.7, 2.7), those who reported mainly sleeping in the daytime (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 0.5, 4.3), and those not drawing the curtains/window shades while sleeping at night (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.8, 1.9). CONCLUSION: The results from this study suggest a potential increased risk of breast cancer associated with domestic exposure to LAN. Further studies with larger sample size are needed to confirm the results.
Address Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20927578; PMCID:PMC3154700 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 161
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Author (down) Landers, J.A.; Tamblyn, D.; Perriam, D.
Title Effect of a blue-light-blocking intraocular lens on the quality of sleep Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Cataract Refract Surg
Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 83-88
Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Female; Humans; *Lens Implantation, Intraocular; *Lenses, Intraocular; Light; Male; *Phacoemulsification; Prosthesis Design; Questionnaires; Sleep/*physiology; blue light; sleep
Abstract PURPOSE: To evaluate whether implantation of a blue-light-blocking intraocular lens (IOL) affects sleep quality. SETTING: Repatriation General Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. METHODS: This study comprised patients who had bilateral cataract surgery during the preceding 12 months with implantation of a conventional SI40NB IOL or an AcrySof Natural SN60WF blue-light-blocking IOL. Patients were contacted by telephone at least 6 months after second-eye surgery, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire was administered. Results were compared between groups. RESULTS: Of the 49 patients, 31 received conventional IOLs and 18, blue-light-blocking IOLs. The mean age of the patients was 80 years +/- 8.1 (SD). The median PSQI score was 6 (interquartile range 3 to 8). There were no statistically significant differences in PSQI scores between the 2 IOL groups (P = .65). This remained true after adjustment for sex, age, medication, and time since surgery. CONCLUSION: The blue-light-blocking IOL had no effect on the sleep quality of patients, indicating that these IOLs might serve as an alternative to conventional IOLs without a detrimental effect on circadian rhythm.
Address Department of Ophthalmology, Repatriation General Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. john.landers@bigpond.com
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0886-3350 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19101429 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 288
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Author (down) Knutsson, A.; Alfredsson, L.; Karlsson, B.; Akerstedt, T.; Fransson, E.I.; Westerholm, P.; Westerlund, H.
Title Breast cancer among shift workers: results of the WOLF longitudinal cohort study Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Work Environ Health
Volume 39 Issue 2 Pages 170-177
Keywords Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment; Sweden/epidemiology; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether shift work (with or without night work) is associated with increased risk of breast cancer. METHODS: The population consisted of 4036 women. Data were obtained from WOLF (Work, Lipids, and Fibrinogen), a longitudinal cohort study. Information about baseline characteristics was based on questionnaire responses and medical examination. Cancer incidence from baseline to follow-up was obtained from the national cancer registry. Two exposure groups were identified: shift work with and without night work. The group with day work only was used as the reference group in the analysis. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate relative risk. RESULTS: In total, 94 women developed breast cancer during follow-up. The average follow-up time was 12.4 years. The hazard ratio for breast cancer was 1.23 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.70-2.17] for shifts without night work and 2.02 (95% CI 1.03-3.95) for shifts with night work. When including only women <60 years of age, the risk estimates were 1.18 (95% CI 0.67-2.07) for shifts without night work, and 2.15 (95% CI 1.10-4.21) for shifts with night work. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate an increased risk for breast cancer among women who work shifts that includes night work.
Address Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall. Sweden. Anders.Knutsson@miun.se
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0355-3140 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23007867 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 154
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Author (down) Kloog, I.; Stevens, R.G.; Haim, A.; Portnov, B.A.
Title Nighttime light level co-distributes with breast cancer incidence worldwide Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control
Volume 21 Issue 12 Pages 2059-2068
Keywords Adult; Birth Rate; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Carcinoma/*epidemiology/etiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cohort Studies; Electricity; Female; Humans; Incidence; *Light/adverse effects; Lighting; Photoperiod; Registries; Urban Population/statistics & numerical data; World Health; oncogenesis
Abstract Breast cancer incidence varies widely among countries of the world for largely unknown reasons. We investigated whether country-level light at night (LAN) is associated with incidence. We compared incidence rates of five common cancers in women (breast, lung, colorectal, larynx, and liver), observed in 164 countries of the world from the GLOBOCAN database, with population-weighted country-level LAN, and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including fertility rate, per capita income, percent of urban population, and electricity consumption. Two types of regression models were used in the analysis: Ordinary Least Squares and Spatial Errors. We found a significant positive association between population LAN level and incidence rates of breast cancer. There was no such an association between LAN level and colorectal, larynx, liver, and lung cancers. A sensitivity test, holding other variables at their average values, yielded a 30-50% higher risk of breast cancer in the highest LAN exposed countries compared to the lowest LAN exposed countries. The possibility that under-reporting from the registries in the low-resource, and also low-LAN, countries created a spurious association was evaluated in several ways and shown not to account for the results. These findings provide coherence of the previously reported case-control and cohort studies with the co-distribution of LAN and breast cancer in entire populations.
Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, University of Haifa, 31905 Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20680434 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 160
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Author (down) Kloog, I.; Portnov, B.A.; Rennert, H.S.; Haim, A.
Title Does the modern urbanized sleeping habitat pose a breast cancer risk? Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 76-80
Keywords Human Health; ged; Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Middle Aged; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; *Sleep; Urbanization
Abstract Due to its disruptive effects on circadian rhythms and sleep deprivation at night, shiftworking is currently recognized as a risk factor for breast cancer (BC). As revealed by the present analysis based on a comparative case-control study of 1679 women, exposure to light-at-night (LAN) in the “sleeping habitat” is significantly associated with BC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.118-1.311; p < .001), controlling for education, ethnicity, fertility, and alcohol consumption. The novelty of the present research is that, to the best of the authors' knowledge, it is the first study to have identified an unequivocal positive association between bedroom-light intensity and BC risk. Thus, according to the results of the present study, not only should artificial light exposure in the working environment be considered as a potential risk factor for BC, but also LAN in the “sleeping habitat.”
Address Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Graduate School of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21182407 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 770
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