|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Longcore, T.
Title Sensory ecology: night lights alter reproductive behavior of blue tits Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 20 Issue 20 Pages R893-5
Keywords Animals; Austria; *Cities; Female; *Light; Male; Oviposition/*physiology; Passeriformes/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Vocalization, Animal/*physiology
Abstract Research on songbirds indicates that streetlights influence timing of dawn chorus, egg-laying and male success in siring extra-pair young, providing new evidence that artificial lighting is an ecologically disruptive force.
Address The Urban Wildlands Group, Los Angeles, CA 90024-0020, USA. longcore@urbanwildlands.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20971434 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 699
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Foster, R.G.; Roenneberg, T.
Title Human responses to the geophysical daily, annual and lunar cycles Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 18 Issue 17 Pages R784-R794
Keywords Human Health; Biological Clocks; Birth Rate; Circadian Rhythm; Death; Female; Human Activities; Humans; Male; Moon; *Periodicity; Photoperiod; Seasons; Sexual Behavior; Sleep
Abstract Collectively the daily, seasonal, lunar and tidal geophysical cycles regulate much of the temporal biology of life on Earth. The increasing isolation of human societies from these geophysical cycles, as a result of improved living conditions, high-quality nutrition and 24/7 working practices, have led many to believe that human biology functions independently of them. Yet recent studies have highlighted the dominant role that our circadian clock plays in the organisation of 24 hour patterns of behaviour and physiology. Preferred wake and sleep times are to a large extent driven by an endogenous temporal program that uses sunlight as an entraining cue. The alarm clock can drive human activity rhythms but has little direct effect on our endogenous 24 hour physiology. In many situations, our biology and our society appear to be in serious opposition, and the damaging consequences to our health under these circumstances are increasingly recognised. The seasons dominate the lives of non-equatorial species, and until recently, they also had a marked influence on much of human biology. Despite human isolation from seasonal changes in temperature, food and photoperiod in the industrialised nations, the seasons still appear to have a small, but significant, impact upon when individuals are born and many aspects of health. The seasonal changes that modulate our biology, and how these factors might interact with the social and metabolic status of the individual to drive seasonal effects, are still poorly understood. Lunar cycles had, and continue to have, an influence upon human culture, though despite a persistent belief that our mental health and other behaviours are modulated by the phase of the moon, there is no solid evidence that human biology is in any way regulated by the lunar cycle.
Address Circadian and Visual Neuroscience, Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology, University of Oxford, Levels 5 & 6 West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK. russell.foster@eye.ox.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:18786384 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 752
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mottram, V.; Middleton, B.; Williams, P.; Arendt, J.
Title The impact of bright artificial white and 'blue-enriched' light on sleep and circadian phase during the polar winter Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Sleep Research Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Res
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pt 2 Pages 154-161
Keywords Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; *Cold Climate; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Medical Records; Questionnaires; Sleep/*physiology; Time Factors; blue light
Abstract Delayed sleep phase (and sometimes free-run) is common in the Antarctic winter (no natural sunlight) and optimizing the artificial light conditions is desirable. This project evaluated sleep when using 17,000 K blue-enriched lamps compared with standard white lamps (5000 K) for personal and communal illumination. Base personnel, 10 males, five females, 32.5+/-8 years took part in the study. From 24 March to 21 September 2006 light exposure alternated between 4-5-week periods of standard white (5000 K) and blue-enriched lamps (17,000 K), with a 3-week control before and after extra light. Sleep and light exposure were assessed by actigraphy and sleep diaries. General health (RAND 36-item questionnaire) and circadian phase (urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythm) were evaluated at the end of each light condition. Direct comparison (rmanova) of blue-enriched light with white light showed that sleep onset was earlier by 19 min (P=0.022), and sleep latency tended to be shorter by 4 min (P=0.065) with blue-enriched light. Analysing all light conditions, control, blue and white, again provided evidence for greater efficiency of blue-enriched light compared with white (P<0.05), but with the best sleep timing, duration, efficiency and quality in control natural light conditions. Circadian phase was earlier on average in midwinter blue compared with midwinter white light by 45 min (P<0.05). Light condition had no influence on general health. We conclude that the use of blue-enriched light had some beneficial effects, notably earlier sleep, compared with standard white light during the polar winter.
Address British Antarctic Survey Medical Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0962-1105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20723022 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 348
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Peplonska, B.; Bukowska, A.; Sobala, W.; Reszka, E.; Gromadzinska, J.; Wasowicz, W.; Lie, J.A.; Kjuus, H.; Ursin, G.
Title Rotating night shift work and mammographic density Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume 21 Issue 7 Pages 1028-1037
Keywords Adult; Breast/*pathology; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology/*pathology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Melatonin/urine; Middle Aged; *Midwifery; *Nursing Staff; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis
Abstract BACKGROUND: An increased risk of breast cancer has been observed in night shift workers. Exposure to artificial light at night and disruption of the endogenous circadian rhythm with suppression of the melatonin synthesis have been suggested mechanisms. We investigated the hypothesis that rotating night shift work is associated with mammographic density. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study on the association between rotating night shift work characteristics, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (MT6s) creatinine adjusted in a spot morning urine sample, and a computer-assisted measure of mammographic density in 640 nurses and midwives ages 40 to 60 years. The associations were evaluated using regression models adjusted for age, body mass index, menopausal status, age at menopause, age at menarche, smoking, and the calendar season of the year when mammography was conducted. RESULTS: The adjusted means of percentage of mammographic density and absolute density were slightly higher among women working rotating night shifts but not statistically significant [percentage of mammographic density = 23.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 21.9%-25.4% vs. 22.5%, 95% CI, 20.8%-24.3%; absolute density = 23.9 cm(2), 95% CI, 21.4-26.4 cm(2) vs. 21.8 cm(2), 95% CI, 19.4-24.3 cm(2) in rotating night shift and day shift nurses, respectively). There were no significant associations between the current or cumulative rotating night shift work exposure metrics and mammographic density. No association was observed between morning MT6s and mammographic density. CONCLUSIONS: The hypothesis on the link between rotating night shift work, melatonin synthesis disruption, and mammographic density is not supported by the results of the present study. IMPACT: It is unlikely that the development of breast cancer in nurses working rotating night shifts is mediated by an increase in mammographic density.
Address Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland. beatap@imp.lodz.pl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 1055-9965 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22539602 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 159
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hansen, J.; Lassen, C.F.
Title Nested case-control study of night shift work and breast cancer risk among women in the Danish military Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Occup Environ Med
Volume 69 Issue 8 Pages 551-556
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Denmark/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Middle Aged; Military Personnel; *Occupations; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; *Sunlight; *Work; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis
Abstract OBJECTIVES: Growing but limited evidence suggests that night shift work is associated with breast cancer. The authors conducted a nationwide case-control study nested within a cohort of 18,551 female military employees born in 1929-1968 to investigate the risk for breast cancer after night shift work and to explore the role of leisure time sun exposure and diurnal preference. METHODS: The authors documented 218 cases of breast cancer (1990-2003) and selected 899 age-matched controls from the cohort by incidence density sampling. Information on shift work, sun exposure habits, diurnal preference and other potential confounders was obtained from a structured questionnaire. ORs were estimated by multivariate conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, the authors observed an adjusted OR of 1.4 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.1) among women with ever compared with never night shifts. The RR for breast cancer tended to increase with increasing number of years of night shift work (p=0.03) and with cumulative number of shifts (p=0.02),with a neutral risk for fewer than three night shifts per week. The OR for the group with the highest tertile of cumulative exposure was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.6). The most pronounced effect of night shift work on breast cancer risk was observed in women with morning chronotype preference and intense night shifts (OR=3.9, 95% CI 1.6 to 9.5). Night shift workers tended to sunbathe more frequently than day workers. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that frequent night shift work increases the risk for breast cancer and suggest a higher risk with longer duration of intense night shifts. Women with morning preference who worked on night shifts tended to have a higher risk than those with evening preference.
Address Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, Copenhagen DK2100, Denmark. johnni@cancer.dk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 1351-0711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22645325 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 156
Permanent link to this record