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Author Sasseville, A.; Benhaberou-Brun, D.; Fontaine, C.; Charon, M.-C.; Hebert, M.
Title Wearing blue-blockers in the morning could improve sleep of workers on a permanent night schedule: a pilot study Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 26 Issue (up) 5 Pages 913-925
Keywords Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; Biological Clocks; Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Middle Aged; Photoperiod; Pilot Projects; Seasons; *Sleep; Wakefulness; *Work Schedule Tolerance; shift work; blue light; blue blocker; light therapy
Abstract Night shiftworkers often complain of disturbed sleep during the day. This could be partly caused by morning sunlight exposure during the commute home, which tends to maintain the circadian clock on a daytime rhythm. The circadian clock is most sensitive to the blue portion of the visible spectrum, so our aim was to determine if blocking short wavelengths of light below 540 nm could improve daytime sleep quality and nighttime vigilance of night shiftworkers. Eight permanent night shiftworkers (32-56 yrs of age) of Quebec City's Canada Post distribution center were evaluated during summertime, and twenty others (24-55 yrs of age) during fall and winter. Timing, efficacy, and fragmentation of daytime sleep were analyzed over four weeks by a wrist activity monitor, and subjective vigilance was additionally assessed at the end of the night shift in the fall-winter group. The first two weeks served as baseline and the remaining two as experimental weeks when workers had to wear blue-blockers glasses, either just before leaving the workplace at the end of their shift (summer group) or 2 h before the end of the night shift (fall-winter group). They all had to wear the glasses when outside during the day until 16:00 h. When wearing the glasses, workers slept, on average +/-SD, 32+/-29 and 34+/-60 more min/day, increased their sleep efficacy by 1.95+/-2.17% and 4.56+/-6.1%, and lowered their sleep fragmentation by 1.74+/-1.36% and 4.22+/-9.16% in the summer and fall-winter group, respectively. Subjective vigilance also generally improved on Fridays in the fall-winter group. Blue-blockers seem to improve daytime sleep of permanent night-shift workers.
Address Centre de Recherche Universite Laval Robert-Giffard/Department of Oto Rhino Laryngology and Ophtalmology, Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19637050 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 295
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Author Thorne, H.C.; Jones, K.H.; Peters, S.P.; Archer, S.N.; Dijk, D.-J.
Title Daily and seasonal variation in the spectral composition of light exposure in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 26 Issue (up) 5 Pages 854-866
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Circadian Rhythm; Climate; Female; Genetic Variation; Humans; *Light; Male; Photochemistry/methods; Research Design; Rod Opsins/chemistry/genetics; *Seasons; Sleep
Abstract Light is considered the most potent synchronizer of the human circadian system and exerts many other non-image-forming effects, including those that affect brain function. These effects are mediated in part by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells that express the photopigment melanopsin. The spectral sensitivity of melanopsin is greatest for blue light at approximately 480 nm. At present, there is little information on how the spectral composition of light to which people are exposed varies over the 24 h period and across seasons. Twenty-two subjects, aged 22+/-4 yrs (mean+/-SD) participated during the winter months (November-February), and 12 subjects aged 25+/-3 yrs participated during the summer months (April-August). Subjects wore Actiwatch-RGB monitors, as well as Actiwatch-L monitors, for seven consecutive days while living in England. These monitors measured activity and light exposure in the red, green, and blue spectral regions, in addition to broad-spectrum white light, with a 2 min resolution. Light exposure during the day was analyzed for the interval between 09:00 and 21:00 h. The time course of white-light exposure differed significantly between seasons (p = 0.0022), with light exposure increasing in the morning hours and declining in the afternoon hours, and with a more prominent decline in the winter. Overall light exposure was significantly higher in summer than winter (p = 0.0002). Seasonal differences in the relative contribution of blue-light exposure to overall light exposure were also observed (p = 0.0006), in particular during the evening hours. During the summer evenings (17:00-21:00 h), the relative contribution of blue light was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) (40.2+/-1.1%) than during winter evenings (26.6+/-0.9%). The present data show that in addition to overall light exposure, the spectral composition of light exposure varies over the day and with season.
Address Surrey Sleep Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK. helen.thorne@surrey.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19637047 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 298
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Author Boivin, D.B.; Boudreau, P.; Tremblay, G.M.
Title Phototherapy and orange-tinted goggles for night-shift adaptation of police officers on patrol Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 29 Issue (up) 5 Pages 629-640
Keywords Human Health; Adaptation, Physiological/*physiology; Adult; Attention/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Color; Darkness; *Eye Protective Devices/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Light; Male; Melatonin/analogs & derivatives/metabolism/urine; Phototherapy/*adverse effects; *Police; Psychomotor Performance/*physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/physiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology
Abstract The aim of the present combined field and laboratory study was to assess circadian entrainment in two groups of police officers working seven consecutive 8/8.5-h night shifts as part of a rotating schedule. Eight full-time police officers on patrol (mean age +/- SD: 29.8 +/- 6.5 yrs) were provided an intervention consisting of intermittent exposure to wide-spectrum bright light at night, orange-tinted goggles at sunrise, and maintenance of a regular sleep/darkness episode in the day. Orange-tinted goggles have been shown to block the melatonin-suppressing effect of light significantly more than neutral gray density goggles. Nine control group police officers (mean age +/- SD: 30.3 +/- 4.1 yrs) working the same schedule were enrolled. Police officers were studied before, after (in the laboratory), and during (ambulatory) a series of seven consecutive nights. Urine samples were collected at wake time and bedtime throughout the week of night work and during laboratory visits (1 x /3 h) preceding and following the work week to measure urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (UaMT6s) excretion rate. Subjective alertness was assessed at the start, middle, and end of night shifts. A 10-min psychomotor vigilance task was performed at the start and end of each shift. Both laboratory visits consisted of two 8-h sleep episodes based on the prior schedule. Saliva samples were collected 2 x /h during waking episodes to assay their melatonin content. Subjective alertness (3 x /h) and performance (1 x /2 h) were assessed during wake periods in the laboratory. A mixed linear model was used to analyze the progression of UaMt6s excreted during daytime sleep episodes at home, as well as psychomotor performance and subjective alertness during night shifts. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (factors: laboratory visit and group) were used to compare peak salivary melatonin and UaMT6s excretion rate in the laboratory. In both groups of police officers, the excretion rate of UaMT6s at home was higher during daytime sleep episodes at the end compared to the start of the work week (p < .001). This rate increased significantly more in the intervention than control group (p = .032). A significant phase delay of salivary melatonin was observed in both groups at the end of study (p = .009), although no significant between-group difference was reached. Reaction speed dropped, and subjective alertness decreased throughout the night shift in both groups (p < .001). Reaction speed decreased throughout the work week in the control group (p </= .021), whereas no difference was observed in the intervention group. Median reaction time was increased as of the 5th and 6th nights compared to the 2nd night in controls (p </= .003), whereas it remained stable in the intervention group. These observations indicate better physiological adaptation in the intervention group compared to the controls.
Address Centre for Study and Treatment of Circadian Rhythms , Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. diane.boivin@douglas.mcgill.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22621360 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 509
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Author Kayumov, L.; Casper, R.F.; Hawa, R.J.; Perelman, B.; Chung, S.A.; Sokalsky, S.; Shapiro, C.M.
Title Blocking low-wavelength light prevents nocturnal melatonin suppression with no adverse effect on performance during simulated shift work Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab
Volume 90 Issue (up) 5 Pages 2755-2761
Keywords Lighting; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/*secretion; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract Decreases in melatonin production in human and animals are known to be caused by environmental lighting, especially short-wavelength lighting (between 470 and 525 nm). We investigated the novel hypothesis that the use of goggles with selective exclusion of all wavelengths less than 530 nm could prevent the suppression of melatonin in bright-light conditions during a simulated shift-work experiment. Salivary melatonin levels were measured under dim (<5 lux), bright (800 lux), and filtered (800 lux) light at hourly intervals between 2000 and 0800 h in 11 healthy young males and eight females (mean age, 24.7 +/- 4.6 yr). The measurements were performed during three nonconsecutive nights over a 2-wk period. Subjective sleepiness was measured by self-report scales, whereas objective performance was assessed with the Continuous Performance Test. All subjects demonstrated preserved melatonin levels in filtered light similar to their dim-light secretion profile. Unfiltered bright light drastically suppressed melatonin production. Normalization of endogenous melatonin production while wearing goggles did not impair measures of performance, subjective sleepiness, or alertness.
Address Sleep Research Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, ECW 3D-035, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. lkayumov@uhnres.utoronto.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15713707 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 640
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Author Brainard, G.C.; Sliney, D.; Hanifin, J.P.; Glickman, G.; Byrne, B.; Greeson, J.M.; Jasser, S.; Gerner, E.; Rollag, M.D.
Title Sensitivity of the human circadian system to short-wavelength (420-nm) light Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 23 Issue (up) 5 Pages 379-386
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Models, Biological; Neurosecretory Systems; Photons; Pineal Gland/metabolism; Retinal Ganglion Cells/*metabolism; Vision, Ocular
Abstract The circadian and neurobehavioral effects of light are primarily mediated by a retinal ganglion cell photoreceptor in the mammalian eye containing the photopigment melanopsin. Nine action spectrum studies using rodents, monkeys, and humans for these responses indicate peak sensitivities in the blue region of the visible spectrum ranging from 459 to 484 nm, with some disagreement in short-wavelength sensitivity of the spectrum. The aim of this work was to quantify the sensitivity of human volunteers to monochromatic 420-nm light for plasma melatonin suppression. Adult female (n=14) and male (n=12) subjects participated in 2 studies, each employing a within-subjects design. In a fluence-response study, subjects (n=8) were tested with 8 light irradiances at 420 nm ranging over a 4-log unit photon density range of 10(10) to 10(14) photons/cm(2)/sec and 1 dark exposure control night. In the other study, subjects (n=18) completed an experiment comparing melatonin suppression with equal photon doses (1.21 x 10(13) photons/cm(2)/sec) of 420 nm and 460 nm monochromatic light and a dark exposure control night. The first study demonstrated a clear fluence-response relationship between 420-nm light and melatonin suppression (p<0.001) with a half-saturation constant of 2.74 x 10(11) photons/cm(2)/sec. The second study showed that 460-nm light is significantly stronger than 420-nm light for suppressing melatonin (p<0.04). Together, the results clarify the visible short-wavelength sensitivity of the human melatonin suppression action spectrum. This basic physiological finding may be useful for optimizing lighting for therapeutic and other applications.
Address Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. george.brainard@jefferson.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:18838601 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 724
Permanent link to this record