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Author Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.; Dauchy, R.T.; Hanifin, J.P.; Davidson, L.K.; Krause, J.A.; Sauer, L.A.; Rivera-Bermudez, M.A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Jasser, S.A.; Lynch, D.T.; Rollag, M.D.; Zalatan, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Melatonin-depleted blood from premenopausal women exposed to light at night stimulates growth of human breast cancer xenografts in nude rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res  
  Volume 65 Issue 23 Pages 11174-11184  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*blood/genetics/pathology; Cell Growth Processes/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Humans; Light; Liver Neoplasms, Experimental/metabolism; Male; Melatonin/blood/*deficiency; Premenopause/blood; RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis/genetics; Rats; Rats, Nude; Receptors, Melatonin/biosynthesis/genetics; Transplantation, Heterologous  
  Abstract The increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers has been postulated to result from the suppression of pineal melatonin production by exposure to light at night. Exposure of rats bearing rat hepatomas or human breast cancer xenografts to increasing intensities of white fluorescent light during each 12-hour dark phase (0-345 microW/cm2) resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of nocturnal melatonin blood levels and a stimulation of tumor growth and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism to the mitogenic molecule 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid. Venous blood samples were collected from healthy, premenopausal female volunteers during either the daytime, nighttime, or nighttime following 90 minutes of ocular bright, white fluorescent light exposure at 580 microW/cm2 (i.e., 2,800 lx). Compared with tumors perfused with daytime-collected melatonin-deficient blood, human breast cancer xenografts and rat hepatomas perfused in situ, with nocturnal, physiologically melatonin-rich blood collected during the night, exhibited markedly suppressed proliferative activity and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism. Tumors perfused with melatonin-deficient blood collected following ocular exposure to light at night exhibited the daytime pattern of high tumor proliferative activity. These results are the first to show that the tumor growth response to exposure to light during darkness is intensity dependent and that the human nocturnal, circadian melatonin signal not only inhibits human breast cancer growth but that this effect is extinguished by short-term ocular exposure to bright, white light at night. These mechanistic studies are the first to provide a rational biological explanation for the increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers.  
  Address Laboratory of Chrono-Neuroendocrine Oncology, Bassett Research Institute, The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York 13326, USA. david.blask@bassett.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16322268 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 721  
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Author Hansen, J.; Lassen, C.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Nested case-control study of night shift work and breast cancer risk among women in the Danish military Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Occup Environ Med  
  Volume 69 Issue 8 Pages 551-556  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Denmark/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Middle Aged; Military Personnel; *Occupations; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; *Sunlight; *Work; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Growing but limited evidence suggests that night shift work is associated with breast cancer. The authors conducted a nationwide case-control study nested within a cohort of 18,551 female military employees born in 1929-1968 to investigate the risk for breast cancer after night shift work and to explore the role of leisure time sun exposure and diurnal preference. METHODS: The authors documented 218 cases of breast cancer (1990-2003) and selected 899 age-matched controls from the cohort by incidence density sampling. Information on shift work, sun exposure habits, diurnal preference and other potential confounders was obtained from a structured questionnaire. ORs were estimated by multivariate conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, the authors observed an adjusted OR of 1.4 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.1) among women with ever compared with never night shifts. The RR for breast cancer tended to increase with increasing number of years of night shift work (p=0.03) and with cumulative number of shifts (p=0.02),with a neutral risk for fewer than three night shifts per week. The OR for the group with the highest tertile of cumulative exposure was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.6). The most pronounced effect of night shift work on breast cancer risk was observed in women with morning chronotype preference and intense night shifts (OR=3.9, 95% CI 1.6 to 9.5). Night shift workers tended to sunbathe more frequently than day workers. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that frequent night shift work increases the risk for breast cancer and suggest a higher risk with longer duration of intense night shifts. Women with morning preference who worked on night shifts tended to have a higher risk than those with evening preference.  
  Address Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, Copenhagen DK2100, Denmark. johnni@cancer.dk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1351-0711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22645325 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 156  
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Author Schmoll, C.; Khan, A.; Aspinall, P.; Goudie, C.; Koay, P.; Tendo, C.; Cameron, J.; Roe, J.; Deary, I.; Dhillon, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) New light for old eyes: comparing melanopsin-mediated non-visual benefits of blue-light and UV-blocking intraocular lenses Type
  Year 2014 Publication The British Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal Br J Ophthalmol  
  Volume 98 Issue 1 Pages 124-128  
  Keywords Aged; Cataract/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cognition/*physiology; Female; Humans; Lens Implantation, Intraocular; *Lenses, Intraocular; Light; Male; Phacoemulsification; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Reaction Time/physiology; Regression Analysis; Rod Opsins/*physiology; Sleep/*physiology; Physiology; Retina; blue blocker; blue light  
  Abstract BACKGROUND/AIMS: Melanopsin-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells form a blue-light-sensitive non-visual system mediating diverse physiological effects including circadian entrainment and cognitive alertness. Reduced blue wavelength retinal illumination through cataract formation is thought to blunt these responses while cataract surgery and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation have been shown to have beneficial effects on sleep and cognition. We aimed to use the reaction time (RT) task and the Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) as a validated objective platform to compare non-visual benefits of UV- and blue-blocking IOLs. METHODS: Patients were prospectively randomised to receive either a UV- or blue-blocking IOL, performing an RT test and ESS questionnaire before and after surgery. Optical blurring at the second test controlled for visual improvement. Non-operative age-matched controls were recruited for comparison. RESULTS: 80 participants completed the study. Those undergoing first-eye phacoemulsification demonstrated significant improvements in RT over control (p=0.001) and second-eye surgery patients (p=0.03). Moreover, reduced daytime sleepiness was measured by ESS for the first-eye surgery group (p=0.008) but not for the second-eye group (p=0.09). Choice of UV- or blue-blocking IOL made no significant difference to magnitude of cognitive improvement (p=0.272). CONCLUSIONS: Phacoemulsification, particularly first-eye surgery, has a strong positive effect on cognition and daytime alertness, regardless of IOL type.  
  Address Princess Alexandra Eye Hospital, , Edinburgh, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24158845 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 342  
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Author Abay, K.A.; Amare, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Night light intensity and women's body weight: Evidence from Nigeria Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Economics and Human Biology Abbreviated Journal Econ Hum Biol  
  Volume 31 Issue Pages 238-248  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Body Mass Index; *Body Weight; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Lighting/*statistics & numerical data; Middle Aged; Nigeria/epidemiology; Obesity/epidemiology; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prevalence; *Urbanization; Young Adult; *Bmi; *Nigeria; *Night light; *Obesity; *Overweight; *Urbanization  
  Abstract The prevalence of overweight and obesity are increasing in many African countries and hence becoming regional public health challenges. We employ satellite-based night light intensity data as a proxy for urbanization to investigate the relationship between urbanization and women's body weight. We use two rounds of the Demographic and Health Survey data from Nigeria. We employ both nonparametric and parametric estimation approaches that exploit both the cross-sectional and longitudinal variations in night light intensities. Our empirical analysis reveals nonlinear relationships between night light intensity and women's body weight measures. Doubling the sample's average level of night light intensity is associated with up to a ten percentage point increase in the probability of overweight. However, despite the generally positive relationship between night light intensity and women's body weight, the strength of the relationship varies across the assorted stages of night light intensity. Early stages of night light intensity are not significantly associated with women's body weight, while higher stages of nightlight intensities are associated with higher rates of overweight and obesity. Given that night lights are strong predictors of urbanization and related economic activities, our results hint at nonlinear relationships between various stages of urbanization and women's body weight.  
  Address International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), USA. Electronic address: M.Amare@cgiar.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1570-677X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30312904 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2714  
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Author Menegaux, F.; Truong, T.; Anger, A.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Lamkarkach, F.; Arveux, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Fevotte, J.; Guenel, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Night work and breast cancer: a population-based case-control study in France (the CECILE study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 924-931  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Employment; Female; France/epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Occupations; Pregnancy; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract Night work involving disruption of circadian rhythm was suggested as a possible cause of breast cancer. We examined the role of night work in a large population-based case-control study carried out in France between 2005 and 2008. Lifetime occupational history including work schedules of each night work period was elicited in 1,232 cases of breast cancer and 1,317 population controls. Thirteen percent of the cases and 11% of the controls had ever worked on night shifts (OR = 1.27 [95% confidence interval = 0.99-1.64]). Odds ratios were 1.35 [1.01-1.80] in women who worked on overnight shifts, 1.40 [1.01-1.92] in women who had worked at night for 4.5 or more years, and 1.43 [1.01-2.03] in those who worked less than three nights per week on average. The odds ratio was 1.95 [1.13-3.35] in women employed in night work for >4 years before their first full-term pregnancy, a period where mammary gland cells are incompletely differentiated and possibly more susceptible to circadian disruption effects. Our results support the hypothesis that night work plays a role in breast cancer, particularly in women who started working at night before first full-term pregnancy.  
  Address Inserm, CESP Center for research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France; Univ Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22689255 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 781  
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