toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Ruger, M.; St Hilaire, M.A.; Brainard, G.C.; Khalsa, S.-B.S.; Kronauer, R.E.; Czeisler, C.A.; Lockley, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human phase response curve to a single 6.5 h pulse of short-wavelength light Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol  
  Volume (down) 591 Issue Pt 1 Pages 353-363  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Body Temperature; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/physiology; Young Adult; blue light; melatonin; photic response; whort-wavelength  
  Abstract The photic resetting response of the human circadian pacemaker depends on the timing of exposure, and the direction and magnitude of the resulting shift is described by a phase response curve (PRC). Previous PRCs in humans have utilized high-intensity polychromatic white light. Given that the circadian photoreception system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength visible light, the aim of the current study was to construct a PRC to blue (480 nm) light and compare it to a 10,000 lux white light PRC constructed previously using a similar protocol. Eighteen young healthy participants (18-30 years) were studied for 9-10 days in a time-free environment. The protocol included three baseline days followed by a constant routine (CR) to assess initial circadian phase. Following this CR, participants were exposed to a 6.5 h 480 nm light exposure (11.8 muW cm(-2), 11.2 lux) following mydriasis via a modified Ganzfeld dome. A second CR was conducted following the light exposure to re-assess circadian phase. Phase shifts were calculated from the difference in dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) between CRs. Exposure to 6.5 h of 480 nm light resets the circadian pacemaker according to a conventional type 1 PRC with fitted maximum delays and advances of -2.6 h and 1.3 h, respectively. The 480 nm PRC induced approximately 75% of the response of the 10,000 lux white light PRC. These results may contribute to a re-evaluation of dosing guidelines for clinical light therapy and the use of light as a fatigue countermeasure.  
  Address Circadian Physiology Program, Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. mrueger@rics.bwh.harvard.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23090946; PMCID:PMC3630790 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 239  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Revell, V.L.; Molina, T.A.; Eastman, C.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol  
  Volume (down) 590 Issue Pt 19 Pages 4859-4868  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Circadian Clocks/physiology/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/analysis/physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Young Adult; blue light  
  Abstract Light shifts the timing of the circadian clock according to a phase response curve (PRC). To date, all human light PRCs have been to long durations of bright white light. However, melanopsin, the primary photopigment for the circadian system, is most sensitive to short wavelength blue light. Therefore, to optimise light treatment it is important to generate a blue light PRC.We used a small, commercially available blue LED light box, screen size 11.2 x 6.6 cm at approximately 50 cm, approximately 200 muW cm(-2), approximately 185 lux. Subjects participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Each session consisted of circadian phase assessments to obtain melatonin profiles before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light-dark cycle (2.5 h wake in dim light, 1.5 h sleep in the dark), forced desynchrony protocol. During one session subjects received intermittent blue light (three 30 min pulses over 2 h) once a day for the 3 days of free-running, and in the other session (control) they remained in dim room light, counterbalanced. The time of blue light was varied among subjects to cover the entire 24 h day. For each individual, the phase shift to blue light was corrected for the free-run determined during the control session. The blue light PRC had a broad advance region starting in the morning and extending through the afternoon. The delay region started a few hours before bedtime and extended through the night. This is the first PRC to be constructed to blue light and to a stimulus that could be used in the real world.  
  Address University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22753544; PMCID:PMC3487041 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 345  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nadis, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biologists join drive to turn down the lights Type
  Year 2002 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume (down) 419 Issue 6910 Pages 868  
  Keywords Ecology; Animal Migration; Animals; Astronomical Phenomena; Astronomy; Biology/*trends; Breast Neoplasms/etiology; Environment; Environmental Pollution/*adverse effects/prevention & control; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Risk Factors; Vision, Ocular/physiology  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12410271 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 787  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Czeisler, C.A.; Shanahan, T.L.; Klerman, E.B.; Martens, H.; Brotman, D.J.; Emens, J.S.; Klein, T.; Rizzo, J.F. 3rd url  doi
openurl 
  Title Suppression of melatonin secretion in some blind patients by exposure to bright light Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication The New England Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal N Engl J Med  
  Volume (down) 332 Issue 1 Pages 6-11  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Blindness/etiology/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/blood/*secretion; Middle Aged; Photic Stimulation; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/physiopathology; Visual Perception  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Complete blindness generally results in the loss of synchronization of circadian rhythms to the 24-hour day and in recurrent insomnia. However, some blind patients maintain circadian entrainment. We undertook this study to determine whether some blind patients' eyes convey sufficient photic information to entrain the hypothalamic circadian pacemaker and suppress melatonin secretion, despite an apparently complete loss of visual function. METHODS: We evaluated the input of light to the circadian pacemaker by testing the ability of bright light to decrease plasma melatonin concentrations in 11 blind patients with no conscious perception of light and in 6 normal subjects. We also evaluated circadian entrainment over time in the blind patients. RESULTS: Plasma melatonin concentrations decreased during exposure to bright light in three sightless patients by an average (+/- SD) of 69 +/- 21 percent and in the normal subjects by an average of 66 +/- 15 percent. When two of these blind patients were tested with their eyes covered during exposure to light, plasma melatonin did not decrease. The three blind patients reported no difficulty sleeping and maintained apparent circadian entrainment to the 24-hour day. Plasma melatonin concentrations did not decrease during exposure to bright light in seven of the remaining blind patients; in the eighth, plasma melatonin was undetectable. These eight patients reported a history of insomnia, and in four the circadian temperature rhythm was not entrained to the 24-hour day. CONCLUSIONS: The visual subsystem that mediates light-induced suppression of melatonin secretion remains functionally intact in some sightless patients. The absence of photic input to the circadian system thus constitutes a distinct form of blindness, associated with periodic insomnia, that afflicts most but not all patients with no conscious perception of light.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-4793 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:7990870 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 732  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schoech, S.J.; Bowman, R.; Hahn, T.P.; Goymann, W.; Schwabl, I.; Bridge, E.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of low levels of light at night upon the endocrine physiology of western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological Genetics and Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol  
  Volume (down) 319 Issue 9 Pages 527-538  
  Keywords Animals; Corticosterone/blood; Ecosystem; Female; *Light; Male; Melatonin/blood; Passeriformes/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Reproduction/*physiology; Testosterone/blood  
  Abstract Florida scrub-jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) in the suburbs breed earlier than jays in native habitat. Amongst the possible factors that influence this advance (e.g., food availability, microclimate, predator regime, etc.), is exposure to artificial lights at night (LAN). LAN could stimulate the reproductive axis of the suburban jays. Alternatively, LAN could inhibit pineal melatonin (MEL), thus removing its inhibitory influence on the reproductive axis. Because Florida scrub-jays are a threatened species, we used western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) to investigate the effects of LAN upon reproductive hormones and melatonin. Jays were held under conditions in which the dark-phase of the light:dark cycle was without illumination and then under low levels of LAN. Under both conditions, birds were exposed first to short-days (9.5L:14.5D) that were gradually increased to long-days (14.5L:9.5D). At various times, blood samples were collected during the light part of the cycle to measure reproductive hormones (luteinizing hormone, LH; testosterone, T; and estradiol, E2 ). Similarly, samples to assess melatonin were collected during the dark. In males, LAN caused a depression in LH levels and levels were approximately 4x greater under long- than short-days. In females, there was no effect of LAN or photoperiod upon LH. LAN resulted in depressed T levels in females, although there was no effect on T in males. E2 levels in both sexes were lower under LAN than under an unlighted dark-phase. Paradoxically, MEL was higher in jays under LAN, and under long-days. MEL did not differ by sex. LAN disrupted the extraordinarily strong correlation between T and E2 that existed under unlighted nocturnal conditions. Overall, our findings fail to support the hypothesis that LAN stimulates the reproductive axis. Rather, the data demonstrate that LAN tends to inhibit reproductive hormone secretion, although not in a consistent fashion between the sexes.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-5223 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23970442 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 37  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: