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Author (up) Gabriel, K.M.A.; Kuechly, H.U.; Falchi, F.; Wosniok, W.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Resources of dark skies in German climatic health resorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol  
  Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 11-22  
  Keywords Circadian rhythm; Germany; Health resorts; Light pollution; Regulation; Remote sensing  
  Abstract Illumination of nocturnal environments is increasing steadily worldwide. While there are some benefits for mankind, light at night affects animals, plants, and human health by blurring the natural distinction between day and night. International regulations exist to protect the environment for the maintenance of human health but nocturnal darkness is not considered. In Germany, cities and communities labeled as Climatic Health Resorts provide for high standards in air quality. However, their degree of nocturnal darkness is unexplored so far. In our study, we examined the degree of nocturnal darkness in German Climatic Health Resorts by two datasets based on georeferenced remote sensing data. The majority of Climatic Health Resorts (93.1 %) are able to offer a relative respite (>/= 20 mag/arcsec2) from a degraded nocturnal environment, while only 3.4 % are able to offer a dark, if by no means pristine, night environment (>/= 21 mag/arcsec2). Climatic Health Resorts emit less light as well as are less affected by night sky brightness compared to the average of non-classified communities. In combination with daytime requirements, the resorts provide conditions for a more distinct day-and-night-cycle than non-classified communities.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute for Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27192999 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1456  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Labuda, M.; Koch, R.; Nagyová, A. url  openurl
  Title “Dark Sky Parks” as measure to support nature tourism in large protection areas – case study in the Nature Park “Nossentiner/Schwinzer Heide” Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Naturschutz und Landschaftsplanung Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 47 Issue 12 Pages 380-388  
  Keywords Society; dark sky parks; tourism; astrotourism; economic impact; economics; economic benefit; Germany  
  Abstract Some of the key characteristics of environmentally compatible. tourism are the minimisation of negative impacts on the environment and the preservation of the ecological capacity. “Dark Sky Parks” are one of the important measures to support nature tourism in large protection areas. Using the example of the Nature Park “Nossentiner/Schwinzer Heide” the paper introduces a concept of 'astrotourism': measurements of the brightness (magnitude) of the nocturnal sky, selection of suitable sites for astronomic observations, development of a lighting plan which mainly aims to define rules and guidelines for the outdoor lighting, and measures to protect the nocturnal sky and reduce the light pollution in the future Dark Sky Park. The region of the Nature Park Nossentiner/Schwinzer Heide is characterised by a minor light pollution, due to a low settlement density and its large, coherent forest areas. This fact contributes to the protection of nocturnal species and it can be used for the future tourism concept in the protection area. The presented concept to develop nature tourism shows a reaction on one of the fastest environmental changes: the decreasing intensity of natural darkness due to artificial light sources.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Eugen Ulmer KG Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0940-6808 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1341  
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Author (up) Nordt, A.; Klenke, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleepless in town--drivers of the temporal shift in dawn song in urban European blackbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 8 Pages e71476  
  Keywords Animals; Automobiles; Cities; Ecosystem; Germany; Humans; Light; Male; Noise; Photoperiod; Sleep; Songbirds/*physiology; Urban Population; *Vocalization, Animal; dawn chorus; morning chorus  
  Abstract Organisms living in urban environments are exposed to different environmental conditions compared to their rural conspecifics. Especially anthropogenic noise and artificial night light are closely linked to urbanization and pose new challenges to urban species. Songbirds are particularly affected by these factors, because they rely on the spread of acoustic information and adjust their behaviour to the rhythm of night and day, e.g. time their dawn song according to changing light intensities. Our aim was to clarify the specific contributions of artificial night light and traffic noise on the timing of dawn song of urban European Blackbirds (Turdus merula). We investigated the onset of blackbird dawn song along a steep urban gradient ranging from an urban forest to the city centre of Leipzig, Germany. This gradient of anthropogenic noise and artificial night light was reflected in the timing of dawn song. In the city centre, blackbirds started their dawn song up to 5 hours earlier compared to those in semi-natural habitats. We found traffic noise to be the driving factor of the shift of dawn song into true night, although it was not completely separable from the effects of ambient night light. We additionally included meteorological conditions into the analysis and found an effect on the song onset. Cloudy and cold weather delayed the onset, but cloud cover was assumed to reflect night light emissions, thus, amplified sky luminance and increased the effect of artificial night light. Beside these temporal effects, we also found differences in the spatial autocorrelation of dawn song onset showing a much higher variability in noisy city areas than in rural parks and forests. These findings indicate that urban hazards such as ambient noise and light pollution show a manifold interference with naturally evolved cycles and have significant effects on the activity patterns of urban blackbirds.  
  Address Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Conservation Biology, Leipzig, Germany. anja.nordt@ufz.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23940759; PMCID:PMC3737108 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 43  
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Author (up) Vollmer, C.; Michel, U.; Randler, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night (LAN) is correlated with eveningness in adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 502-508  
  Keywords Adolescent; *Adolescent Behavior/drug effects; Biological Clocks; Central Nervous System Stimulants/administration & dosage; *Circadian Rhythm/drug effects; Computers; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Germany; Humans; *Light; Lighting; Male; *Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Questionnaires; *Sleep/drug effects; Television; Time Factors; Video Games; *Wakefulness/drug effects  
  Abstract External zeitgebers synchronize the human circadian rhythm of sleep and wakefulness. Humans adapt their chronotype to the day-night cycle, the strongest external zeitgeber. The human circadian rhythm shifts to evening-type orientation when daylight is prolonged into the evening and night hours by artificial light sources. Data from a survey of 1507 German adolescents covering questions about chronotype and electronic screen media use combined with nocturnal satellite image data suggest a relationship between chronotype and artificial nocturnal light. Adolescents living in brightly illuminated urban districts had a stronger evening-type orientation than adolescents living in darker and more rural municipalities. This result persisted when controlling for time use of electronic screen media, intake of stimulants, type of school, age, puberty status, time of sunrise, sex, and population density. Time spent on electronic screen media use-a source of indoor light at night-is also correlated with eveningness, as well as intake of stimulants, age, and puberty status, and, to a lesser degree, type of school and time of sunrise. Adequate urban development design and parents limiting adolescents' electronic screen media use in the evening could help to adjust adolescents' zeitgeber to early school schedules when they provide appropriate lighting conditions for daytime and for nighttime.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Education Heidelberg, Germany. vollmer@ph-heidelberg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22214237 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 150  
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Author (up) Vollmer, C.; Randler, C.; Di Milia, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Further evidence for the influence of photoperiod at birth on chronotype in a sample of German adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 10 Pages 1345-1351  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Child; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Germany; Humans; Male; Parturition/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Puberty/physiology; *Seasons; Sleep/*physiology  
  Abstract Individuals differ in their circadian preferences (chronotype). There is evidence in the literature to support a season-of-birth effect on chronotype but the evidence is not convincing. In part, the relationship is obscured by a number of methodological differences between studies, including the measures used to define morningness, the way in which the seasons were categorized, and the sample size. This study adds to the literature in several ways. First, we adopt a new approach to categorizing the photoperiod rather than the calendar season; thus we prefer to use the term photoperiod at birth. Second, we used two measures of morningness. Third, we used a large and homogeneous German sample. The results show that adolescents (n = 2905) born during the increasing photoperiod (Feb-Apr) had a significantly later midpoint of sleep (MSFsc) than those born during the decreasing photoperiod (Aug-Oct). A similar pattern was found for the Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM). Furthermore, both measures of chronotype demonstrated a significant quadratic function over a 1-yr cycle. When looking at each of six consecutive years separately, the Composite Scale of Morningness suggests a cosine rhythm linked to increasing and decreasing photoperiods that becomes weaker in amplitude with increasing age. Despite the strengths in our study, the effect of photoperiod at birth on chronotype remains small. Future studies may require larger sample sizes, may need to explore how neonatal light exposure modulates chronotype, and may need to track how puberty and adolescent lifestyle habits mask the photoperiod effect.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Education Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 561-2, Heidelberg, Germany. vollmer@ph-heidelberg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23130997 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 517  
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