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Author (down) Xiao, Q.; James, P.; Breheny, P.; Jia, P.; Park, Y.; Zhang, D.; Fisher, J.A.; Ward, M.H.; Jones, R.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in the NIH-AARP diet and health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; circadian disruption; outdoor light at night; postmenopausal breast cancer; prospective cohort  
  Abstract Circadian disruption may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. Previous studies reported relationships between outdoor light at night (LAN) and the breast cancer risk, but their findings are mixed. There is also a need to examine LAN and breast cancer incidence according to different individual and environmental characteristics to identify subpopulations at greater risk associated with LAN exposure. We studied residential outdoor LAN estimated from satellite imagery at baseline (1996) in relation to postmenopausal breast cancer incidence over ~16 years of follow-up in 186 981 postmenopausal women including 12 318 incident postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the relationship between quintiles of LAN and postmenopausal breast cancer risk, overall and by hormone receptor status and cancer stage. We found that when compared to women in the lowest quintile of baseline LAN, those in the highest quintile had a 10% increase in postmenopausal breast cancer risk (HR (95% CI), 1.10 (1.02, 1.18), P-trend, .002). The association appeared to be stronger for estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer (1.12 [1.02, 1.24], .007) than for ER-negative cancer (1.07 [0.85, 1.34], .66). Our findings also suggested that the relationship between LAN and breast cancer risk may differ by individual characteristics, such as smoking, alcohol drinking, sleep duration and BMI, and neighborhood environment. In conclusion, our study suggests that higher outdoor LAN exposure may be a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer.  
  Address Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32488897 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2976  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Xiao, Q.; Gee, G.; Jones, R.R.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Hale, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cross-sectional association between outdoor artificial light at night and sleep duration in middle-to-older aged adults: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 180 Issue Pages 108823  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Artificial light at night; Circadian disruption; Neighborhood; Sleep; Socioeconomic disadvantage  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause sleep disturbances. Several previous epidemiological studies have reported an association between higher levels of outdoor ALAN and shorter sleep duration. However, it remains unclear how this association may differ by individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status, and whether ALAN may also be associated with longer sleep duration. METHODS: We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between outdoor ALAN and self-reported sleep duration in 333,365 middle- to older-aged men and women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Study participants reported baseline addresses, which were geocoded and linked with outdoor ALAN exposure measured by satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the multinomial odds ratio (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the likelihood of reporting very short (<5h), short (<7h) and long (>/=9h) sleep relative to reporting 7-8h of sleep across quintiles of LAN. We also conducted subgroup analyses by individual-level education and census tract-level poverty levels. RESULTS: We found that higher levels of ALAN were associated with both very short and short sleep. When compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ALAN was associated with 16% and 25% increases in the likelihood of reporting short sleep in women (MORQ1 vs Q5, (95% CI), 1.16 (1.10, 1.22)) and men (1.25 (1.19, 1.31)), respectively. Moreover, we found that higher ALAN was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of reporting long sleep in men (0.79 (0.71, 0.89)). We also found that the associations between ALAN and short sleep were larger in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of short sleep may be higher among residents in areas with higher levels of outdoor LAN, and this association is likely stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Future studies should investigate the potential benefits of reducing light intensity in high ALAN areas in improve sleep health.  
  Address Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31627155 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2702  
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Author (down) Xiang, S.; Dauchy, R.T.; Hoffman, A.E.; Pointer, D.; Frasch, T.; Blask, D.E.; Hill, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Epigenetic inhibition of the tumor suppressor ARHI by light at night-induced circadian melatonin disruption mediates STAT3-driven paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 67 Issue 2 Pages e12586  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Cancer; tumor suppression  
  Abstract Disruption of circadian time structure and suppression of circadian nocturnal melatonin (MLT) production by exposure to dim light at night (dLAN), as occurs with night shift work and/or disturbed sleep-wake cycles, is associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer and resistance to tamoxifen and doxorubicin. Melatonin inhibition of human breast cancer chemo-resistance involves mechanisms including suppression of tumor metabolism and inhibition of kinases and transcription factors which are often activated in drug-resistant breast cancer. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), frequently overexpressed and activated in Paclitaxel (PTX)-resistant breast cancer, promotes the expression of DNA methyltransferase one (DNMT1) to epigenetically suppresses the transcription of tumor suppressor Aplasia Ras homolog one (ARHI) which can sequester STAT3 in the cytoplasm to block PTX-resistance. We demonstrate that breast tumor xenografts in rats exposed to dLAN and circadian MLT disrupted express elevated levels of phosphorylated and acetylated STAT3, increased DNMT1, but reduced Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and ARHI. Furthermore, MLT and/or SIRT1 administration blocked/reversed Interleukin 6 (IL-6)-induced acetylation of STAT3 and its methylation of ARH1 to increase ARH1 mRNA expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Finally, analyses of the I-SPY 1 trial demonstrates that elevated MT1 receptor expression is significantly correlated with pathologic complete response following neo-adjuvant therapy in breast cancer patients. This is the first study to demonstrate circadian disruption of MLT by dLAN driving intrinsic resistance to PTX via epigenetic mechanisms increasing STAT3 expression and that MLT administration can reestablish sensitivity of breast tumors to PTX and drive tumor regression.  
  Address Tulane Circadian Cancer Biology Group, New Orleans, Louisiana  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31077613 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2383  
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Author (down) Wyse, C.A.; Selman, C.; Page, M.M.; Coogan, A.N.; Hazlerigg, D.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian desynchrony and metabolic dysfunction; did light pollution make us fat? Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Med Hypotheses  
  Volume 77 Issue 6 Pages 1139-1144  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/etiology; History, 20th Century; History, 21st Century; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects/history/statistics & numerical data; Metabolic Diseases/*complications/etiology; Mice; *Models, Biological; Obesity/*epidemiology/*etiology; *Photoperiod; Rats  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations in physiology and behaviour that recur with a period of 24h, and that are entrained by the daily photoperiod. The cycle of sunrise and sunset provided a reliable time cue for many thousands of years, until the advent of artificial lighting disrupted the entrainment of human circadian rhythms to the solar photoperiod. Circadian desynchrony (CD) occurs when endogenous rhythms become misaligned with daily photoperiodic cycles, and this condition is facilitated by artificial lighting. This review examines the hypothesis that chronic CD that has accompanied the availability of electric lighting in the developed world induces a metabolic and behavioural phenotype that is predisposed to the development of obesity. The evidence to support this hypothesis is based on epidemiological data showing coincidence between the appearance of obesity and the availability of artificial light, both geographically, and historically. This association links CD to obesity in humans, and is corroborated by experimental studies that demonstrate that CD can induce obesity and metabolic dysfunction in humans and in rodents. This association between CD and obesity has far reaching implications for human health, lifestyle and work practices. Attention to the rhythmicity of daily sleep, exercise, work and feeding schedules could be beneficial in targeting or reversing the modern human predisposition to obesity.  
  Address Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3TZ, UK. c.wyse@abdn.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-9877 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21983352 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 837  
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Author (down) Wurtman, R.J.; Axelrod, J.; Phillips, L.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin Synthesis in thePineal Gland: Control by Light Type Journal Article
  Year 1963 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 142 Issue 3595 Pages 1071-1073  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 836  
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