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Author (up) Bhatti, P.; Mirick, D.K.; Davis, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Invited commentary: Shift work and cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 176 Issue 9 Pages 760-3; discussion 764-5  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Male; *Men's Health; Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Occupations/*statistics & numerical data; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/*statistics & numerical data  
  Abstract In this issue of the Journal, Parent et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(9):751-759) report significant associations between night-shift work and risk of cancer at several sites among men. These findings not only address the need for shift-work studies that evaluate cancers other than breast and prostate cancer but also support the increasing concern that the negative effects of shift work may be broadly applicable to risk of many cancers via the direct oncostatic properties of melatonin. Studies of shift work have been limited by a lack of detailed data for determining which aspects of this multifaceted exposure may be associated with increased cancer risk. Additionally, the influence of individual-level characteristics, such as preference for daytime activity versus nighttime activity or chronotype, has not been considered. In moving forward, launching new cohort studies of shift work and cancer risk is the most tenable approach, though it will be limited by the years of follow-up required in order to accrue adequate numbers of cancer cases. Studies incorporating biomarkers of effect are useful for providing immediate information that can aid not only in identifying the underlying mechanisms of the shift-work-cancer association but also in interpreting existing epidemiologic data and informing the design of future epidemiologic studies of cancer risk.  
  Address Program in Epidemiology, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. pbhatti@fhcrc.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23035018 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 507  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bierman, A.; Figueiro, M.G.; Rea, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measuring and predicting eyelid spectral transmittance Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Biomedical Optics Abbreviated Journal J Biomed Opt  
  Volume 16 Issue 6 Pages 067011  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Human Health  
  Abstract The purpose of the present study was to objectively quantify the spectral transmittance of the eyelid. Reported here are data acquired using a technique that was developed to provide practical and accurate measurements of eyelid transmittance across the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The empirical data were analyzed in terms of the absorption and scattering characteristics of the constituents of skin to develop a method for predicting eyelid transmission. Results showed that the eyelid has a much higher optical density at short wavelengths than previously published. The mean +/- standard deviation (s.d.) optical density of the eyelid from 450 to 650 nm was 2.1 +/- 0.3 with an optical density range among subjects of approximately 1.0. The study results indicate that skin pigmentation is poorly correlated with eyelid transmission; eyelid transmission is most affected by wavelength-independent macromolecules in the eyelid as well as its overall thickness.  
  Address Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Lighting Research Center, 21 Union Street, Troy, New York 12180, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1083-3668 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21721832 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1530  
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Author (up) Blask, D.; Brainard, G.; Gibbons, R.; Lockley, S.; Stevens, R.; Motta, M. openurl 
  Title Light Pollution: Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting. Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Report 4 of the Council on Science and Public Health, American Medical Association. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 508  
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Author (up) Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.; Dauchy, R.T.; Hanifin, J.P.; Davidson, L.K.; Krause, J.A.; Sauer, L.A.; Rivera-Bermudez, M.A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Jasser, S.A.; Lynch, D.T.; Rollag, M.D.; Zalatan, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin-depleted blood from premenopausal women exposed to light at night stimulates growth of human breast cancer xenografts in nude rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res  
  Volume 65 Issue 23 Pages 11174-11184  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*blood/genetics/pathology; Cell Growth Processes/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Humans; Light; Liver Neoplasms, Experimental/metabolism; Male; Melatonin/blood/*deficiency; Premenopause/blood; RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis/genetics; Rats; Rats, Nude; Receptors, Melatonin/biosynthesis/genetics; Transplantation, Heterologous  
  Abstract The increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers has been postulated to result from the suppression of pineal melatonin production by exposure to light at night. Exposure of rats bearing rat hepatomas or human breast cancer xenografts to increasing intensities of white fluorescent light during each 12-hour dark phase (0-345 microW/cm2) resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of nocturnal melatonin blood levels and a stimulation of tumor growth and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism to the mitogenic molecule 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid. Venous blood samples were collected from healthy, premenopausal female volunteers during either the daytime, nighttime, or nighttime following 90 minutes of ocular bright, white fluorescent light exposure at 580 microW/cm2 (i.e., 2,800 lx). Compared with tumors perfused with daytime-collected melatonin-deficient blood, human breast cancer xenografts and rat hepatomas perfused in situ, with nocturnal, physiologically melatonin-rich blood collected during the night, exhibited markedly suppressed proliferative activity and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism. Tumors perfused with melatonin-deficient blood collected following ocular exposure to light at night exhibited the daytime pattern of high tumor proliferative activity. These results are the first to show that the tumor growth response to exposure to light during darkness is intensity dependent and that the human nocturnal, circadian melatonin signal not only inhibits human breast cancer growth but that this effect is extinguished by short-term ocular exposure to bright, white light at night. These mechanistic studies are the first to provide a rational biological explanation for the increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers.  
  Address Laboratory of Chrono-Neuroendocrine Oncology, Bassett Research Institute, The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York 13326, USA. david.blask@bassett.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16322268 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 721  
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Author (up) Boivin, D.; James, F. openurl 
  Title Light treatment and circadian adaptation to shift work. Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Industrial Health Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 43 Issue Pages 34–48  
  Keywords Human Health  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1002  
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