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Author Contin, M.A.; Benedetto, M.M.; Quinteros-Quintana, M.L.; Guido, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution: the possible consequences of excessive illumination on retina Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; eye; visual system; light pollution; retina; Ophthalmology  
  Abstract Light is the visible part of the electromagnetic radiation within a range of 380-780 nm; (400-700 on primates retina). In vertebrates, the retina is adapted to capturing light photons and transmitting this information to other structures in the central nervous system. In mammals, light acts directly on the retina to fulfill two important roles: (1) the visual function through rod and cone photoreceptor cells and (2) non-image forming tasks, such as the synchronization of circadian rhythms to a 24 h solar cycle, pineal melatonin suppression and pupil light reflexes. However, the excess of illumination may cause retinal degeneration or accelerate genetic retinal diseases. In the last century human society has increased its exposure to artificial illumination, producing changes in the Light/Dark cycle, as well as in light wavelengths and intensities. Although, the consequences of unnatural illumination or light pollution have been underestimated by modern society in its way of life, light pollution may have a strong impact on people's health. The effects of artificial light sources could have direct consequences on retinal health. Constant exposure to different wavelengths and intensities of light promoted by light pollution may produce retinal degeneration as a consequence of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium cells death. In this review we summarize the different mechanisms of retinal damage related to the light exposure, which generates light pollution.Eye advance online publication, 6 November 2015; doi:10.1038/eye.2015.221.  
  Address Centro de Investigaciones en Quimica Biologica de Cordoba, (CIQUIBIC, UNC-CONICET), Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba, Argentina  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26541085 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1291  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fonken, L.K.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light exposure at night during development Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences Abbreviated Journal Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences  
  Volume 7 Issue (up) Pages 33-39  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Disruption of the circadian system is increasingly prevalent in modern society. The mammalian circadian architecture is functional from birth and continues to develop throughout the early postnatal period. Importantly, light is the most salient entraining signal for the circadian system. Early life experiences can profoundly affect the developing brain, influencing adult behavior, health, and disease; thus, the immature circadian system may be particularly sensitive to circadian disruption. Indeed, early lighting environment impacts the maturation of the circadian system. The consequences of early light experience persist into adulthood influencing physiological and behavioral functions that are regulated by the circadian system. This review will discuss the development of the mammalian circadian system and implications of disruptive light exposure during early critical periods.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2352-1546 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1292  
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Author Crowley, S.J.; Suh, C.; Molina, T.A.; Fogg, L.F.; Sharkey, K.M.; Carskadon, M.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Estimating the dim light melatonin onset of adolescents within a 6-h sampling window: the impact of sampling rate and threshold method Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine  
  Volume 20 Issue (up) Pages 59-66  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1324  
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Author Sliney, D.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is light? The visible spectrum and beyond Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; human vision; spectrum; electromagnetic spectrum; visible; *Ultraviolet Rays; light  
  Abstract In this International Year of Light, it is particularly appropriate to review the historical concept of what is light and the controversies surrounding the extent of the visible spectrum. Today we recognize that light possesses both a wave and particle nature. It is also clear that the limits of visibility really extend from about 310 nm in the ultraviolet (in youth) to about 1100 nm in the near-infrared, but depend very much on the radiance, that is, 'brightness' of the light source. The spectral content of artificial lighting are undergoing very significant changes in our lifetime, and the full biological implications of the spectral content of newer lighting technologies remain to be fully explored.  
  Address Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26768917 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1337  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kaneshi, Y.; Ohta, H.; Morioka, K.; Hayasaka, I.; Uzuki, Y.; Akimoto, T.; Moriichi, A.; Nakagawa, M.; Oishi, Y.; Wakamatsu, H.; Honma, N.; Suma, H.; Sakashita, R.; Tsujimura, S.-I.; Higuchi, S.; Shimokawara, M.; Cho, K.; Minakami, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of light exposure at nighttime on sleep development and body growth of preterm infants Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 6 Issue (up) Pages 21680  
  Keywords Health  
  Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that a light-dark cycle has promoted better sleep development and weight gain in preterm infants than constant light or constant darkness. However, it was unknown whether brief light exposure at night for medical treatment and nursing care would compromise the benefits brought about by such a light-dark cycle. To examine such possibility, we developed a special red LED light with a wavelength of >675 nm which preterm infants cannot perceive. Preterm infants born at <36 weeks' gestational age were randomly assigned for periodic exposure to either white or red LED light at night in a light-dark cycle after transfer from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to the Growing Care Unit, used for supporting infants as they mature. Activity, nighttime crying and body weight were continuously monitored from enrolment until discharge. No significant difference in rest-activity patterns, nighttime crying, or weight gain was observed between control and experimental groups. The data indicate that nursing care conducted at 3 to 4-hour intervals exposing infants to light for <15 minutes does not prevent the infants from developing circadian rest-activity patterns, or proper body growth as long as the infants are exposed to regular light-dark cycles.  
  Address Department of Obstetrics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15, W7, Kitaku, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26877166 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1358  
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