toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Peixoto, C.A.T.; da Silva, A.G.T.; Carskadon, M.A.; Louzada, F.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Adolescents living in homes without electric lighting have earlier sleep times Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication (up) Behavioral Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Behav Sleep Med  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 73-80  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep  
  Abstract The aim of this project was to compare circadian rhythmicity of a group of 37 adolescents (14 girls), aged 11 to 16 (mean age = 13.1 +/- 1.7 years), with and without electricity at home. Twenty students attended morning school (07:30-11:30), and 17 attended evening school classes (19:00-22:30). Eleven adolescents had no electric lighting at home (5 attended morning classes and 6 attended evening classes). They completed a sleep log and wore a wrist actigraph for 5 consecutive days. Saliva samples were collected to assess DLMO. Data were compared by ANOVA and showed later timing and a more extended sleep period for those who attended late classes. Those adolescents without electricity at home had significantly earlier sleep onset on school days. As to DLMO, a trend to a delay was observed in the groups who had electric lighting.  
  Address Department of Physiology, Universidade Federal do Parana, Brazil. pedatardelli@yahoo.com.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1540-2002 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19330580 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1481  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fonken, L.K.; Finy, M.S.; Walton, J.C.; Weil, Z.M.; Workman, J.L.; Ross, J.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of light at night on murine anxiety- and depressive-like responses Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication (up) Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 205 Issue 2 Pages 349-354  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Anxiety/*physiopathology; Corticosterone/blood; Depression/*physiopathology; Dietary Sucrose/administration & dosage; Drinking Behavior/physiology; Light/*adverse effects; Lighting; Locomotion/physiology; Male; Maze Learning; Mice; Neuropsychological Tests; Organ Size; Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Random Allocation; Swimming; Testis/pathology  
  Abstract Individuals are increasingly exposed to light at night. Exposure to constant light (LL) disrupts circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, body temperature, hormones, and the sleep-wake cycle in animals. Other behavioural responses to LL have been reported, but are inconsistent. The present experiment sought to determine whether LL produces changes in affective responses and whether behavioural changes are mediated by alterations in glucocorticoid concentrations. Relative to conspecifics maintained in a light/dark cycle (LD, 16:8 light/dark), male Swiss-Webster mice exposed to LL for three weeks increased depressive-like behavioural responses as evaluated by the forced swim test and sucrose anhedonia. Furthermore, providing a light escape tube reversed the effects of LL in the forced swim test. LL mice displayed reduced anxiety as evaluated by the open field and elevated-plus maze. Glucocorticoid concentrations were reduced in the LL group suggesting that the affective behavioural responses to LL are not the result of elevated corticosterone. Additionally, mice housed in LD with a clear tube displayed increased paired testes mass as compared to LL mice. Taken together, these data provide evidence that exposure to unnatural lighting can induce significant changes in affect, increasing depressive-like and decreasing anxiety-like responses.  
  Address Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19591880 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 749  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Souman, J.L.; Tinga, A.M.; Te Pas, S.F.; van Ee, R.; Vlaskamp, B.N.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acute alerting effects of light: a systematic literature review Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 337 Issue Pages 228-239  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Periodic, well timed exposure to light is important for our health and wellbeing. Light, in particular in the blue part of the spectrum, is thought to affect alertness both indirectly, by modifying circadian rhythms, and directly, giving rise to acute effects. We performed a systematic review of empirical studies on direct, acute effects of light on alertness to evaluate the reliability of these effects and to assess to what extent they depend on other factors, such as time of day, exposure duration and sleep pressure. In total, we identified 74 studies in which either light intensity, spectral distribution, or both were manipulated, and the effects on behavioral measures of alertness were evaluated, either subjectively or measured in performance tasks. The results show that increasing the intensity or the color temperature of polychromatic white light in general has been found to increase subjective ratings of alertness, though a substantial proportion of these studies failed to find significant effects. There is little evidence in the literature that these subjective alerting effects of light also translate into improvements on performance measures of alertness. For monochromatic or narrowband light exposure, some studies have shown improvement in reaction time tasks with exposure to blue light, but generally this was not accompanied by changes in subjective alertness. Thus, the alerting effects of light are far less clear than often suggested. We suggest that in future studies more attention should be paid to other factors that may influence the effects of light, such as chronotype, circadian phase, homeostatic state and prior light history.  
  Address Philips Research (Department Brain, Behavior & Cognition), Eindhoven, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28912014 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1727  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Scheuermaier, K.; Munch, M.; Ronda, J.M.; Duffy, J.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Improved cognitive morning performance in healthy older adults following blue-enriched light exposure on the previous evening Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 348 Issue Pages 267-275  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Exposure to light can have acute alerting and circadian phase-shifting effects. This study investigated the effects of evening exposure to blue-enriched polychromatic white (BEL) vs. polychromatic white light (WL) on sleep inertia dissipation the following morning in older adults. METHODS: Ten healthy older adults (average age=63.3 yrs; 6F) participated in a 13-day study comprising three baseline days, an initial circadian phase assessment, four days with 2-h evening light exposures, a post light exposure circadian phase assessment and three recovery days. Participants were randomized to either BEL or WL of the same irradiance for the four evening light exposures. On the next mornings at 2, 12, 22 and 32min after each wake time, the participants completed a 90-s digit-symbol substitution test (DSST) to assess working memory, and objective alertness was assessed using a wake EEG recording. DSST and power density from the wake EEG recordings were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: DSST performance improved with time awake (p<0.0001) and across study days in both light exposure groups (p<0.0001). There was no main effect of group, although we observed a significant day x group interaction (p=0.0004), whereby participants exposed to BEL performed significantly better on the first two mornings after light exposures than participants in WL (post-hoc, p<0.05). On those days, the BEL group showed higher EEG activity in some of the frequency bins in the sigma and beta range (p<0.05) on the wake EEG. CONCLUSION: Exposure to blue-enriched white light in the evening significantly improved DSST performance the following morning when compared to polychromatic white light. This was associated with a higher level of objective alertness on the wake EEG, but not with changes in sleep or circadian timing.  
  Address Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29684473 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1899  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jurić M., Gaiduk M., Seepold R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of Illuminance on Sleep Onset Latency in IoT Based Lighting System Environment. Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11495 Issue Pages 429-438  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The exposure to the light has a great influence on human beings in their everyday life. Various lighting sources produce light that reaches the human eye and influences a rhythmic release of melatonin hormone, that is a sleep promoting factor.

Since the development of new technologies provides more control over illuminance, this work uses an IoT based lighting system to set up dim and bright scenarios. A small study has been performed on the influence of illuminance on sleep latency. The system consists of different light bulbs, sensors and a central bridge which are interconnected like a mesh network. Also, a mobile app has been developed, that allows to adjust the lighting in various rooms. With the help of a ferro-electret sensor, like applied in sleep monitoring systems, a subject’s sleep was monitored. The sensor is placed below the mattress and it collects data, which is stored and processed in a cloud or in other alternative locations.

The research was conducted on healthy young subjects after being previously exposed to the preconfigured illuminance for at least three hours before bedtime. The results indicate correlation between sleep onset latency and exposure to different illuminance before bedtime. In a dimmed environment, the subject fell asleep in average 28% faster compared to the brighter environment.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2555  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: