toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author E Friedmann openurl 
  Title Menstrual and lunar cycles Type Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Am J Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 140 Issue 3 Pages 350  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1194  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author WB Cutler; WM Schleidt; E Friedmann; G Preti; R Stine openurl 
  Title Lunar influences on the reproductive cycle in women Type Journal Article
  Year 1987 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Hum Biol  
  Volume 59 Issue 6 Pages 959-72  
  Keywords Human Health, moonlight  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1195  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brainard, G.C.; Coyle, W.; Ayers, M.; Kemp, J.; Warfield, B.; Maida, J.; Bowen, C.; Bernecker, C.; Lockley, S.W.; Hanifin, J.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Solid-state lighting for the International Space Station: Tests of visual performance and melatonin regulation Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Acta Astronautica Abbreviated Journal Acta Astronautica  
  Volume 92 Issue 1 Pages 21-28  
  Keywords Human Health; Lighting  
  Abstract The International Space Station (ISS) uses General Luminaire Assemblies (GLAs) that house fluorescent lamps for illuminating the astronauts' working and living environments. Solid-state light emitting diodes (LEDs) are attractive candidates for replacing the GLAs on the ISS. The advantages of LEDs over conventional fluorescent light sources include lower up-mass, power consumption and heat generation, as well as fewer toxic materials, greater resistance to damage and long lamp life. A prototype Solid-State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) was developed and successfully installed on the ISS. The broad aim of the ongoing work is to test light emitted by prototype SSLAs for supporting astronaut vision and assessing neuroendocrine, circadian, neurobehavioral and sleep effects. Three completed ground-based studies are presented here including experiments on visual performance, color discrimination, and acute plasma melatonin suppression in cohorts of healthy, human subjects under different SSLA light exposure conditions within a high-fidelity replica of the ISS Crew Quarters (CQ). All visual tests were done under indirect daylight at 201 lx, fluorescent room light at 531 lx and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ at 1266 lx. Visual performance was assessed with numerical verification tests (NVT). NVT data show that there are no significant differences in score (F=0.73, p=0.48) or time (F=0.14, p=0.87) for subjects performing five contrast tests (10%–100%). Color discrimination was assessed with Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue tests (FM-100). The FM-100 data showed no significant differences (F=0.01, p=0.99) in color discrimination for indirect daylight, fluorescent room light and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ. Plasma melatonin suppression data show that there are significant differences (F=29.61, p<0.0001) across the percent change scores of plasma melatonin for five corneal irradiances, ranging from 0 to 405 &#956;W/cm2 of 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ (0–1270 lx). Risk factors for the health and safety of astronauts include disturbed circadian rhythms and altered sleep–wake patterns. These studies will help determine if SSLA lighting can be used both to support astronaut vision and serve as an in-flight countermeasure for circadian desynchrony, sleep disruption and cognitive performance deficits on the ISS.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0094-5765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1533  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Te Kulve, M.; Schellen, L.; Schlangen, L.J.; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The influence of light on thermal responses Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication (up) Acta Physiologica (Oxford, England) Abbreviated Journal Acta Physiol (Oxf)  
  Volume 216 Issue 2 Pages 163–185  
  Keywords Phsychology; Human Health  
  Abstract Light is essential for vision and plays an important role in non-visual responses, thus affecting alertness, mood and circadian rhythms. Furthermore, light influences physiological processes, such as thermoregulation, and therefore may be expected to play a role in thermal comfort as well. A systematic literature search was performed for human studies exploring the relation between ocular light exposure, thermophysiology and thermal comfort. Experimental results show that light in the evening can reduce melatonin secretion, delay the natural decline in core body temperature (CBT), and slow down the increase in distal skin temperature. In the morning though, bright light can result in a faster decline of melatonin levels, thus enabling a faster increase in CBT. Moreover the colour of light can affect temperature perception of the environment. Light with colour tones towards the red-end of the visual spectrum leads to a warmer perception compared to more bluish light tones. It should be noted however, that many results of light on thermal responses are inconclusive, and a theoretical framework is largely lacking. In conclusion, light is capable of evoking thermophysiological responses and visual input can alter perception of the thermal environment. Therefore lighting conditions should be taken in consideration during thermophysiological research and in the design of indoor climates. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Human Biology, NUTRIM, Maastricht University  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1748-1708 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26172218 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1208  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Muller, A.; Gal, N.; Betlehem, J.; Fuller, N.; Acs, P.; Kovacs, G.; Fusz, K.; Jozsa, R.; Olah, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Examination of the interaction of different lighting conditions and chronic mild stress in animal model Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication (up) Acta Physiologica Hungarica Abbreviated Journal Acta Physiologica Hungarica  
  Volume 102 Issue 3 Pages 301-310  
  Keywords animals; health  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0231-424X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1275  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: