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Author Padilla-Martinez, J.M.; Abad-Corpa, E.; Gea-Sanchez, M.; Casado-Ramirez, E.; Rol-de Lama, M.A.; Madrid-Perez, J.A.; Moreno-Casbas, M.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) “Detection of factors influencing circadian rhythms on Intensive Care inpatients and hospitalization: Protocol for an observational study” Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Advanced Nursing Abbreviated Journal J Adv Nurs  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; care; circadian rhythm; hospitalization; light; noise; nursing; nursing activities; protocol; sleep quality  
  Abstract AIMS: Identify the prevalence of circadian health disorders in ICU and hospitalized patients. Stablish the relationship of the circadian system with light, temperature, noise and nursing activities. BACKGROUND: Commonly, self-assessment through subjective questionnaires is used for research about sleep quality. However, more reliable and valid measures should be applied objectively to find out the real prevalence of the problem. There is a negative relationship between circadian rhythms and hospitalization. In this study, we will analyse sleep patterns and hospital environments to implement measures to improve the quality of care related to sleep. DESIGN: Descriptive observational study. It is estimated that 975 patients from 13 hospitals need to be recruited from ICU and hospitalization units. The sample should meet the following criteria: Patients over 18 admitted to ICU and medical units, length of stay between 96-148 hr, with no visual, hearing or moderate-severe cognitive impairment. Variables: Sleep variables are collected with an electronic device (named Kronowise(R) and Kronobed(R)), circadian and infrared light exposure, environmental noise, temperature, unit structural characteristics, nursing care (from 0 to 6 a.m.) and, characteristics of hospitalization period. The study, registered on Clinical Trials, initiated in December 2019 and it will continue up to December 2022. DISCUSSION: Using objective and subjective measures of sleep and circadian rhythms, this study will shed light on the factors that negatively affect the hospitalized patients' sleep quality and circadian health. The ultimate goal is to design hospital guidelines to minimize the adverse effects on the dependent variables studied. Arguably, these guidelines will contribute to reducing the risk of these alterations and it will also serve to improve the nursing activities. CONCLUSION: We expect to obtain adequate results for the creation of a protocol to improve the circadian health, quality of care and health outcomes related to sleep in patients.  
  Address Biomedical Research Center for Fragility and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0309-2402 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32996642 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3165  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mindel, J.W.; Rojas, S.L.; Kline, D.; Bao, S.; Rezai, A.; Corrigan, J.D.; Nelson, R.J.; D, P.; Magalang, U.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) 0038 Sleeping with Low Levels of Artificial Light at Night Increases Systemic Inflammation in Humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 42 Issue Supplement_1 Pages A15-A16  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Introduction

Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become a ubiquitous part of our society. Animal studies have shown that ALAN exposure promotes a depressive-like mood and increases peripheral inflammation likely due to circadian disruption. We hypothesized that sleeping with ALAN will increase systemic inflammation in humans.

Methods

We enrolled 64 subjects [32 with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) adherent to treatment and 32 without sleep disorders] in a randomized, crossover study to determine the effects of sleeping with ALAN (40 lux) or the usual dark condition (control) for 7 nights at home. Sleeping with ALAN was confirmed by an actigraph with an ambient light sensor. Outcome measurements were done at baseline and after sleeping in each condition. The primary outcome was changes in the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels. Secondary outcomes include scores on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-10 (FOSQ-10), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS); Psychomotor Vigilance Testing (PVT); actigraphic sleep measures; and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A random effects linear regression model was used to assess differences adjusting for schedule, visit, and baseline levels. Post-hoc analyses combined results from OSA and non-OSA subjects.

Results

Fifty-eight (30 OSA and 28 non-OSA) subjects, aged 38.4±14.9 years, 33 of whom are male completed the protocol. A log transformation was used so the difference in hsCRP was expressed as a mean ratio. In the combined analysis, the mean hsCRP was 39% higher with ALAN than control (mean ratio=1.39; 95% CI: 1.08-1.80; p=0.012). The effects of ALAN for OSA and non-OSA subjects were not different. ALAN increased the CES-D score by 1.81 (p=0.017) and ESS score by 0.62 (p=0.071) points, and decreased the FOSQ-10 score by 0.36 (p=0.038) points while the PSQI score was unchanged (p=0.860). There were no significant differences in the PVT values, actigraphic sleep measures, or HOMA-IR.

Conclusion

Sleeping with ALAN for seven days significantly increased hsCRP levels and modestly increased depression scores in humans.
 
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2322  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bauer, S.E.; Wagner, S.E.; Burch, J.; Bayakly, R.; Vena, J.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A case-referent study: light at night and breast cancer risk in Georgia Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Health Geographics Abbreviated Journal Int J Health Geogr  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 23  
  Keywords Human Health; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Georgia/epidemiology; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Registries; Risk Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Literature has identified detrimental health effects from the indiscriminate use of artificial nighttime light. We examined the co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and breast cancer (BC) incidence in Georgia, with the goal to contribute to the accumulating evidence that exposure to LAN increases risk of BC. METHODS: Using Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry data (2000-2007), we conducted a case-referent study among 34,053 BC cases and 14,458 lung cancer referents. Individuals with lung cancer were used as referents to control for other cancer risk factors that may be associated with elevated LAN, such as air pollution, and since this cancer type was not previously associated with LAN or circadian rhythm disruption. DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Time Series satellite images (1992-2007) were used to estimate LAN levels; low (0-20 watts per sterradian cm(2)), medium (21-41 watts per sterradian cm(2)), high (>41 watts per sterradian cm(2)). LAN levels were extracted for each year of exposure prior to case/referent diagnosis in ArcGIS. RESULTS: Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models controlling for individual-level year of diagnosis, race, age at diagnosis, tumor grade, stage; and population-level determinants including metropolitan statistical area (MSA) status, births per 1,000 women aged 15-50, percentage of female smokers, MSA population mobility, and percentage of population over 16 in the labor force. We found that overall BC incidence was associated with high LAN exposure (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.04, 1.20]). When stratified by race, LAN exposure was associated with increased BC risk among whites (OR = 1.13, 95% CI [1.05, 1.22]), but not among blacks (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [0.82, 1.28]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest positive associations between LAN and BC incidence, especially among whites. The consistency of our findings with previous studies suggests that there could be fundamental biological links between exposure to artificial LAN and increased BC incidence, although additional research using exposure metrics at the individual level is required to confirm or refute these findings.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. secbauer@ufl.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1476-072X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23594790; PMCID:PMC3651306 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 718  
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Author An, K.; Zhao, H.; Miao, Y.; Xu, Q.; Li, Y.-F.; Ma, Y.-Q.; Shi, Y.-M.; Shen, J.-W.; Meng, J.-J.; Yao, Y.-G.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, J.-T.; Bao, J.; Zhang, M.; Xue, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A circadian rhythm-gated subcortical pathway for nighttime-light-induced depressive-like behaviors in mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Nature Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Besides generating vision, light modulates various physiological functions, including mood. While light therapy applied in the daytime is known to have anti-depressive properties, excessive light exposure at night has been reportedly associated with depressive symptoms. The neural mechanisms underlying this day-night difference in the effects of light are unknown. Using a light-at-night (LAN) paradigm in mice, we showed that LAN induced depressive-like behaviors without disturbing the circadian rhythm. This effect was mediated by a neural pathway from retinal melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells to the dorsal perihabenular nucleus (dpHb) to the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Importantly, the dpHb was gated by the circadian rhythm, being more excitable at night than during the day. This indicates that the ipRGC-->dpHb-->NAc pathway preferentially conducts light signals at night, thereby mediating LAN-induced depressive-like behaviors. These findings may be relevant when considering the mental health effects of the prevalent nighttime illumination in the industrial world.  
  Address Institute for Stem Cell and Regeneration, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. xuetian@ustc.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1097-6256 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32483349 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2978  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Walch, O.J.; Cochran, A.; Forger, D.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A global quantification of “normal” sleep schedules using smartphone data Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Science Advances  
  Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages e1501705-e1501705  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep; *Circadian Rhythm; smartphone; society  
  Abstract The influence of the circadian clock on sleep scheduling has been studied extensively in the laboratory; however, the effects of society on sleep remain largely unquantified. We show how a smartphone app that we have developed, ENTRAIN, accurately collects data on sleep habits around the world. Through mathematical modeling and statistics, we find that social pressures weaken and/or conceal biological drives in the evening, leading individuals to delay their bedtime and shorten their sleep. A country’s average bedtime, but not average wake time, predicts sleep duration. We further show that mathematical models based on controlled laboratory experiments predict qualitative trends in sunrise, sunset, and light level; however, these effects are attenuated in the real world around bedtime. Additionally, we find that women schedule more sleep than men and that users reporting that they are typically exposed to outdoor light go to sleep earlier and sleep more than those reporting indoor light. Finally, we find that age is the primary determinant of sleep timing, and that age plays an important role in the variability of population-level sleep habits. This work better defines and personalizes “normal” sleep, produces hypotheses for future testing in the laboratory, and suggests important ways to counteract the global sleep crisis.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1440  
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