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Author Peixoto, C.A.T.; da Silva, A.G.T.; Carskadon, M.A.; Louzada, F.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Adolescents living in homes without electric lighting have earlier sleep times Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Behavioral Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Behav Sleep Med  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 73-80  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep  
  Abstract The aim of this project was to compare circadian rhythmicity of a group of 37 adolescents (14 girls), aged 11 to 16 (mean age = 13.1 +/- 1.7 years), with and without electricity at home. Twenty students attended morning school (07:30-11:30), and 17 attended evening school classes (19:00-22:30). Eleven adolescents had no electric lighting at home (5 attended morning classes and 6 attended evening classes). They completed a sleep log and wore a wrist actigraph for 5 consecutive days. Saliva samples were collected to assess DLMO. Data were compared by ANOVA and showed later timing and a more extended sleep period for those who attended late classes. Those adolescents without electricity at home had significantly earlier sleep onset on school days. As to DLMO, a trend to a delay was observed in the groups who had electric lighting.  
  Address Department of Physiology, Universidade Federal do Parana, Brazil. pedatardelli@yahoo.com.br  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1540-2002 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19330580 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1481  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Adverse health effects of nighttime lighting: comments on American Medical Association policy statement Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication American Journal of Preventive Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Prev Med  
  Volume 45 Issue 3 Pages 343-346  
  Keywords American Medical Association; Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; DNA Damage/physiology; *Health Policy; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; United States  
  Abstract The American Medical Association House of Delegates in June of 2012 adopted a policy statement on nighttime lighting and human health. This major policy statement summarizes the scientific evidence that nighttime electric light can disrupt circadian rhythms in humans and documents the rapidly advancing understanding from basic science of how disruption of circadian rhythmicity affects aspects of physiology with direct links to human health, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and metabolism. The human evidence is also accumulating, with the strongest epidemiologic support for a link of circadian disruption from light at night to breast cancer. There are practical implications of the basic and epidemiologic science in the form of advancing lighting technologies that better accommodate human circadian rhythmicity.  
  Address University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0749-3797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23953362 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 130  
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Author Bercz, P.A.; Jaffe, F. url  openurl
  Title (up) Adverse health effects of shift work and shift work sleep disorder Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Dialogue and Diagnosis Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages 13-20  
  Keywords Human Health  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 506  
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Author Aschoff, J. openurl 
  Title (up) Aktivitätsmuster der Tagesperiodik Type Journal Article
  Year 1957 Publication Die Naturwissenschaften Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 44 Issue 13 Pages 361-367  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 709  
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Ambient Light Exposure and Changes in Obesity Parameters: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJO-KYO Cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume Issue Pages jc20154123  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Previous epidemiological studies have suggested an association between nighttime light levels and the prevalence of obesity, although evidence is limited to cross-sectional studies. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the longitudinal association between ambient light exposure and the subsequent changes in obesity parameters. DESIGN AND PARTCIPANTS: Data from 1,110 elderly participants at baseline (mean age, 71.9 years) and data from 766 at follow-up (median, 21 months) were included in this prospective population-based study. MEASURES: Time-dependent ambient light exposure based on objective measurements and changes in the waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. RESULTS: Multivariable mixed-effect linear regression models showed a significant association between light exposure and the %WHtR gain; this was independent of potential confounders (e.g., caloric intake, physical activity, and sleep/wake parameters). Nighttime or evening exposure to higher light intensity was significantly associated with subsequent %WHtR gain. Morning exposure to a longer time >/=500 lux or nighttime exposure to a longer time <3 lux was significantly associated with subsequent %WHtR loss. These association trends were nearly consistent when the BMI was used as an obesity parameter. Increased nighttime light exposure (mean >/=3 vs. <3 lux) was estimated to correspond to a 10.2% WHtR gain and 10.0% increase in BMI over 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: Ambient light exposure, such as increased nighttime or evening light exposure and decreased morning light exposure, was independently associated with subsequent increases in obesity parameters. Further interventional studies are warranted to establish an optimal controlled lighting environment as a preventive option against obesity.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27383113 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1483  
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