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Author Obayashi, K.; Yamagami, Y.; Kurumatani, N.; Saeki, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Bedroom lighting environment and incident diabetes mellitus: a longitudinal study of the HEIJO-KYO cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine  
  Volume 65 Issue Pages 1-3  
  Keywords Human Health; Metabolic disorders; diabetes; geriatrics  
  Abstract Objectives

Light information received by the brain influences human circadian timing and metabolism; low-level light at night (LAN) significantly increased body mass and led to prediabetes in mice. We hypothesized that LAN exposure increases the diabetes risk in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a longitudinal association between LAN exposure and the incidence of diabetes in a general population.

Methods

In our prospective cohort study, bedroom light intensity was measured at 1-min intervals in 678 elderly participants without diabetes at baseline. The average light intensity recorded between bedtimes and rise times over two consecutive nights was used in the analysis.

Results

During follow-up (median, 42 months), 19 of the 678 participants (mean age, 70.6 years) developed diabetes. Poisson regression models revealed that the incidence rate for diabetes was significantly higher in the LAN group (average ≥5 lux, N = 128) than the dark group (average <5 lux, N = 550) (incidence rate ratio, 3.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.55–9.05; p=0.003). Further propensity score adjustments in relation to LAN produced consistent results (incidence rate ratio, 3.19; 95% CI, 1.38–7.35; p=0.007). When the cut-off value of LAN was decreased to 3 lux, the relationship remained significant (incidence rate ratio 2.74; 95% CI, 1.19–6.33; p=0.018).

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that LAN exposure increases the incidence of diabetes in a general elderly population. Further research involving a large cohort with new-onset diabetes is warranted to elucidate these findings.
 
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara, 634-8521, Japan; obayashi(at)naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2605  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Akacem, L.D.; Wright, K.P.J.; LeBourgeois, M.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Bedtime and evening light exposure influence circadian timing in preschool-age children: A field study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms Abbreviated Journal Neurobiol Sleep Circadian Rhythms  
  Volume 1 Issue 2 Pages 27-31  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Light exposure and sleep timing are two factors that influence inter-individual variability in the timing of the human circadian clock. The aim of this study was to quantify the degree to which evening light exposure predicts variance in circadian timing over and above bedtime alone in preschool children. Participants were 21 children ages 4.5-5.0 years (4.7 +/- 0.2 years; 9 females). Children followed their typical sleep schedules for 4 days during which time they wore a wrist actigraph to assess sleep timing and a pendant light meter to measure minute-by-minute illuminance levels in lux. On the 5th day, children participated in an in-home dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) assessment. Light exposure in the 2 h before bedtime was averaged and aggregated across the 4 nights preceding the DLMO assessment. Mean DLMO and bedtime were 19:22 +/- 01:04 and 20:07 +/- 00:46, respectively. Average evening light exposure was 710.1 +/- 1418.2 lux. Children with later bedtimes (lights-off time) had more delayed melatonin onset times (r=0.61, p=0.002). Evening light exposure was not independently associated with DLMO (r=0.32, p=0.08); however, a partial correlation between evening light exposure and DLMO when controlling for bedtime yielded a positive correlation (r=0.46, p=0.02). Bedtime explained 37.3% of the variance in the timing of DLMO, and evening light exposure accounted for an additional 13.3% of the variance. These findings represent an important step in understanding factors that influence circadian phase in preschool-age children and have implications for understanding a modifiable pathway that may underlie late sleep timing and the development of evening settling problems in early childhood.  
  Address Sleep and Development Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2451-9944 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28042611; PMCID:PMC5193478 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1755  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Spitschan, M.; Cajochen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Binocular facilitation in light-mediated melatonin suppression? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages e12602  
  Keywords Human Health; Vision; melatonin suppression; monocular; binocular  
  Abstract Astronomers and pilots have known for a long time that closing one eye can preserve vision in that eye while going from dark to light and back. Recently, it was reported that viewing a smartphone monocularly in an otherwise dark room can lead to transient, but strong reductions in retinal sensitivity in that eye (Alim-Marvasti, Bi, Mahroo, Barbur, & Plant, 2016). But seeing detail is not the only function that is mediated by the retina. Here, we address the question whether light exposure to one eye only (monocular) has tangible effects on the suppression of melatonin by light, relative to both eyes open (binocular).  
  Address Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31361918 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2595  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Haus, E.; Smolensky, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Biological clocks and shift work: circadian dysregulation and potential long-term effects Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 489-500  
  Keywords Human Health; Adaptation, Physiological; Animals; Biological Clocks; Cardiovascular Abnormalities/etiology; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/physiopathology; Chronobiology Phenomena; Humans; Neoplasms/etiology; Occupational Diseases/*etiology; Risk Factors; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiopathology; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract Long-term epidemiologic studies on large numbers of night and rotating shift workers have suggested an increase in the incidence of breast and colon cancer in these populations. These studies suffer from poor definition and quantification of the work schedules of the exposed subjects. Against this background, the pathophysiology of phase shift and phase adaptation is reviewed. A phase shift as experienced in night and rotating shift work involves desynchronization at the molecular level in the circadian oscillators in the central nervous tissue and in most peripheral tissues of the body. There is a change in the coordination between oscillators with transient loss of control by the master-oscillator (the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus, SCN) in the hypothalamus. The implications of the pathophysiology of phase shift are discussed for long-term health effects and for the design of ergonomic work schedules minimizing the adverse health effects upon the worker.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, University of Minnesota, Health Partners Medical Group, Regions Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota 55101, USA. Erhard.X.Haus@Healthpartners.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16596302 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 760  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mortazavi, S.A.R., Parhoodeh, S., Hosseini, M.A., Arabi, H., Malakooti, H., Nematollahi, S., Mortazavi, G., Darvish, L., Mortazavi, S.M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Blocking Short-Wavelength Component of the Visible Light Emitted by Smartphones’ Screens Improves Human Sleep Quality Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biomedical Physics and Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 375-380  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background: It has been shown that short-wavelength blue component of the visible light spectrum can alter the circadian rhythm and suppress the level of melatonin hormone. The short-wavelength light emitted by smartphones’ screens can affect the sleep quality of the people who use these devices at night through suppression of melatonin.

Objectives: In this study, we examined the effects of covering the screens of smartphones with different filters (changing the effective wavelength of the light) on sleep delay time in 43 healthy students.

Materials and Methods: Volunteer students were asked to go to bed at 23:00 and to use their mobile phones in bed for watching a natural life documentary movie for 60 minutes. No filter was used for one night while amber and blue filters were used for other 2 nights. Photospectrometry method was used to determine the output spectrum of the light passing through the filters used for covering the screens of the mobile phones. The order for utilizing amber or blue filters or using no filter was selected randomly. After 1 hour, the participants were asked to record their sleep delay time measured by a modified form of sleep time record sheet.

Results: The mean sleep delay time for the “no-filter” night was 20.84±9.15 minutes, while the sleep delay times for the nights with amber and blue filters were 15.26±1.04 and 26.33±1.59 minutes, respectively.

Conclusion: The findings obtained in this study support this hypothesis that blue light possibly suppresses the secretion of melatonin more than the longer wavelengths of the visible light spectrum. Using amber filter in this study significantly improved the sleep quality. Altogether, these findings lead us to this conclusion that blocking the short-wavelength component of the light emitted by smartphones’ screens improves human sleep.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2077  
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