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Author Fasciani, I.; Petragnano, F.; Aloisi, G.; Marampon, F.; Rossi, M.; Francesca Coppolino, M.; Rossi, R.; Longoni, B.; Scarselli, M.; Maggio, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A new threat to dopamine neurons: the downside of artificial light Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Review; Human Health; Parkinson's disease; artificial light; dopamine neurons; melatonin; opsins; photoactivation  
  Abstract Growing awareness of adverse impacts of artificial light on human health has led to recognize light pollution as a significant global environmental issue. Despite, a large number of studies in rodent and monkey models of Parkinson's disease have reported that near infrared light has neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons, recent findings have shown that prolonged exposure of rodents and birds to fluorescent artificial light results in an increase of neuromelanin granules in substantia nigra and loss of dopaminergic neurons. The observed detrimental effect seems to be dependent on a direct effect of light on the substantia nigra rather than a secondary effect of the alterations of circadian rhythms. Moreover, inferences from animal models to human studies have shown a positive correlation between the prevalence of Parkinson's disease and light pollution. The present article discusses experimental evidence supporting a potentially deleterious impact of light on dopaminergic neurons and highlights the mechanisms whereby light might damage neuronal tissue. Moreover, it analyses epidemiological evidence that suggests light pollution to be an environmental risk factor for Parkinson's disease.  
  Address Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy. Electronic address: roberto.maggio@univaq.it  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32142863 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2839  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Provencio, I.; Rodriguez, I.R.; Jiang, G.; Hayes, W.P.; Moreira, E.F.; Rollag, M.D. url  openurl
  Title (up) A Novel Human Opsin in the Inner Retina. Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 600-605  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Here we report the identification of a novel human opsin, melanopsin, that is expressed in cells of the mammalian inner retina. The human melanopsin gene consists of 10 exons and is mapped to chromosome 10q22. This chromosomal localization and gene structure differs significantly from that of other human opsins that typically have four to seven exons. A survey of 26 anatomical sites indicates that, in humans, melanopsin is expressed only in the eye. In situ hybridization histochemistry shows that melanopsin expression is restricted to cells within the ganglion and amacrine cell layers of the primate and murine retinas. Notably, expression is not observed in retinal photoreceptor cells, the opsin-containing cells of the outer retina that initiate vision. The unique inner retinal localization of melanopsin suggests that it is not involved in image formation but rather may mediate nonvisual photoreceptive tasks, such as the regulation of circadian rhythms and the acute suppression of pineal melatonin. The anatomical distribution of melanopsin-positive retinal cells is similar to the pattern of cells known to project from the retina to the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus, a primary circadian pacemaker.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 530  
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Author Phelps, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A powerful non-pharmacologic treatment for mania – virtually Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Bipolar Disorders Abbreviated Journal Bipolar Disord  
  Volume 18 Issue 4 Pages 379-382  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address Samaritan Mental Health, Corvallis, OR, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1398-5647 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27218661 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1511  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ticleanu, C.; Littlefair, P. url  openurl
  Title (up) A summary of LED lighting impacts on health Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Sustainable Lighting  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 5-11  
  Keywords Human health; light and health; LED glare; LED flicker; melatonin supression; LED skin exposure  
  Abstract Lighting can affect the health of people in buildings. This goes beyond the safety aspects of providing enough illumination to see by; lighting affects mood and human circadian rhythms, while poor lighting can cause glare, headaches, eyestrain, aches and pains associated with poor body posture or, in extreme cases, skin conditions and various types of sight loss. These aspects ought to be considered by designers and building owners and occupiers in order to improve the lit environment and use adequate lighting and lighting controls that meet the recommendations of codes and standards. Various types of lighting can have different impacts depending on their spectral, optical and electrical characteristics. This paper discusses potential impacts of LED lighting on human health, and is based on a recent BRE review of research investigating the most typical effects of lighting on human health.  
  Address Building Research Establishment (BRE), Bucknalls Lane, Watford WD25 9XX UK; Cosmin.Ticleanu(at)bre.co.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1454-5837 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1389  
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Author Dautovich, N.D.; Schreiber, D.R.; Imel, J.L.; Tighe, C.A.; Shoji, K.D.; Cyrus, J.; Bryant, N.; Lisech, A.; O'Brien, C.; Dzierzewski, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A systematic review of the amount and timing of light in association with objective and subjective sleep outcomes in community-dwelling adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Health Abbreviated Journal Sleep Health  
  Volume 5 Issue 1 Pages 31–48  
  Keywords Human Health; Review; light timing; Sleep  
  Abstract Light is considered the dominant environmental cue, or zeitgeber, influencing the sleep-wake cycle. Despite recognizing the importance of light for our well-being, less is known about the specific conditions under which light is optimally associated with better sleep. Therefore, a systematic review was conducted to examine the association between the amount and timing of light exposure in relation to sleep outcomes in healthy, community-dwelling adults. A systematic search was conducted of four databases from database inception to June 2016. In total, 45 studies met the review eligibility criteria with generally high study quality excepting for the specification of eligibility criteria and the justification of sample size. The majority of studies involved experimental manipulation of light (n = 32) vs observational designs (n = 13). Broad trends emerged suggesting that (1) bright light (>1000 lux) has positive implications for objectively assessed sleep outcomes compared to dim (<100 lux) and moderate light (100-1000 lux) and (2) bright light (>1000 lux) has positive implications for subjectively assessed sleep outcomes compared to moderate light (100-1000 lux). Effects due to the amount of light are moderated by the timing of light exposure such that, for objectively assessed sleep outcomes, brighter morning and evening light exposure are consistent with a shift in the timing of the sleep period to earlier and later in the day, respectively. For subjectively assessed sleep outcomes, brighter light delivered in the morning was associated with self-reported sleep improvements and brighter evening light exposure was associated with worse self-reported sleep.  
  Address Psychology Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, 800 W Franklin St, Room 203, PO Box 842018, Richmond, VA 23284-2018 USA; ndautovich(at)vcu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher National Sleep Foundation Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2352-7218 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2050  
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