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Author Lai, K.Y.; Sarkar, C.; Ni, M.Y.; Gallacher, J.; Webster, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night (LAN) and risk of obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environmental Research  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background

There is emerging evidence of the association between light at night (LAN) exposure and weight gain.

Objective

We aim to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies on the association between LAN exposure and risk of obesity in human subjects.

Methods

Peer-reviewed observational studies were systematically searched from MEDLINE (EBSCO), Academic Search Complete (EBSCO), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO) and PubMed up to 24 December 2019. Random-effects models were developed to estimate the associations between LAN exposure and weight-related outcomes of overweight and obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-hip-ratio and waist-to-height-ratio. The I2 statistic was used to assess the degree of heterogeneity across studies. The National Toxicology Program’s Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) risk of bias rating tool and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) guideline were respectively employed to assess the risk of bias and to appraise the quality of the generated evidence.

Results

A total of 12 studies (three with longitudinal and nine of cross-sectional design) published between 2003-2019 were included for systematic review, while seven of them fulfilling the inclusion/exclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. A higher LAN exposure was significantly associated with 13% higher odds of overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2) (Summary Odds Ratio; SOR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.10-1.16) with low heterogeneity (I2 = 27.27%), and 22% higher odds of obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2) (SOR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.07-1.38) with substantial heterogeneity (I2 = 85.96%). Stratifying analyses by the levels of measurement of LAN exposures (macro-, meso- and micro-levels) and time of LAN measurement (including before and while sleeping) consistently produced robust estimates, with higher exposure to LAN being positively associated with poorer weight outcomes. Assessment of risk of bias identified substantial detection bias for exposure, with over half of the pooled studies employing subjective LAN measures. The overall evidence of the association between LAN exposure and risk of obesity was rated as ‘moderate’ as per the GRADE guideline.

Conclusions

Exposure to LAN was reported to be a significant risk factor for overweight and obesity. Prospectively designed future studies with objectively measured multi-level LAN exposures and weight outcomes are required.
 
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2916  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jurić M., Gaiduk M., Seepold R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of Illuminance on Sleep Onset Latency in IoT Based Lighting System Environment. Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11495 Issue Pages 429-438  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The exposure to the light has a great influence on human beings in their everyday life. Various lighting sources produce light that reaches the human eye and influences a rhythmic release of melatonin hormone, that is a sleep promoting factor.

Since the development of new technologies provides more control over illuminance, this work uses an IoT based lighting system to set up dim and bright scenarios. A small study has been performed on the influence of illuminance on sleep latency. The system consists of different light bulbs, sensors and a central bridge which are interconnected like a mesh network. Also, a mobile app has been developed, that allows to adjust the lighting in various rooms. With the help of a ferro-electret sensor, like applied in sleep monitoring systems, a subject’s sleep was monitored. The sensor is placed below the mattress and it collects data, which is stored and processed in a cloud or in other alternative locations.

The research was conducted on healthy young subjects after being previously exposed to the preconfigured illuminance for at least three hours before bedtime. The results indicate correlation between sleep onset latency and exposure to different illuminance before bedtime. In a dimmed environment, the subject fell asleep in average 28% faster compared to the brighter environment.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2555  
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Author Woods, H. C., & Scott, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Merging the Biological and Cognitive Processes of Sleep and Screens Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Current Sleep Medicine Reports Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 150-155  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose of Review

Screens are a permanent feature of life today and we have reached an interesting juncture with different research agendas investigating the biological and cognitive aspects of screen use separately. This review argues that it is timely and indeed essential that we bring together these research areas to fully understand both positive and negative aspects of screen use.

Recent Findings

More recent work is starting to take a more cohesive approach to understanding how device use pre-bedtime can impact our sleep by including both light and content in their experimental protocols which is a welcome development leading to a more nuanced understanding of both biological and cognitive processes.

Summary

We call for an open and collaborative approach to gain momentum in this direction of acknowledging both biological and cognitive factors enabling us to understand the relative impacts of both whilst using screens with regard to both light and content.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2640  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Figueiro, M.G.; Nagare, R.; Price, L.L.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Non-visual effects of light: How to use light to promote circadian entrainment and elicit alertness Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 38-62  
  Keywords Human Health; Lighting  
  Abstract In addition to stimulating the visual system, light incident on the retina stimulates other biological functions, also referred to as non-visual responses. Among the most notable biological functions are human circadian rhythms, which are bodily rhythms that, in constant darkness, oscillate with a period close to, but typically slightly longer than 24 hours. Twenty-four-hour light–dark patterns incident on the retina are the major synchroniser of circadian rhythms to the local time on Earth. Entrainment of circadian rhythms has been implicated in health and well-being. Light can also elicit an acute alerting effect on people, similar to a ‘cup of coffee.’ This review summarises the literature on how light affects entrainment and alertness and how it can be used to achieve these aims.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3133  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Suh, Y.-W.; Na, K.-H.; Ahn, S.-E.; Oh, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Ambient Light Exposure on Ocular Fatigue during Sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Korean Medical Science Abbreviated Journal J Korean Med Sci  
  Volume 33 Issue 38 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background

To investigate the influence of nocturnal ambient light on visual function and ocular fatigue.

Methods

Sixty healthy subjects (30 males and 30 females) aged 19 through 29 years with no history of ocular disease were recruited. All subjects spent 3 consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. During the first and second nights, the subjects were not exposed to light during sleep, but during the third night, they were exposed to ambient light, measuring 5 or 10 lux at the eye level, which was randomly allocated with 30 subjects each. The visual function and ocular fatigue were assessed at 7 a.m. on the 3rd and 4th mornings, using best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, conjunctival hyperemia, tear break-up time, maximal blinking interval, ocular surface temperature, and subjective symptoms reported on a questionnaire.

Results

Three male and three female subjects failed to complete the study (4 in the 5 lux; 2 from the 10 lux). For the entire 54 subjects, tear break-up time and maximal blinking interval decreased (P = 0.015; 0.010, respectively), and nasal and temporal conjunctival hyperemia increased significantly after sleep under any ambient light (P < 0.001; 0.021, respectively). Eye tiredness and soreness also increased (P = 0.004; 0.024, respectively). After sleep under 5 lux light, only nasal conjunctival hyperemia increased significantly (P = 0.008). After sleep under 10 lux light, nasal and temporal conjunctival hyperemia, eye tiredness, soreness, difficulty in focusing, and ocular discomfort increased significantly (P < 0.05).

Conclusion

Nocturnal ambient light exposure increases ocular fatigue. Avoiding ambient light during sleep could be recommended to prevent ocular fatigue.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1011-8934 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1991  
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