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Author Factors Influencing Quality of Sleep among Critically Ill Patients in Selected Hospitals in Western Kenya url  openurl
  Title Factors Influencing Quality of Sleep among Critically Ill Patients in Selected Hospitals in Western Kenya Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Health, Medicine and Nursing Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 56 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Sleep is essential for rest, repair, well-being, and survival of the patient. Sleep quality varies in critically ill patients and is measured by patient's satisfaction of the sleep experience, integrating aspects of sleep initiation, sleep maintenance, quantity of sleep and the refreshment upon awakening. Altered sleep is a common problem experienced by patients in critical care units. This alterations may lead to physiological and psychological dysfunctions that may affect recovery. Critically ill patients frequently experience poor sleep, characterized by frequent disruptions and loss of circadian rhythms. This study investigated factors influencing the quality of sleep among critically ill patients in hospitals in Western Kenya. A cross-sectional descriptive research design was used to examine these factors. A total of 142 patients above 18 years who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and those transferred from the ICU to the general ward during the study period were conveniently selected for participation in the study. For triangulation, 10 nurses who worked in the ICU also participated in the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from patients while a checklist was used to observe nursing interventions. Descriptive statistical techniques used were frequencies and percentages, while chi-square was used with the p-value set at 0.05 to test the association between factors and quality of sleep. The study results showed that frequent, nursing care activities 96.5% (n=137) noise from ventilator alarms 83.1% (n=118), feeling thirsty 57.7% (n= 82) and pain 52.8% (n=75) were among the major factors influencing the quality of sleep in ICU. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed patient factors significantly associated with quality sleep were age p=.006 and marital status p=.02, environmental factors significantly affecting sleep were presence of light at night with a p <0.0001 and noise from alarms p=.01. Physiological factors included feeling of thirst and hunger (p=0.03). This study recommends optimal use of analgesics and sedatives for pain management, adequate fluid replacement and hydration, noise reduction strategies, including minimizing monitor and ventilator alarms, reducing staff and telephone conversations and use of ear plugs for patients in ICU. Further, nurses should implement clustered procedures to reduce disruption of sleep among critically ill patients.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2974  
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Author Malik, N.; Raj, A.; Dhasmana, R.; Bahadur, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Late Night Studying and Excessive Use of Video Display Terminals on the Ocular Health of Medical Undergraduate Students in A Tertiary Care Hospital Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Exp Ophthalmol  
  Volume 09 Issue 06 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the effect of late night study and excessive use of smart phones on the ocular health of medical undergraduate students.

Design: An observational and cross-sectional study.

Participants: Two hundred and fifty nine normal and healthy M.B.B.S students of age 18-25 y were included in the study over a period of two months.

Methods: All the volunteers underwent an interview in form of a questionnaire. A complete ophthalmic examination was done including snellen visual acuity assessment, anterior segment examination with slit lamp, posterior segment with direct or indirect ophthalmoscopy; Schirmer’s test and tear film break up time.

Results: A total of 259 subjects were included in the study and maximum subjects 160 (61.8%) were females. According to age, the students were divided in two groups as I and II with age of 17-20 y and 21-23 y respectively. Maximum 195 (75.3%) students belonged to group I. Maximum subjects 245 (94.5%) were using only smartphones and 239 (92.27%) subjects were using smartphones for more than 2 y. The maximum 136 (52.51%) students studied at night with maximum using tube light 112 (43.24%). A significant association was seen between the digital device used and age of the subject (p value=0.01). Number of symptoms experienced by the students showed significant relationship with the number of hours of smartphone usage (p value=0.02). Source of light in which the students studied at night was significantly associated with the number of symptoms experienced (p value=0.03). An association between usage of smartphones (hours) showed significant relationship with slit lamp examination (tear debri) and Schirmer’s (less than 15 mm) with p value of 0.03, 0.05 respectively.

Conclusion: Source of light used to study at night and number of hours of use of devices shows relationship with symptoms. Smart phone users showed computer-related eye problems in more than half of the subjects.
 
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  ISSN 2155-9570 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2197  
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Author Nicholls, S. K., Casiraghi, L. P., Wang. W., Weber, E. T., & Harrington, M. E. url  openurl
  Title Evidence for Internal Desynchrony Caused by Circadian Clock Resetting Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 259-270  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Circadian disruption has been linked to markers for poor health outcomes in humans and animal models. What is it about circadian disruption that is problematic? One hypothesis is that phase resetting of the circadian system, which occurs in response to changes in environmental timing cues, leads to internal desynchrony within the organism. Internal desynchrony is understood as acute changes in phase relationships between biological rhythms from different cell groups, tissues, or organs within the body. Do we have strong evidence for internal desynchrony associated with or caused by circadian clock resetting? Here we review the literature, highlighting several key studies from measures of gene expression in laboratory rodents. We conclude that current evidence offers strong support for the premise that some protocols for light-induced resetting are associated with internal desynchrony. It is important to continue research to test whether internal desynchrony is necessary and/or sufficient for negative health impact of circadian disruption.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2631  
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Author Zhao, Z., Zhou, Y., Tan, G., & Li, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Research progress about the effect and prevention of blue light on eyes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue 12 Pages 1999-2003  
  Keywords Vision; Human Health; Review  
  Abstract In recent years, people have become increasingly attentive to light pollution influences on their eyes. In the visible spectrum, short-wave blue light with wavelength between 415 nm and 455 nm is closely related to eye light damage. This high energy blue light passes through the cornea and lens to the retina causing diseases such as dry eye, cataract, age-related macular degeneration, even stimulating the brain, inhibiting melatonin secretion, and enhancing adrenocortical hormone production, which will destroy the hormonal balance and directly affect sleep quality. Therefore, the effect of Blu-rays on ocular is becoming an important concern for the future. We describe blue light's effects on eye tissues, summarize the research on eye injury and its physical prevention and medical treatment.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2313  
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Author Aarts, M.P.J.; Hartmeyer, S.L.; Morsink, K.; Kort, H.S.M.; de Kort, Y.A.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can Special Light Glasses Reduce Sleepiness and Improve Sleep of Nightshift Workers? A Placebo-Controlled Explorative Field Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 225-245  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Nightshift workers go against the natural sleep–wake rhythm. Light can shift the circadian clock but can also induce acute alertness. This placebo-controlled exploratory field study examined the effectiveness of light glasses to improve alertness while reducing the sleep complaints of hospital nurses working nightshifts. In a crossover within-subjects design, 23 nurses participated, using treatment glasses and placebo glasses. Sleepiness and sleep parameters were measured. A linear mixed model analysis on sleepiness revealed no significant main effect of the light intervention. An interaction effect was found indicating that under the placebo condition, sleepiness was significantly higher on the first nightshift than on the last night, while under the treatment condition, sleepiness remained stable across nightshift sessions. Sleepiness during the commute home also showed a significant interaction effect, demonstrating that after the first nightshift, driver sleepiness was higher for placebo than for treatment. Subjective sleep quality showed a negative main effect of treatment vs. placebo, particularly after the first nightshift. In retrospect, both types of light glasses were self-rated as effective. The use of light glasses during the nightshift may help to reduce driver sleepiness during the commute home, which is relevant, as all participants drove home by car or (motor) bike.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2977  
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