toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Melendez-Fernandez, O.H.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prior exposure to dim light at night impairs dermal wound healing in female C57BL/6 mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Archives of Dermatological Research Abbreviated Journal Arch Dermatol Res  
  Volume (down) 311 Issue 7 Pages 573-576  
  Keywords Animals; mouse models; Skin; Human Health  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (LAN) is a pervasive phenomenon in today's society, and the detrimental consequences of LAN exposure are becoming apparent. LAN is associated with the increased incidence of metabolic disorders, cancers, mood alterations, and immune dysfunction in mammals. Consequently, we examined the effects of dim LAN (DLAN) on wound healing. Female C57BL/6 mice were housed for 3 weeks in DLAN or LD conditions prior to wounding. Following wounding, mice were maintained in either their previous light conditions or switched to the opposite lighting conditions for 3 weeks. DLAN prior to wounding impaired healing; specifically, mice in DLAN/DLAN had significantly larger wounds on day 8. Additionally, mice in DLAN/LD had significantly larger wounds on days 5, 7, 8, and 9, and increased average time to closure. These data demonstrate a potential harmful effect of DLAN on wound healing that should be considered and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention.  
  Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-3696 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31144020 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2515  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Burne, B.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pollution By Light Type Journal Article
  Year 1972 Publication The Lancet Abbreviated Journal The Lancet  
  Volume (down) 299 Issue 7751 Pages 642  
  Keywords Commentary, Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0140-6736 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1191  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jafarey, N.A.; Khan, M.Y.; Jafarey, S.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Role Of Artificial Lighting In Decreasing The Age Of Menarche Type Journal Article
  Year 1970 Publication The Lancet Abbreviated Journal The Lancet  
  Volume (down) 296 Issue 7670 Pages 471  
  Keywords commentary; human health  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0140-6736 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1192  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Berson, D.M.; Dunn, F.A.; Takao, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Phototransduction by retinal ganglion cells that set the circadian clock Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume (down) 295 Issue 5557 Pages 1070-1073  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Axons/ultrastructure; *Biological Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; Dendrites/ultrastructure; Isoquinolines; Kinetics; Light; *Light Signal Transduction; Patch-Clamp Techniques; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Retinal Ganglion Cells/chemistry/cytology/*physiology; Rod Opsins/analysis/physiology; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/cytology/*physiology  
  Abstract Light synchronizes mammalian circadian rhythms with environmental time by modulating retinal input to the circadian pacemaker-the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Such photic entrainment requires neither rods nor cones, the only known retinal photoreceptors. Here, we show that retinal ganglion cells innervating the SCN are intrinsically photosensitive. Unlike other ganglion cells, they depolarized in response to light even when all synaptic input from rods and cones was blocked. The sensitivity, spectral tuning, and slow kinetics of this light response matched those of the photic entrainment mechanism, suggesting that these ganglion cells may be the primary photoreceptors for this system.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, RI, 02912 USA. David_Berson@brown.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:11834835 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 720  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ruger, M.; Gordijn, M.C.M.; Beersma, D.G.M.; de Vries, B.; Daan, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Time-of-day-dependent effects of bright light exposure on human psychophysiology: comparison of daytime and nighttime exposure Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol  
  Volume (down) 290 Issue 5 Pages R1413-20  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Body Temperature/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Fatigue/*physiopathology; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Hydrocortisone/*blood; *Light; Sleep Stages/*physiology  
  Abstract Bright light can influence human psychophysiology instantaneously by inducing endocrine (suppression of melatonin, increasing cortisol levels), other physiological changes (enhancement of core body temperature), and psychological changes (reduction of sleepiness, increase of alertness). Its broad range of action is reflected in the wide field of applications, ranging from optimizing a work environment to treating depressed patients. For optimally applying bright light and understanding its mechanism, it is crucial to know whether its effects depend on the time of day. In this paper, we report the effects of bright light given at two different times of day on psychological and physiological parameters. Twenty-four subjects participated in two experiments (n = 12 each). All subjects were nonsmoking, healthy young males (18-30 yr). In both experiments, subjects were exposed to either bright light (5,000 lux) or dim light <10 lux (control condition) either between 12:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. (experiment A) or between midnight and 4:00 A.M. (experiment B). Hourly measurements included salivary cortisol concentrations, electrocardiogram, sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale), fatigue, and energy ratings (Visual Analog Scale). Core body temperature was measured continuously throughout the experiments. Bright light had a time-dependent effect on heart rate and core body temperature; i.e., bright light exposure at night, but not in daytime, increased heart rate and enhanced core body temperature. It had no significant effect at all on cortisol. The effect of bright light on the psychological variables was time independent, since nighttime and daytime bright light reduced sleepiness and fatigue significantly and similarly.  
  Address Department of Chronobiology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. Melanie.Rueger@med.nyu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0363-6119 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16373441 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 801  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: